38 Works

Data from: Soil fungal communities of grasslands are environmentally structured at a regional scale in the Alps

Loic Pellissier, Hélène Niculita-Hirzel, Anne Dubuis, Marco Pagni, Nicolas Guex, Charlotte Ndiribe, Nicolas Salamin, Ioannis Xennarios, Jerome Goudet, Ian R. Sanders, Antoine Guisan & I. Xenarios
Studying patterns of species distributions along elevation gradients is frequently used to identify the primary factors that determine the distribution, diversity and assembly of species. However, despite their crucial role in ecosystem functioning, our understanding of the distribution of below-ground fungi is still limited, calling for more comprehensive studies of fungal biogeography along environmental gradients at various scales (from regional to global). Here, we investigated the richness of taxa of soil fungi and their phylogenetic...

Data from: Decoupled post-glacial history in mutualistic plant-insect interactions: insights from the yellow loosestrife (Lysimachia vulgaris) and its associated oil-collecting bees (Macropis europaea and M. fulvipes)

Yann Triponez, Anahí Espíndola, Nils Arrigo & Nadir Alvarez
Aim: We take a comparative phylogeographical approach to assess whether three species involved in a specialized oil-rewarding pollination system (i.e. Lysimachia vulgaris and two oil-collecting bees within the genus Macropis) show congruent phylogeographical trajectories during post-glacial colonization processes. Our working hypothesis is that within specialized mutualistic interactions, where each species relies on the co-occurrence of the other for survival and/or reproduction, partners are expected to show congruent evolutionary trajectories, because they are likely to have...

Data from: Seasonality in communication and collective decision-making in ants

Nathalie Stroeymeyt, Caroline Jordan, Gregory Mayer, Sarah Hovsepian, Martin Giurfa & Nigel R. Franks
The ability of animals to adjust their behaviour according to seasonal changes in their ecology is crucial for their fitness. Eusocial insects display strong collective behavioural seasonality, yet the mechanisms underlying such changes are poorly understood. We show that nest preference by emigrating Temnothorax albipennis ant colonies is influenced by a season-specific modulatory pheromone that may help tune decision-making according to seasonal constraints. The modulatory pheromone triggers aversion towards low-quality nests and enhances colony cohesion...

Data from: Performance of individual vs group sampling for inferring dispersal under isolation by distance

Natacha Luximon, Eric J. Petit & Thomas Broquet
Models of isolation-by-distance formalize the effects of genetic drift and gene flow in a spatial context where gene dispersal is spatially limited. These models have been used to show that, at an appropriate spatial scale, dispersal parameters can be inferred from the regression of genetic differentiation against geographic distance between sampling locations. This approach is compelling because it is relatively simple and robust, and has rather low sampling requirements. In continuous populations, dispersal can be...

Data from: Male cognitive performance declines in the absence of sexual selection

Brian Hollis & Tadeusz J. Kawecki
Sexual selection is responsible for the evolution of male ornaments and armaments, but its role in the evolution of cognition—the ability to process, retain and use information—is largely unexplored. Because successful courtship is likely to involve processing information in complex, competitive sexual environments, we hypothesized that sexual selection contributes to the evolution and maintenance of cognitive abilities in males. To test this, we removed mate choice and mate competition from experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster...

Data from: Automated quantitative histology reveals vascular morphodynamics during Arabidopsis hypocotyl secondary growth

Martial Sankar, Kaisa Nieminen, Laura Ragni, Ioannis Xenarios & Christian S. Hardtke
Among various advantages, their small size makes model organisms preferred subjects of investigation. Yet, even in model systems detailed analysis of numerous developmental processes at cellular level is severely hampered by their scale. For instance, secondary growth of Arabidopsis hypocotyls creates a radial pattern of highly specialized tissues that comprises several thousand cells starting from a few dozen. This dynamic process is difficult to follow because of its scale and because it can only be...

