11 Works

Data from: Climate change and human colonization triggered habitat loss and fragmentation in Madagascar.

Jordi Salmona, Rasmus Heller, Erwan Quéméré & Lounès Chikhi
The relative effect of past climate fluctuations and anthropogenic activities on current biome distribution is subject to increasing attention, notably in biodiversity hot spots. In Madagascar, where humans arrived in the last ~4 to 5,000 years, the exact causes of the demise of large vertebrates that cohabited with humans are yet unclear. The prevailing narrative holds that Madagascar was covered with forest before human arrival and that the expansion of grasslands was the result of...

Data from: Vegetation response to control of invasive Tamarix in southwestern US rivers: a collaborative study including 416 sites

Eduardo González, Anna A. Sher, Robert M. Anderson, Robin F. Bay, Daniel W. Bean, Gabriel J. Bissonnete, Bérenger Bourgeois, David J. Cooper, Kara Dohrenwend, Kim D. Eichhorst, Hisham El Waer, Deborah K. Kennard, Rebecca Harms-Weissinger, Annie L. Henry, Lori J. Makarick, Steven M. Ostoja, Lindsay V. Reynolds, W. Wright Robinson & Patrick B. Shafroth
Most studies assessing vegetation response following control of invasive Tamarix trees along southwestern U.S. rivers have been small in scale (e.g., river reach), or at a regional scale but with poor spatial-temporal replication, and most have not included testing the effects of a now widely-used biological control. We monitored plant composition following Tamarix control along hydrologic, soil and climatic gradients in 244 treated and 172 reference sites across six U.S. States. This represents the largest...

Data from: Division of labor as a bipartite network

Cristian Pasquaretta & Raphael Jeanson
Bipartite ecological networks are increasingly used to described and model relationships between interacting species (e.g. plant-pollinator or host parasite). Here, we apply network methods developed in community ecology to quantify division of labor in insect societies. We consider two quantitative indices (H2' and d') derived from information theory that inform on how much the actual patterns of task performance deviates from the null expectation that workers perform tasks randomly. In addition, we computed network modularity...

Data from: A new genus of horse from Pleistocene North America

Peter D. Heintzman, Grant D. Zazula, Ross D.E. MacPhee, Eric Scott, James A. Cahill, Brianna K. McHorse, Joshua D. Kapp, Mathias Stiller, Matthew J. Wooller, Ludovic Orlando, John R. Southon, Duane G. Froese, Beth Shapiro & John Southon
The extinct “New World stilt-legged”, or NWSL, equids constitute a perplexing group of Pleistocene horses endemic to North America. Their slender distal limb bones resemble those of Asiatic asses, such as the Persian onager. Previous palaeogenetic studies, however, have suggested a closer relationship to caballine horses than to Asiatic asses. Here, we report complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes from NWSL equids from across their geographic range. Although multiple NWSL equid species have been named,...

Data from: Tropical shift in decomposers’ relative contribution to leaf litter breakdown in two Guinean streams

Nathalie Sia Doumbou Tenkiano & Eric Chauvet
The hypothesis that leaf litter breakdown in Guinean streams is governed by microorganisms was confirmed, supporting the reported latitudinal shift in decomposers’ contribution to this process. The large body size of dominant macroinvertebrate decomposers (shrimps) only partially compensated for their very low densities. In contrast with other tropical regions mostly dominated by insect larvae, the functional consequences of global warming on these stream ecosystems may be less severe due to the lower sensitivity of crustaceans...

Data from: The roots of the drought: hydrology and water uptake strategies mediate forest-wide demographic response to precipitation

Rutuja Chitra-Tarak, Laurent Ruiz, H. S. Dattaraja, M. S. Mohan Kumar, Jean Riotte, H. S. Suresh, Sean M. McMahon & Raman Sukumar
Drought-induced tree mortality is expected to increase globally due to climate change, with profound implications for forest composition, function and global climate feedbacks. How drought is experienced by different species is thought to depend fundamentally on where they access water vertically below ground, but this remains untracked so far due to the difficulty of measuring water availability at depths at which plants access water (few to several tens of meters), the broad temporal scales at...

Data from: Higher iridescent-to-pigment optical effect in flowers facilitates learning, memory and generalization in foraging bumblebees

Géraud De Premorel, Martin Giurfa, Christine Andraud & Doris Gomez
Iridescence—change of colour with changes in the angle of viewor of illumination— is widespread in the living world but its functions remain poorly understood. The presence of iridescence has been suggested in flowers where diffraction gratings generate iridescent colours. Such colours have been suggested to serve plant–pollinator communication. Here we tested whether a higher iridescence relative to corolla pigmentation would facilitate discrimination, learning and retention of iridescent visual targets. We conditioned bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to...

Data from: Perception of contextual size illusions by honeybees in restricted and unrestricted viewing conditions

Scarlett R. Howard, Aurore Avargues-Weber, Jair Eduardo Garcia Mendoza, Devi Stuart-Fox, Adrian G. Dyer & Jair E. Garcia
How different visual systems process images and make perceptual errors can inform us about cognitive and visual processes. One of the strongest geometric errors in perception is a misperception of size depending on the size of surrounding objects, known as the Ebbinghaus or Titchener illusion. The ability to perceive the Ebbinghaus illusion appears to vary dramatically among vertebrate species, and even populations, but this may depend on whether the viewing distance is restricted. We tested...

Data from: The functional syndrome: linking individual trait variability to ecosystem functioning

Allan Raffard, Antoine Lecerf, Julien Cote, Mathieu Buoro, Remy Lassus & Julien Cucherousset
Phenotypic variability is increasingly assessed through functional response and effect traits, which provide a mechanistic framework for investigating how an organism responds to varying ecological factors and how these responses affect ecosystem functioning. Covariation between response and effect traits has been poorly examined at the intraspecific level, thus hampering progress in understanding how phenotypic variability alters the role of organisms in ecosystems. Using a multi-trait approach and a nine-month longitudinal monitoring of individual red-swamp crayfish...

Data from: Nucleolar sub-compartments in motion during rRNA synthesis inhibition: contraction of nucleolar condensed chromatin and gathering of fibrillar centers are concomitant

Pavel Tchelidze, Aassif Benassarou, Hervé Kaplan, Marie-Françoise O'Donohue, Laurent Lucas, Christine Terryn, Levan Rusishvili, Giorgi Mosidze, Nathalie Lalun, Dominique Ploton & Marie-Françoise O’Donohue
The nucleolus produces the large polycistronic transcript (47S precursor) containing the 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA sequences and hosts most of the nuclear steps of pre-rRNA processing. Among numerous components it contains condensed chromatin and active rRNA genes which adopt a more accessible conformation. For this reason, it is a paradigm of chromosome territory organization. Active rRNA genes are clustered within several fibrillar centers (FCs), in which they are maintained in an open configuration by...

Data from: Resource composition mediates the effects of intraspecific variability in nutrient recycling on ecosystem processes

Charlotte Evangelista, Antoine Lecerf, J. Robert Britton & Julien Cucherousset
Despite the growing evidence for individual variation in trophic niche within populations, its potential indirect effects on ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. In particular, few studies have investigated how intraspecific trophic variability can modulate the effects of consumers on ecosystems through potential changes in nutrient excretion rates. Here, we first quantified the level of intraspecific trophic variability in 11 wild populations of the omnivorous fish Lepomis gibbosus. Outputs from stomach content and stable isotope analyses...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • University of Toulouse
    11
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Paul Sabatier University
    3
  • University of California System
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    1
  • Smithsonian Institution
    1
  • McGill University
    1
  • Bureau of Land Management
    1