6 Works

Data from: Extremely fast feeding strikes are powered by elastic recoil in a seahorse relative, the snipefish, Macroramphosus scolopax

Sarah J. Longo, Tyler Goodearly & Peter C. Wainwright
Among over 30,000 species of ray-finned fishes, seahorses and pipefishes have a unique feeding mechanism whereby the elastic recoil of tendons allows them to rotate their long snouts extremely rapidly in order to capture small elusive prey. To understand the evolutionary origins of this feeding mechanism, its phylogenetic distribution among closely related lineages must be assessed. We present evidence for elastic recoil powered feeding in the snipefish (Macroramphosus scolopax) from kinematics, dynamics, and morphology. High-speed...

Data from: Selective logging intensity in an East African rain forest predicts reductions in ant diversity

Samuel R. P-J. Ross, Francisco Hita Garcia, Georg Fischer, Marcell K. Peters & Samuel R. P.-J. Ross
As natural forest ecosystems increasingly face pressure from deforestation, it is ever more important to understand the impacts of habitat fragmentation and degradation on biodiversity. Most studies of anthropogenic change in the tropics come from Southeast Asia and South America, and impacts of habitat modification are often taxon-specific. Here we empirically assessed the impact of habitat fragmentation and recent (within 25 years) and historic (>25 years ago) selective logging on the diversity of ants in...

Data from: Estimation of inhalation flow profile using audio-based methods to assess inhaler medication adherence

Terence E. Taylor, Helena Lacalle Muls, Richard W. Costello & Richard B. Reilly
Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are required to inhale forcefully and deeply to receive medication when using a dry powder inhaler (DPI). There is a clinical need to objectively monitor the inhalation flow profile of DPIs in order to remotely monitor patient inhalation technique. Audio-based methods have been previously employed to accurately estimate flow parameters such as the peak inspiratory flow rate of inhalations, however, these methods required multiple calibration inhalation audio...

Data from: The effect of agriculture on the seasonal dynamics and functional diversity of benthic biofilm in tropical headwater streams

Ricardo H. Taniwaki, Christoph D. Matthaei, Tatima K. M. Cardoso, Silvio F. B. Ferraz, Luiz A. Martinelli & Jeremy J. Piggott
Tropical streams are one of the most endangered ecosystems in the world due to the constant pressures from human activities. Among these activities, agriculture represents a land use that is crucial for human development but also a key driver of stream degradation and biodiversity decline in the tropics. Against this background, we investigated indirect effects of agriculture (alterations in stream flow and nutrient availability) and climate characteristics (water temperature) on benthic biofilm communities in tropical...

Data from: Competition between co-occurring invasive and native consumers switches between habitats

Nadescha Zwerschke, Henk Van Rein, Chris Harrod, Carl Reddin, Mark C. Emmerson, Dai Roberts, Nessa E. O'Connor & Henk Rein
1. The introduction of a non-native species frequently has adverse direct effects on native species. The underlying mechanisms, however, often remain unclear, in particular where native and invasive species are taxonomically similar. 2. We found evidence of direct competitive interactions between a globally distributed invasive species (the Pacific oyster, Magallana gigas) and its native counterpart (the European oyster, Ostrea edulis). We also discovered that the competitive outcome differed between different habitat types and structures by...

Data from: Electrophysiological correlates of semantic dissimilarity reflect the comprehension of natural, narrative speech

Michael P. Broderick, Andrew J. Anderson, Giovanni M. Di Liberto, Michael J. Crosse & Edmund C. Lalor
People routinely hear and understand speech at rates of 120–200 words per minute [1, 2]. Thus, speech comprehension must involve rapid, online neural mechanisms that process words’ meanings in an approximately time-locked fashion. However, in the context of continuous speech, electrophysiological evidence for such time-locked processing has been lacking. Whilst valuable insights into the semantic processing of speech have been provided by the “N400 component” of the event-related potential [3-6], this literature has been dominated...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Trinity College
    6
  • University of Würzburg
    1
  • Queen's University Belfast
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    1
  • PSL Research University
    1
  • Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
    1
  • University of Otago
    1
  • British Antarctic Survey
    1
  • University of Barcelona
    1