Data from: Geographic variation in sex-chromosome differentiation in the common frog (Rana temporaria)

Nicolas Rodrigues, Juha Merilä, Cécile Patrelle & Nicolas Perrin
In sharp contrast with birds and mammals, sex-determination systems in ectothermic vertebrates are often highly dynamic and sometimes multifactorial. Both environmental and genetic effects have been documented in common frogs (Rana temporaria). One genetic linkage group, mapping to the largest pair of chromosomes and harboring the candidate sex-determining gene Dmrt1, associates with sex in several populations throughout Europe, but association varies both within and among populations. Here we show that sex association at this linkage...

Data from: Origin and genome evolution of polyploid green toads in Central Asia: evidence from microsatellite markers

Caroline Betto-Colliard, Roberto Sermier, Spartak Litvinchuk, Nicolas Perrin & Matthias Stöck
Polyploidization, which is expected to trigger major genomic reorganizations, occurs much less commonly in animals than in plants, possibly because of constraints imposed by sex-determination systems. We investigated the origins and consequences of allopolyploidization in Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) from Central Asia, with three ploidy levels and different modes of genome transmission (sexual versus clonal), to (i) establish a topology for the reticulate phylogeny in a species-rich radiation involving several closely related lineages...

Data from: Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae)

Gregory Brazzola, Nathalie Chèvre & Claus Wedekind
The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within...

Data from: Isotopic variation ccross the Audubon’s-myrtle warbler hybrid zone

David P. L. Toews, Alan Brelsford & Darren E. Irwin
Differences in seasonal migratory behaviours are thought to be an important component of reproductive isolation in many organisms. Stable isotopes have been used with success in estimating the location and qualities of disjunct breeding and wintering areas. However, few studies have used isotopic data to estimate the movements of hybrid offspring in species that form hybrid zones. Here, we use stable hydrogen to estimate the wintering locations and migratory patterns of two common and widespread...

Data from: Inferring the degree of incipient speciation in secondary contact zones of closely related lineages of Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup)

Christophe Dufresnes, Lucio Bonato, Nicola Novarini, Caroline Betto-Colliard, Nicolas Perrin & Matthias Stöck
Reproductive isolation between lineages is expected to accumulate with divergence time, but the time taken to speciate may strongly vary between different groups of organisms. In anuran amphibians, laboratory crosses can still produce viable hybrid offspring >20 My after separation, but the speed of speciation in closely related anuran lineages under natural conditions is poorly studied. Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) offer an excellent system to address this question, comprising several lineages that arose...

Data from: Evolutionary dynamics of interlinked public goods traits: an experimental study of siderophore production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Adin Ross-Gillespie, Zoé Dumas & Rolf Kümmerli
Public goods cooperation is common in microbes, and there is much interest in understanding how such traits evolve. Research in recent years has identified several important factors that shape the evolutionary dynamics of such systems, yet few studies have investigated scenarios involving interactions between multiple public goods. Here we offer general predictions about the evolutionary trajectories of two public goods traits having positive, negative or neutral regulatory influence on one another's expression, and we report...

Data from: Social structure varies with elevation in an alpine ant

Jessica Purcell, Loïc Pellissier & Michel Chapuisat
Insect societies vary greatly in social organization, yet the relative roles of ecological and genetic factors in driving this variation remain poorly understood. Identifying how social structure varies along environmental gradients can provide insights into the ecological conditions favouring alternative social organizations. Here, we investigate how queen number variation is distributed along elevation gradients within a socially polymorphic ant, the Alpine silver ant Formica selysi. We sampled low and high elevation populations in multiple Alpine...

Data from: Molecular proxies for climate maladaptation in a long-lived tree (Pinus pinaster Aiton, Pinaceae)

Juan Pablo Jaramilo-Correa, Isabel Rodríguez-Quilón, Delphine Grivet, Camille Lepoittevin, Federico Sebastiani, Myriam Heuertz, Pauline H. Garnier-Géré, Ricardo Alía, Christophe Plomion, Giovanni G. Vendramin, Santiago C. González-Martínez, J.-P. Jaramillo-Correa, S. C. Gonzalez-Martinez & P. H. Garnier-Gere
Understanding adaptive genetic responses to climate change is a main challenge for preserving biological diversity. Successful predictive models for climate-driven range shifts of species depend on the integration of information on adaptation, including that derived from genomic studies. Long-lived forest trees can experience substantial environmental change across generations, which results in a much more prominent adaptation lag than in annual species. Here, we show that candidate-gene SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) can be used as predictors...

