43 Works

Data from: Artificial selection on male genitalia length alters female brain size

Severine D. Buechel, Isobel Booksmythe, Alexander Kotrschal, Michael D. Jennions, Kolm Niclas & Niclas Kolm
Male harassment is a classic example of how sexual conflict over mating leads to sex-specific behavioural adaptations. Females often suffer significant costs from males attempting forced copulations, and the sexes can be in an arms race over male coercion. Yet, despite recent recognition that divergent sex-specific interests in reproduction can affect brain evolution, sexual conflict has not been addressed in this context. Here, we investigate whether artificial selection on a correlate of male success at...

Data from: Condition-dependent trade-offs between sexual traits, body condition and immunity: the effect of novel habitats

Maider Iglesias-Carrasco, Megan Head, Michael Jennions & Carlos Cabido
Background: The optimal allocation of resources to sexual signals and other life history traits is usually dependent on an individual's condition, while variation in the expression of sexual traits across environments depends on the combined effects of local adaptation, mean condition, and phenotypic responses to environment-specific cues that affect resource allocation. A clear contrast can often be drawn between natural habitats and novel habitats, such as forest plantations and urban areas. In some species, males...

Data from: Is specialization an evolutionary dead-end? Testing for differences in speciation, extinction and trait transition rates across diverse phylogenies of specialists and generalists.

Emma Day, Xia Hua, Lindell Bromham & E. H. Day
Specialization has often been claimed to be an evolutionary dead end, with specialist lineages having a reduced capacity to persist or diversify. In a phylogenetic comparative framework, an evolutionary dead end may be detectable from the phylogenetic distribution of specialists, if specialists rarely give rise to large, diverse clades. Previous phylogenetic studies of the influence of specialization on macroevolutionary processes have demonstrated a range of patterns, including examples where specialists have both higher and lower...

Data from: Bayesian estimation of the global biogeographical history of the Solanaceae

Julia Dupin, Nicholas J. Matzke, Tiina Särkinen, Sandra Knapp, Richard G. Olmstead, Lynn Bohs & Stacey D. Smith
Aim: The tomato family Solanaceae is distributed on all major continents except Antarctica and has its centre of diversity in South America. Its worldwide distribution suggests multiple long-distance dispersals within and between the New and Old Worlds. Here, we apply maximum likelihood (ML) methods and newly developed biogeographical stochastic mapping (BSM) to infer the ancestral range of the family and to estimate the frequency of dispersal and vicariance events resulting in its present-day distribution. Location:...

Data from: Predicting range-shift success potential for tropical marine fishes using external morphology

Shannen M. Smith, Rebecca J. Fox, Jennifer M. Donelson, Megan L. Head & David J. Booth
With global change accelerating the rate of species' range shifts, predicting which are most likely to establish viable populations in their new habitats is key to understanding how biological systems will respond. Annually, in Australia, tropical fish larvae from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are transported south via the East Australian Current (EAC), settling into temperate coastal habitats for the summer period, before experiencing near-100% mortality in winter. However, within 10 years, predicted winter ocean...

Data from: Phylogenomic reconstruction of sportive lemurs (genus Lepilemur) recovered from mitogenomes with inferences for Madagascar biogeography

Runhua Lei, Cynthia L. Frasier, Melissa T.R. Hawkins, Shannon E. Engberg, Carolyn A. Bailey, Steig E. Johnson, Adam T. McLain, Colin P. Groves, George H. Perry, Stephen D. Nash, Russell A. Mittermeier &
The family Lepilemuridae includes 26 species of sportive lemurs, most of which were recently described. The cryptic morphological differences confounded taxonomy until recent molecular studies; however, some species’ boundaries remain uncertain. To better understand the genus Lepilemur, we analyzed 35 complete mitochondrial genomes representing all recognized 26 sportive lemur taxa and estimated divergence dates. With our dataset we recovered 25 reciprocally monophyletic lineages, as well as an admixed clade containing Lepilemur mittermeieri and Lepilemur dorsalis....

