14 Works

Data from: Mixed-source reintroductions lead to outbreeding depression in second-generation descendents of a native North American fish

David D Huff, Loren M Miller, Christopher J Chizinski & Bruce Vondracek
Reintroductions are commonly employed to preserve intraspecific biodiversity in fragmented landscapes. However, reintroduced populations are frequently smaller and more geographically isolated than native populations. Mixing genetically divergent sources is often proposed to attenuate potentially low genetic diversity in reintroduced populations that may result from small effective population sizes. However, a possible negative tradeoff for mixing sources is outbreeding depression in hybrid offspring. We examined the consequences of mixed-source reintroductions on several fitness surrogates at nine...

Data from: Analysis of inbreeding depression in mixed-mating plants provides evidence for selective interference and stable mixed mating

Alice A Winn, Elizabeth Elle, Susan Kalisz, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G Eckert, Carol Goodwillie, Mark O. Johnston, David A Moeller, Richard H Ree, Risa D Sargent & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Hermaphroditic individuals can produce both selfed and outcrossed progeny, termed mixed mating. General theory predicts that mixed-mating populations should evolve quickly toward high rates of selfing, driven by rapid purging of genetic load and loss of inbreeding depression (ID), but the substantial number of mixed-mating species observed in nature calls this prediction into question. Greater average ID reported for selfing than for outcrossing populations is consistent with purging and suggests that mixed-mating taxa in evolutionary...

Data from: Parent-of-origin effects on gene expression and DNA methylation in the maize endosperm

Amanda J Waters, Irina Makarevitch, Steve R Eichten, Ruth A Swanson-Wagner, Cheng-Ting Yeh, Wayne Xu, Patrick S Schnable, Matthew W Vaughn, Mary Gehring & Nathan M Springer
Imprinting describes the differential expression of alleles based upon their parent of origin. Deep sequencing of RNAs from maize endosperm and embryo tissue 14 days after pollination was used to identify imprinted genes among a set of ~12,000 genes that were expressed and contained sequence polymorphisms between the B73 and Mo17 genotypes. The analysis of parent-of-origin patterns of expression resulted in the identification of 100 putative imprinted genes in maize endosperm including 54 maternally expressed...

Data from: Insects on plants: explaining the paradox of low diversity within specialist herbivore guilds

Vojtech Novotny, Scott E. Miller, Jan Hrcek, Leontine Baje, Yves Basset, Owen T. Lewis, Alan J. A. Stewart & George D. Weiblen
Classical niche theory explains the coexistence of species through their exploitation of different resources. Assemblages of herbivores coexisting on a particular plant species are thus expected to be dominated by species from host-specific guilds with narrow, coexistence-facilitating niches, rather than by species from generalist guilds. Exactly the opposite pattern is observed for folivores feeding on trees in New Guinea. The least specialized mobile chewers were most species-rich, followed by the moderately specialized semi-concealed and exposed...

Data from: Does a facultative mutualism limit species range expansion?

John Stanton-Geddes & Carolyn G. Anderson
The availability and quality of mutualists beyond a species’ range edge may limit range expansion. With the legume Chamaecrista fasciculata, we asked to what extent the availability and quality of rhizobia beyond the range edge limits host range expansion. We tested the effect of rhizobia availability on plant growth by transplanting seed from three locations into five sites spanning C. fasciculata’s range (interior, at the northern and western range edges, and beyond the range edges),...

Data from: Modeling effects of environmental change on wolf population dynamics, trait evolution, and life history

Tim Coulson, Daniel R. MacNulty, Daniel R. Stahler, Bridgett VonHoldt, Robert K. Wayne & Douglas W. Smith
Environmental change has been observed to generate simultaneous responses in population dynamics, life history, gene frequencies, and morphology in a number of species. But how common are such eco-evolutionary responses to environmental change likely to be? Are they inevitable, or do they require a specific type of change? Can we accurately predict eco-evolutionary responses? We address these questions using theory and data from the study of Yellowstone wolves. We show that environmental change is expected...

Data from: Pleistocene speciation in the genus Populus (Salicaceae)

Nicholas D. Levsen, Peter Tiffin & Matthew S. Olson
The macro-evolutionary consequences of recent climate change remain controversial and there is little paleobotanical or morphological evidence that Pleistocene (1.8-0.12 Ma) glacial cycles acted as drivers of speciation, especially among lineages with long generation times, such as trees. We combined genetic and ecogeographic data from two closely related North American tree species, Populus balsamifera and P. trichocarpa (Salicacaeae) to determine if their divergence coincided with and was possibly caused by Pleistocene climatic events. We analyzed...