Data from: Wheat alleles introgress into selfing wild relatives: empirical estimates from Approximate Bayesian Computation in Aegilops triuncialis.

Mila Pajkovic, Sylvain Lappe, Rachel Barman, Christian Parisod, Samuel Neuenschwander, Jerome Goudet, Nadir Alvarez, Robero Guadagnuolo, Francois Felber, Nils Arrigo & Roberto Guadagnuolo
Extensive gene flow between wheat (Triticum sp.) and several wild relatives of the genus Aegilops has recently been detected despite notoriously high levels of selfing in these species. Here, we assess and model the spread of wheat alleles into natural populations of the barbed goatgrass (Aegilops triuncialis), a wild wheat relative prevailing in the Mediterranean flora. Our sampling, based on an extensive survey of 31 Ae. triuncialis populations collected along a 60 km x 20...

Data from: Natural selection in a post-glacial range expansion: the case of the colour cline in the European barn owl

Sylvain Antoniazza, Ricardo Kanitz, Samuel Neuenschwander, Reto Burri, Arnaud Gaigher, Alexandre Roulin & Jérôme Goudet
Gradients of variation – or clines – have always intrigued biologists. Classically, they have been interpreted as the outcomes of antagonistic interactions between selection and gene flow. Alternatively, clines may also establish neutrally with isolation-by-distance or secondary contact between previously isolated populations. The relative importance of natural selection and these two neutral processes in the establishment of clinal variation can be tested by comparing genetic differentiation at neutral genetic markers and at the studied trait....

Data from: First-generation linkage map for the European tree frog (Hyla arborea) with utility in congeneric species

Christophe Dufresnes, Alan Brelsford & Nicolas Perrin
Background: Western Palearctic tree frogs (Hyla arborea group) represent a strong potential for evolutionary and conservation genetic research, so far underexploited due to limited molecular resources. New microsatellite markers have recently been developed for Hyla arborea, with high cross-species utility across the entire circum-Mediterranean radiation. Here we conduct sibship analyses to map available markers for use in future population genetic applications. Findings: We characterized eight linkage groups, including one sex-linked, all showing drastically reduced recombination...

Data from: Sex-chromosome differentiation parallels post-glacial range expansion in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea).

Christophe Dufresnes, Youna Bertholet, Jérôme Wassef, Karim Ghali, Romain Savary, Baptiste Pasteur, Alan Brelsford, Beata Rozenblut-Kościsty, Maria Ogielska, Matthias Stöck & Nicolas Perrin
Occasional XY recombination is a proposed explanation for the sex-chromosome homomorphy in European tree frogs. Numerous laboratory crosses, however, failed to detect any event of male recombination, and a detailed survey of NW-European Hyla arborea populations identified male-specific alleles at sex-linked loci, pointing to the absence of XY recombination in their recent history. Here we address this paradox in a phylogeographic framework, by genotyping sex-linked microsatellite markers in populations and sibships from the entire species...

Data from: Predicting spatial patterns of plant species richness: a comparison of direct macroecological and species stacking modelling approaches

Antoine Guisan, Anne Dubuis & Pascal Vittoz
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN TWO OTHER PUBLICATIONS. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2008.01766.x AND http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.12222 FOR MORE INFORMATION. Aim: This study compares the direct, macroecological approach (MEM) for modelling species richness (SR) with the more recent approach of stacking predictions from individual species distributions (S-SDM). We implemented both approaches on the same dataset and discuss their respective theoretical assumptions, strengths and drawbacks. We also tested how both approaches performed in reproducing observed patterns...