Data from: Selection on an antagonistic behavioral trait can drive rapid genital coevolution in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides

Paul Edward Hopwood, Megan L. Head, Eleanor J. Jordan, Mauricio J. Carter, Emma Davey, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Male and female genital morphology varies widely across many taxa, and even among populations. Disentangling potential sources of selection on genital morphology is problematic because each sex is predicted to respond to adaptations in the other due to reproductive conflicts of interest. To test how variation in this sexual conflict trait relates to variation in genital morphology we used our previously developed artificial selection lines for high and low repeated mating rates. We selected for...

Data from: Egg size investment in superb fairy-wrens: helper effects are modulated by climate

Naomi E. Langmore, Liam D. Bailey, Robert G. Heinsohn, Andrew F. Russell & Rebecca M. Kilner
Natural populations might exhibit resilience to changing climatic conditions if they already show adaptive flexibility in their reproductive strategies. In cooperative breeders, theory predicts that mothers with helpers should provide less care when environmental conditions are favourable, but maintain high investment when conditions are challenging. Here, we test for evidence of climate-mediated flexibility in maternal investment in the cooperatively breeding superb fairy-wren Malurus cyaneus. We focus on egg size because in this species egg size...

Data from: Nuclear DNA based species delineations of Coccus scale insects in symbiosis with plants and ants, and the role of plant epicuticular wax in structuring associations

Swee-Peck Quek, Shouhei Ueda, Penny J. Gullan, Takumasa Kondo, Mitsuru Hattori, Takao Itioka, Kaori Murase & Takao Itino
We undertook phylogenetic analysis of nuclear DNA to elucidate species boundaries in the symbiotic Coccus scale insects associated with mutualistic Crematogaster ants and Macaranga plants occurring in the ever-wet forests of Southeast Asia. The coccid specimens clustered into ten lineages, each corresponding to a morphospecies assignment. The lineage identified as C. secretus was separated from the Main Clade by an outgroup. We also examined all pairwise associations among the three symbiont guilds to understand how...

Data from: Do female Nicrophorus vespilloides reduce direct costs by choosing males that mate less frequently?

Paul E. Hopwood, Geoffrey P. F. Mazué, Mauricio J. Carter, Megan L. Head, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Sexual conflict occurs when selection to maximize fitness in one sex does so at the expense of the other sex. In the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, repeated mating provides assurance of paternity at a direct cost to female reproductive productivity. To reduce this cost, females could choose males with low repeated mating rates or smaller, servile males. We tested this by offering females a dichotomous choice between males from lines selected for high or low...

Data from: Dynamic species co-occurrence networks require dynamic biodiversity surrogates

Ayesha I. T. Tulloch, Iadine Chadès, Yann Dujardin, Martin J. Westgate, Peter W. Lane & David Lindenmayer
In conservation it is inevitable that surrogates be selected to represent the occurrence of hard–to–find species and find priority locations for management. However, species co–occurrence can vary over time. Here we demonstrate how temporal dynamics in species co–occurrence influence the ability of managers to choose the best surrogate species. We develop an efficient optimisation formulation that selects the optimal set of complementary surrogate species from any co–occurrence network. We apply it to two Australian datasets...

Data from: Population and phylogenomic decomposition via genotyping-by-sequencing in Australian Pelargonium

Adrienne B. Nicotra, Caroline Chong, Jason G. Bragg, Chong Ren Ong, Nicola C. Aitken, Aaron Chuah, Brendan Lepschi & Justin O. Borevitz
Species delimitation has seen a paradigm shift as increasing accessibility of genomic-scale data enables separation of lineages with convergent morphological traits and the merging of recently diverged ecotypes that have distinguishing characteristics. We inferred the process of lineage formation among Australian species in the widespread and highly variable genus Pelargonium by combining phylogenomic and population genomic analyses along with breeding system studies and character analysis. Phylogenomic analysis and population genetic clustering supported seven of the...

