12 Works

Data from: Development of common leaf-footed bug pests depends on the presence and identity of their environmentally-acquired symbionts

Martha Hunter, Edwin Umanzor, Suzanne Kelly, Shaira Whittaker & Alison Ravenscraft
Many beneficial symbioses between bacteria and their terrestrial arthropod hosts are vertically transmitted from mother to offspring, ensuring the progeny acquire necessary partners. Unusually, in several families of coreoid and lygeoid bugs (Hemiptera), nymphs must instead ingest the beneficial symbiont, Burkholderia (sensu lato), from the environment early in development. We studied the effects of Burkholderia on development of two species of leaf-footed bug (Coreidae) in the genus Leptoglossus, L. zonatus and L. phyllopus. We found...

Data for: Transgenerational plasticity in the eye size of Daphnia

Matthew Walsh & Michael Gillis
It is well established that environmental signals can induce phenotypic responses that persist for multiple generations. The induction of such 'transgenerational plasticity' (TGP) depends upon the ability of organisms to accurately receive and process information from environmental signals. Thus, sensory systems are likely intertwined with TGP. Here we tested the link between an environmental stressor and transgenerational responses in a component of the sensory system (eye size) that is linked to enhanced vision and ecologically-relevant...

Phylogenomics, introgression, and demographic history of South American true toads (Rhinella)

Danielle Rivera, Ivan Prates, Thomas Firneno, Miguel Rodrigues, Janalee Caldwell & Matthew Fujita
The effects of genetic introgression on species boundaries and how they affect species’ integrity and persistence over evolutionary time have received increased attention. The increasing availability of genomic data has revealed contrasting patterns of gene flow across genomic regions, which impose challenges to inferences of evolutionary relationships and of patterns of genetic admixture across lineages. By characterizing patterns of variation across thousands of genomic loci in a widespread complex of true toads (Rhinella), we assess...

The impacts of nutrient supply and imbalance on subcontinental co-occurrence networks and metacommunity composition of stream algae

William Budnick, Joseph Mruzek, Chad Larson & Sophia I. Passy
The amounts and ratios of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) are important determinants of producer community biodiversity and composition and their responses to climate and dispersal. However, the nutrient effects on co-occurrence network topology, particularly in freshwaters, are understudied. Here, we investigate 1) whether nutrient supply and ratio constrain topological properties of algal co-occurrence networks in streams and 2) to what extent climate and space (a surrogate for dispersal) affect co-occurrence network topology vs. metacommunity composition...

Data: Avian cultural services peak in tropical wet forests

Alejandra Echeverri, Daniel Karp, Luke Frishkoff, Jaya Krishnan, Robin Naidoo, Jiaying Zhao, Jim Zook & Kai Chan
The current biodiversity crisis involves major shifts in biological communities at local and regional scales. The consequences for Earth’s life-support systems are increasingly well-studied, but knowledge of how community shifts affect cultural services associated with wildlife lags behind. We integrated bird census data (three years across 150 point-count locations) with questionnaire surveys (>400 people) to evaluate changes in culturally important species across climate and land-use gradients in Costa Rica. For farmers, urbanites, and birdwatchers alike,...

A trait-based framework for predicting foodborne pathogen risk from wild birds

Olivia Smith, Elissa Olimpi, Nora Navarro-González, Kevin Cornell, Luke Frishkoff, Tobin Northfield, Timothy Bowles, Max Edworthy, Johnna Eilers, Zhen Fu, Karina Garcia, David Gonthier, Matthew Jones, Christina Kennedy, Christopher Latimer, Jeb Owen, Chika Sato, Joseph Taylor, Erin Wilson Rankin, William Snyder & Daniel Karp
Recent foodborne illness outbreaks have heightened pressures on growers to deter wildlife from farms, jeopardizing conservation efforts. However, it remains unclear which species, particularly birds, pose the greatest risk to food safety. Using >11,000 pathogen tests and 1,565 bird surveys covering 139 bird species from across the western U.S.A., we examined the importance of 11 traits in mediating wild bird risk to food safety. We tested whether traits associated with pathogen exposure (e.g., habitat associations,...

