11 Works

Data from: Initiation of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in the absence of physical contact with infected hosts – a field study in a high altitude lake

Elodie A. Courtois, Adeline Loyau, Mégane Bourgoin & Dirk S. Schmeller
Understanding transmission is a critical prerequisite for predicting disease dynamics and impacts on host populations. It is well established that Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the amphibian fungal pathogen responsible for chytridiomycosis, can be transmitted directly, through physical contact with an infected host. However, indirect pathways of transmission remain poorly investigated. We conducted a five-week long field infection experiment at a high altitude mountain lake in the French Pyrenees to investigate Bd transmission pathways in larval midwife...

Data from: Biotic and abiotic variables influencing plant litter breakdown in streams: a global study

Luz Boyero, Richard Pearson, Cang Hui, Mark Gessner, Javier Perez, Markos Alexandrou, Manuel Graça, Bradley Cardinale, Ricardo Albariño, M. Arunachalam, Leon Barmuta, Andrew Boulton, Andreas Bruder, Marcos Callisto, Eric Chauvet, Russell Death, David Dudgeon, Andrea Encalada, Veronica Ferreira, Ricardo Figueroa, Alex Flecker, , Julie Helson, Tomoya Iwata, Tajang Jinggut … & Catherine Yule
Plant litter breakdown is a key ecological process in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Streams and rivers, in particular, have high rates of carbon dioxide evasion and they contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes. However, there is little information available on the relative roles of different drivers of plant litter breakdown in fresh waters, particularly at large scales. We present a global-scale study of litter breakdown in streams to compare the roles of biotic, climatic and...

Data from: The effects of food web structure on ecosystem function exceeds those of precipitation

M. Kurtis Trzcinski, Diane S. Srivastava, Bruno Corbara, Olivier Dézerald, Céline Leroy, Jean-François Carrias, Alain Dejean & Régis Céréghino
Ecosystems are being stressed by climate change, but few studies have tested food web responses to changes in precipitation patterns and the consequences to ecosystem function. Fewer still have considered whether results from one geographic region can be applied to other regions, given the degree of community change over large biogeographic gradients. We assembled, in one field site, three types of macroinvertebrate communities within water-filled bromeliads. Two represented food webs containing both a fast filter...

Data from: Limited gene dispersal and spatial genetic structure as stabilizing factors in an ant-plant mutualism

Pierre-Jean G. Malé, Céline Leroy, Pierre Humblot, Alain Dejean, Angélique Quilichini & Jérôme Orivel
Comparative studies of the population genetics of closely associated species are necessary to properly understand the evolution of these relationships because gene flow between populations affects the partners' evolutionary potential at the local scale. As a consequence (at least for antagonistic interactions), asymmetries in the strength of the genetic structures of the partner populations can result in one partner having a co-evolutionary advantage. Here, we assess the population genetic structure of partners engaged in a...

Data from: Onset of fights and mutual assessment in ant founding queens

Kevin Berthelot, Felipe Ramon Portugal & Raphael Jeanson
In animals, the progress and outcomes of contests can be influenced by an individual's own condition, its opponent's condition or a combination of both. The use of chemical information to assess the quality of rivals has been underestimated despite its central role in the regulation of social interactions in many taxa. Here, we studied pairwise contests between founding queens of the ant Lasius niger to investigate whether the decision to engage in agonistic interactions relies...

Data from: On the accuracy of genomic selection

Charles-Elie Rabier, Philippe P. Barre, Torben T. Asp, Gilles G. Charmet & Brigitte B. Mangin
Genomic selection is focused on prediction of breeding values of selection candidates by means of high density of markers. It relies on the assumption that all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) tend to be in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with at least one marker. In this context, we present theoretical results regarding the accuracy of genomic selection, i.e., the correlation between predicted and true breeding values. Typically, for individuals (so-called test individuals), breeding values are predicted...

Data from: Adaptation to climate through flowering phenology: a case study in Medicago truncatula

Concetta Burgarella, Nathalie Chantret, Laurène Gay, Jean-Marie Prosperi, Maxime Bonhomme, Peter Tiffin, Nevin D. Young & Joelle Ronfort
Local climatic conditions likely constitute an important selective pressure on genes underlying important fitness-related traits such as flowering time and in many species flowering phenology and climatic gradients strongly covary. To test whether climate shapes genetic variation on flowering time genes and to identify candidate flowering genes involved in the adaptation to environmental heterogeneity, we used a large M. truncatula core collection to examine the association between nucleotide polymorphisms at 224 candidate genes and both...

Data from: Parsing the life-shortening effects of dietary protein: effects of individual amino acids

Sara Arganda, Sofia Bouchebti, Sepideh Bazazi, Sophie Le Hesran, Camille Puga, Gérard Latil, Stephen J. Simpson & Audrey Dussutour
High-protein diets shorten lifespan in many organisms. Is it because protein digestion is energetically costly or because the final products (the amino acids) are harmful? To answer this question while circumventing the life-history trade-off between reproduction and longevity, we fed sterile ant workers on diets based on whole proteins or free amino acids. We found that (i) free amino acids shortened lifespan even more than proteins; (ii) the higher the amino acid-to-carbohydrate ratio, the shorter...

Data from: Arthropod distribution in a tropical rainforest: tackling a four dimensional puzzle

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Jürgen Schmidl, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jonathan R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H.C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan, Andreas Floren, Roger L. Kitching … & Jacques H. C. Delabie
Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14...

Data from: Regression commonality analyses on hierarchical genetic distances.

Jérôme G. Prunier, Marc Colyn, Xavier Legendre & Marie-Christine Flamand
Landscape genetics is emerging as an important way of supporting decision-making in landscape management, in response to the deterioration of matrix permeability due to habitat loss and fragmentation. In line with unremitting methodological developments in landscape genetics, a new analytical procedure was recently proposed as a way of evaluating the effects of landscape gradients on genetic structures. This procedure is based on the computation of inter-individual hierarchical genetic distances (HGD), a metric of genetic differentiation...

Data from: Parallel and non-parallel behavioural evolution in response to parasitism and predation in Trinidadian guppies

Lisa Jacquin, Simon M. Reader, Amandine Boniface, Jaquelynn Mateluna, Iola Patalas, Felipe Pérez-Jvostov & Andrew P. Hendry
Natural enemies such as predators and parasites are known to shape intra-specific variability of behaviour and personality in natural populations, yet several key questions remain: (1) What is the relative importance of predation versus parasitism in shaping intra-specific variation of behaviour across generations? (2) What are the contributions of genetic and plastic effects to this behavioural divergence? And (3) to what extent are responses to predation and parasitism repeatable across independent evolutionary lineages? We addressed...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • University of Toulouse
    11
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    5
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    2
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    2
  • University of Toronto
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • National Museum
    1
  • Universidad De Panama
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1