Data from: Phylogenomics at the tips: inferring lineages and their demographic history in a tropical lizard, Carlia amax

Sally Potter, Jason G. Bragg, Benjamin M. Peter, Ke Bi & Craig Moritz
High-throughput sequencing approaches offer opportunities to better understand the evolutionary processes driving diversification, particularly in nonmodel organisms. In particular, the 100–1000's of loci that can now be sequenced are providing unprecedented power in population, speciation and phylogenetic studies. Here, we apply an exon capture approach to generate >99% complete sequence and SNP data across >2000 loci from a tropical skink, Carlia amax, and exploit these data to identify divergent lineages and infer their relationships and...

Data from: Population scale mapping of transposable element diversity reveals links to gene regulation and epigenomic variation

Tim Stuart, Steven Eichten, Jonathan Cahn, Yuliya Karpievitch, Justin Borevitz, Ryan Lister, Steven R Eichten, Justin O Borevitz & Yuliya V Karpievitch
Variation in the presence or absence of transposable elements (TEs) is a major source of genetic variation between individuals. Here, we identified 23,095 TE presence/absence variants between 216 Arabidopsis accessions. Most TE variants were rare, and we find these rare variants associated with local extremes of gene expression and DNA methylation levels within the population. Of the common alleles identified, two thirds were not in linkage disequilibrium with nearby SNPs, implicating these variants as a...

Data from: Are sexually selected traits affected by a poor environment early in life?

Regina Vega-Trejo, Michael D. Jennions & Megan L. Head
Background: Challenging conditions experienced early in life, such as a restricted diet, can detrimentally affect key life-history traits. Individuals can reduce these costs by delaying their sexual maturation, albeit at the price of the later onset of breeding, to eventually reach the same adult size as individuals that grow up in a benevolent environment. Delayed maturation can, however, still lead to other detrimental morphological and physiological changes that become apparent later in adulthood (e.g. shorter...

Data from: Parental thermal environment alters offspring sex ratio and fitness in an oviparous lizard

Lisa E. Schwanz
The environment experienced by parents can impact the phenotype of their offspring (parental effects), a critical component of organismal ecology and evolution in variable or changing environments. Although temperature is a central feature of the environment for ectotherms, its role in parental effects has been little explored until recently. Here, parental basking opportunity was manipulated in an oviparous lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination, the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus). Eggs were incubated at a temperature that...

Data from: Global ecological success of Thalassoma fishes in extreme coral reef habitats

Christopher J. Fulton, Peter C. Wainwright, Andrew S. Hoey & David R. Bellwood
Phenotypic adaptations can allow organisms to relax abiotic selection and facilitate their ecological success in challenging habitats, yet we have relatively little data for the prevalence of this phenomenon at macroecological scales. Using data on the relative abundance of coral reef wrasses and parrotfishes (f. Labridae) spread across three ocean basins and the Red Sea, we reveal the consistent global dominance of extreme wave-swept habitats by fishes in the genus Thalassoma, with abundances up to...

Data from: Topology, divergence dates, and macroevolutionary inferences vary between different tip-dating approaches applied to fossil theropods (Dinosauria)

David W. Bapst, April M. Wright, Nick J. Matzke & Graeme T. Lloyd
Dated phylogenies of fossil taxa allow palaeobiologists to estimate the timing of major divergences and placement of extinct lineages, and to test macroevolutionary hypotheses. Recently developed Bayesian ‘tip-dating’ methods simultaneously infer and date the branching relationships among fossil taxa, and infer putative ancestral relationships. Using a previously published dataset for extinct theropod dinosaurs, we contrast the dated relationships inferred by several tip-dating approaches and evaluate potential downstream effects on phylogenetic comparative methods. We also compare...

Data from: Getting a head in hard soils: convergent skull evolution and divergent allometric patterns explain shape variation in a highly diverse genus of pocket gophers (Thomomys)

Ariel E. Marcy, Elizabeth A. Hadly, Emma Sherratt, Kathleen Garland & Vera Weisbecker
Background: High morphological diversity can occur in closely related animals when selection favors morphologies that are subject to intrinsic biological constraints. A good example is subterranean rodents of the genus Thomomys, one of the most taxonomically and morphologically diverse mammalian genera. Highly procumbent, tooth-digging rodent skull shapes are often geometric consequences of increased body size. Indeed, larger-bodied Thomomys species tend to inhabit harder soils. We used geometric morphometric analyses to investigate the interplay between soil...