Economic evaluation of sea-level rise adaptation strongly influenced by hydrodynamic feedbacks: Dataset 1

Robert Griffin, Michelle Hummel, Katie Arkema & Anne Guerry
Coastal communities rely on levees and seawalls as critical protection against sea-level rise; in the U.S. alone, $300 billion in shoreline armoring costs are forecast by 2100. But despite the local flood risk reduction benefits, these structures can exacerbate flooding and associated damages along other parts of the shoreline—particularly in coastal bays and estuaries, where nearly 500 million people globally are at risk from sea-level rise. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the economic impact...

Phylogenomic assessment of biodiversity using a reference-based taxonomy: An example with Horned Lizards (Phrynosoma)

Adam Leache, Hayden Davis, Sonal Singhal, Matt Fujita & Megan Lahti
Phylogenomic investigations of biodiversity facilitate the detection of fine-scale population genetic structure and the demographic histories of species and populations. However, determining whether or not the genetic divergence measured among populations reflects species-level differentiation remains a central challenge in species delimitation. One potential solution is to compare genetic divergence between putative new species with other closely related species, sometimes referred to as a reference-based taxonomy. To be described as a new species, a population should...

The effects of climate and demographic history in shaping genomic variation across populations of the Desert Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma platyrhinos)

Keaka Farleigh, Sarah A. Vladimirova, Christopher Blair, Jason T. Bracken, Nazila Koochekian, Drew R. Schield, Daren C. Card, Nicholas Finger, Jonathan Henault, Adam D. Leaché, Todd A. Castoe & Tereza Jezkova
Species often experience spatial environmental heterogeneity across their range, and populations may exhibit signatures of adaptation to local environmental characteristics. Other population genetic processes, such as migration and genetic drift, can impede the effects of local adaptation. Genetic drift in particular can have a pronounced effect on population genetic structure during large-scale geographic expansions, where a series of founder effects leads to decreases in genetic variation in the direction of the expansion. Here we explore...

Economic evaluation of sea-level rise adaptation strongly influenced by hydrodynamic feedbacks: Dataset 2

Robert Griffin, Michelle Hummell, Katie Arkema & Anne Guerry
Coastal communities rely on levees and seawalls as critical protection against sea-level rise; in the U.S. alone, $300 billion in shoreline armoring costs are forecast by 2100. But despite the local flood risk reduction benefits, these structures can exacerbate flooding and associated damages along other parts of the shoreline—particularly in coastal bays and estuaries, where nearly 500 million people globally are at risk from sea-level rise. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the economic impact...

Data from: Identity signaling, identity reception and the evolution of social recognition in a Neotropical frog

James Tumulty, Zachary Lange & Mark Bee
Animals recognize familiar individuals to perform a variety of important social behaviors. Social recognition is often mediated by communication between signalers who produce signals that contain identity information and receivers who categorize these signals based on previous experience. We tested two hypotheses about adaptations in signalers and receivers that enable the evolution of social recognition using two species of closely related territorial poison frogs. Male golden rocket frogs (Anomaloglossus beebei) recognize the advertisement calls of...

Divergence time estimation of genus Tribolium by extensive sampling of highly conserved orthologs

Balan Ramesh, Thomas Firneno & Jeffrey Demuth
Tribolium castaneum, the red flour beetle, is among the most well-studied eukaryotic genetic model organisms. Tribolium often serves as a comparative bridge from highly derived Drosophila traits to other organisms. Simultaneously, as a member of the most diverse order of metazoans, Coleoptera, Tribolium informs us about innovations that accompany hyper diversity. However, understanding the tempo and mode of evolutionary innovation requires well-resolved, time-calibrated phylogenies, which are not available for Tribolium. The most recent effort to...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • The University of Texas at Arlington
    12
  • Stanford University
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    1
  • City University of New York
    1
  • The Nature Conservancy
    1
  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Van Andel Institute
    1