Data from: Cumulative frequency-dependent selective episodes allow for rapid morph cycles and rock-paper-scissors dynamics in species with overlapping generations

Luis M. San-Jose, Miguel Peñalver-Alcázar, Borja Milá, Virginia Gonzalez-Jimena, Patrick S. Fitze, B. Mila & M. Penalver-Alcazar
Rock-paper-scissors (RPS) dynamics, which maintain genetic polymorphisms over time through negative frequency-dependent (FD) selection, can evolve in short-lived species with no generational overlap, where they produce rapid morph frequency cycles. However, most species have overlapping generations and thus, rapid RPS dynamics are thought to require stronger FD selection, the existence of which yet needs to be proved. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that two cumulative selective episodes, FD sexual selection reinforced by FD selection on offspring...

Data from: Modelling plant species distribution in alpine grasslands using airborne imaging spectroscopy

Julien Pottier, Zbyněk Malenovský, Achilleas Psomas, Lucie Homolová, Michael E. Schaepman, Philippe Choler, Wilfried Thuiller, Antoine Guisan & Niklaus E. Zimmermann
Remote sensing using airborne imaging spectroscopy (AIS) is known to retrieve fundamental optical properties of ecosystems. However, the value of these properties for predicting plant species distribution remains unclear. Here, we assess whether such data can add value to topographic variables for predicting plant distributions in French and Swiss alpine grasslands. We fitted statistical models with high spectral and spatial resolution reflectance data and tested four optical indices sensitive to leaf chlorophyll content, leaf water...

Data from: Prepupal building behavior in Drosophila melanogaster and its evolution under resource and time constraints

Sunitha Narasimha, Sylvain Kolly, Marla B. Sokolowski, Kawecki Tadeusz J., Roshan K. Vijendravarma & Tadeusz J. Kawecki
Structures built by animals are a widespread and ecologically important ‘extended phenotype’. While its taxonomic diversity has been well described, factors affecting short-term evolution of building behavior within a species have received little experimental attention. Here we describe how, given the opportunity, wandering Drosophila melanogaster larvae often build long tunnels in agar substrates and embed their pupae within them. These embedded larvae are characterized by a longer egg-to-pupariation developmental time than larvae that pupate on...

Data from: The role of climatic tolerances and seed traits in reduced extinction rates of temperate Polygonaceae

Anna Kostikova, Nicolas Salamin & Peter B. Pearman
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is one of the most striking and consistent biodiversity patterns across taxonomic groups. We investigate the species richness gradient in the buckwheat family, Polygonaceae, which exhibits a reverse LDG and is, thus, decoupled from dominant gradients of energy and environmental stability that increase towards the tropics and confound mechanistic interpretations. We test competing age and evolutionary diversification hypotheses, which may explain the diversification of this plant family over the past...

Data from: Short- and long-term effects of litter size manipulation in a small wild-derived rodent

Mikko Lehto Hürlimann, Antoine Stier, Olivier Scholly, François Crisuolo, Pierre Bize, M. Lehto Hurlimann & F. Criscuolo
Iteroparous organisms maximise their overall fitness by optimising their reproductive effort over multiple reproductive events. Hence, changes in reproductive effort are expected to have both short- and long-term consequences on parents and their offspring. In laboratory rodents, manipulation of reproductive efforts during lactation have however revealed little short-term reproductive adjustments, suggesting that female laboratory rodents might express maximal rather than optimal levels of reproductive investments as observed in semelparous organisms. Using a litter size manipulation...

Data from: MicroRNAs Shape Circadian Hepatic Gene Expression on a Transcriptome-Wide Scale

David Gatfield, Ngoc-Hien Du, Alaaddin Bulak Arpat & Mara De Matos
A considerable proportion of mammalian gene expression undergoes circadian oscillations. Post-transcriptional mechanisms likely make important contributions to mRNA abundance rhythms. We have investigated how microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to core clock and clock-controlled gene expression using mice in which miRNA biogenesis can be inactivated in the liver. While the hepatic core clock was surprisingly resilient to miRNA loss, whole transcriptome sequencing uncovered widespread effects on clock output gene expression. Cyclic transcription paired with miRNA-mediated regulation was...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    38

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    38

Affiliations

  • University of Lausanne
    38
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • University of Neuchâtel
    2
  • Institute of Biosciences and Bioresources
    2
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Grenoble Alpes University
    2
  • Uppsala University
    2