Data from: Resources for phylogenomic analyses of Australian terrestrial vertebrates

Jason G. Bragg, Sally Potter, Ke Bi, Renee Catullo, Stephen C. Donnellan, Mark D. B. Eldridge, Leo Joseph, J. Scott Keogh, Paul Oliver, Kevin C. Rowe & Craig Moritz
High-throughput sequencing methods promise to improve our ability to infer the evolutionary histories of lineages and to delimit species. These are exciting prospects for the study of Australian vertebrates, a group comprised of many globally unique lineages with a long history of isolation. The evolutionary relationships within many of these lineages have been difficult to resolve with small numbers of loci, and we now know that many lineages also exhibit substantial cryptic diversity. Here, we...

Data from: High adult mortality in disease-challenged frog populations increases vulnerability to drought

Benjamin C. Scheele, David A. Hunter, Sam C. Banks, Jennifer C. Pierson, Lee F. Skerratt, Rebecca Webb, Don A. Driscoll & Ben C. Scheele
Pathogen emergence can drive major changes in host population demography, with implications for population dynamics and sensitivity to environmental fluctuations. The amphibian disease chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is implicated in the severe decline of over 200 amphibian species. In species that have declined but not become extinct, Bd persists and can cause substantial ongoing mortality. High rates of mortality associated with Bd may drive major changes in host...

Data from: Social selection parapatry in Afrotropical sunbirds

Jay P. McEntee, Joshua V. Peñalba, Chacha Werema, Elia Mulungu, Maneno Mbilinyi, David Moyer, Louis Hansen, Jon Fjeldså & Rauri C. K. Bowie
The extent of range overlap of incipient and recent species depends on the type and magnitude of phenotypic divergence that separates them, and the consequences of phenotypic divergence on their interactions. Signal divergence by social selection likely initiates many speciation events, but may yield niche-conserved lineages predisposed to limit each others’ ranges via ecological competition. Here we examine this neglected aspect of social selection speciation theory in relation to the discovery of a non-ecotonal species...

Data from: Placoderms and the evolutionary origin of teeth: a comment on Rücklin & Donoghue (2015)

Carole Burrow, Yuzhi Hu & Gavin Young
Anterior supragnathal of an Early Devonian arthrodire (ANU V244)PLY file of the anterior supragnathal (ASG) of an Early Devonian arthrodire (ANU V244).ASG_LowRes.zip

Data from: Convergence across a continent: adaptive diversification in a recent radiation of Australian lizards

Mozes P. K. Blom, Paul Horner & Craig Moritz
Recent radiations are important to evolutionary biologists, because they provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms that link micro- and macroevolution. The role of ecological speciation during adaptive radiation has been intensively studied, but radiations can arise from a diversity of evolutionary processes; in particular, on large continental landmasses where allopatric speciation might frequently precede ecological differentiation. It is therefore important to establish a phylogenetic and ecological framework for recent continental-scale radiations that are species-rich...

Data from: Fitness consequences of artificial selection on relative male genital size

Isobel Booksmythe, Megan L. Head, J. Scott Keogh & Michael D. Jennions
Male genitalia often show remarkable differences among related species in size, shape and complexity. Across poeciliid fishes, the elongated fin (gonopodium) that males use to inseminate females ranges from 18 to 53% of body length. Relative genital size therefore varies greatly among species. In contrast, there is often tight within-species allometric scaling, which suggests strong selection against genital–body size combinations that deviate from a species’ natural line of allometry. We tested this constraint by artificially...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Australian National University
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  • University of Zurich
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  • University of Exeter
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  • James Cook University
    3
  • Iowa State University
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  • University of Washington
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  • University of California System
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  • University of Queensland
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  • University of Georgia
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  • University of Cambridge
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