Data from: Mixed-source reintroductions lead to outbreeding depression in second-generation descendents of a native North American fish

David D Huff, Loren M Miller, Christopher J Chizinski & Bruce Vondracek
Reintroductions are commonly employed to preserve intraspecific biodiversity in fragmented landscapes. However, reintroduced populations are frequently smaller and more geographically isolated than native populations. Mixing genetically divergent sources is often proposed to attenuate potentially low genetic diversity in reintroduced populations that may result from small effective population sizes. However, a possible negative tradeoff for mixing sources is outbreeding depression in hybrid offspring. We examined the consequences of mixed-source reintroductions on several fitness surrogates at nine...

Data from: Pleistocene speciation in the genus Populus (Salicaceae)

Nicholas D. Levsen, Peter Tiffin & Matthew S. Olson
The macro-evolutionary consequences of recent climate change remain controversial and there is little paleobotanical or morphological evidence that Pleistocene (1.8-0.12 Ma) glacial cycles acted as drivers of speciation, especially among lineages with long generation times, such as trees. We combined genetic and ecogeographic data from two closely related North American tree species, Populus balsamifera and P. trichocarpa (Salicacaeae) to determine if their divergence coincided with and was possibly caused by Pleistocene climatic events. We analyzed...

Data from: Parent-of-origin effects on gene expression and DNA methylation in the maize endosperm

Amanda J Waters, Irina Makarevitch, Steve R Eichten, Ruth A Swanson-Wagner, Cheng-Ting Yeh, Wayne Xu, Patrick S Schnable, Matthew W Vaughn, Mary Gehring & Nathan M Springer
Imprinting describes the differential expression of alleles based upon their parent of origin. Deep sequencing of RNAs from maize endosperm and embryo tissue 14 days after pollination was used to identify imprinted genes among a set of ~12,000 genes that were expressed and contained sequence polymorphisms between the B73 and Mo17 genotypes. The analysis of parent-of-origin patterns of expression resulted in the identification of 100 putative imprinted genes in maize endosperm including 54 maternally expressed...

Data from: Analysis of inbreeding depression in mixed-mating plants provides evidence for selective interference and stable mixed mating

Alice A Winn, Elizabeth Elle, Susan Kalisz, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G Eckert, Carol Goodwillie, Mark O. Johnston, David A Moeller, Richard H Ree, Risa D Sargent & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Hermaphroditic individuals can produce both selfed and outcrossed progeny, termed mixed mating. General theory predicts that mixed-mating populations should evolve quickly toward high rates of selfing, driven by rapid purging of genetic load and loss of inbreeding depression (ID), but the substantial number of mixed-mating species observed in nature calls this prediction into question. Greater average ID reported for selfing than for outcrossing populations is consistent with purging and suggests that mixed-mating taxa in evolutionary...

Data from: Does a facultative mutualism limit species range expansion?

John Stanton-Geddes & Carolyn G. Anderson
The availability and quality of mutualists beyond a species’ range edge may limit range expansion. With the legume Chamaecrista fasciculata, we asked to what extent the availability and quality of rhizobia beyond the range edge limits host range expansion. We tested the effect of rhizobia availability on plant growth by transplanting seed from three locations into five sites spanning C. fasciculata’s range (interior, at the northern and western range edges, and beyond the range edges),...

Data from: Modeling effects of environmental change on wolf population dynamics, trait evolution, and life history

Tim Coulson, Daniel R. MacNulty, Daniel R. Stahler, Bridgett VonHoldt, Robert K. Wayne & Douglas W. Smith
Environmental change has been observed to generate simultaneous responses in population dynamics, life history, gene frequencies, and morphology in a number of species. But how common are such eco-evolutionary responses to environmental change likely to be? Are they inevitable, or do they require a specific type of change? Can we accurately predict eco-evolutionary responses? We address these questions using theory and data from the study of Yellowstone wolves. We show that environmental change is expected...

Data from: Insects on plants: explaining the paradox of low diversity within specialist herbivore guilds

Vojtech Novotny, Scott E. Miller, Jan Hrcek, Leontine Baje, Yves Basset, Owen T. Lewis, Alan J. A. Stewart & George D. Weiblen
Classical niche theory explains the coexistence of species through their exploitation of different resources. Assemblages of herbivores coexisting on a particular plant species are thus expected to be dominated by species from host-specific guilds with narrow, coexistence-facilitating niches, rather than by species from generalist guilds. Exactly the opposite pattern is observed for folivores feeding on trees in New Guinea. The least specialized mobile chewers were most species-rich, followed by the moderately specialized semi-concealed and exposed...

Registration Year

  • 2011
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Minnesota
    14
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • University of Sussex
    2
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of Pittsburgh
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    2
  • Smithsonian Institution
    2
  • East Carolina University
    2