56 Works

Data from: High intra-specific variation in avian body condition responses to climate limits generalisation across species

Nina McLean, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd & Martijn Van De Pol
It is generally assumed that populations of a species will have similar responses to climate change, and thereby that a single value of sensitivity will reflect species-specific responses. However, this assumption is rarely systematically tested. High intraspecific variation will have consequences for identifying species- or population-level traits that can predict differences in sensitivity, which in turn can affect the reliability of projections of future climate change impacts. We investigate avian body condition responses to changes...

Data from: Dating the species network: allopolyploidy and repetitive DNA evolution in American daisies (Melampodium sect. Melampodium, Asteraceae)

Jamie McCann, Tae-Soo Jang, Jiri Macas, Gerald M. Schneeweiss, Nicholas J. Matzke, Petr Novak, Tod F. Stuessy, Jose L. Villaseñor & Hanna Weiss-Schneeweiss
Allopolyploidy has played an important role in the evolution of the flowering plants. Genome mergers are often accompanied by significant and rapid alterations of genome size and structure via chromosomal rearrangements and altered dynamics of tandem and dispersed repetitive DNA families. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatic methods allow for a comprehensive investigation of the repetitive component of plant genomes. Interpretation of evolutionary dynamics following allopolyploidization requires both the knowledge of parentage and the...

Data from: New information on Brindabellaspis stensioi Young, 1980, highlights morphological disparity in Early Devonian placoderms

Benedict King, Gavin C. Young & John A. Long
Acid prepared specimens of the placoderm Brindabellaspis stensioi (Early Devonian of New South Wales, Australia) revealed placoderm endocranial anatomy in unprecedented detail. Brindabellaspis has become a key taxon in discussions of early gnathostome phylogeny, and the question of placoderm monophyly versus paraphyly. The anterior orientation of the facial nerve and related hyoid arch structures in this taxon resemble fossil osteostracans (jawless vertebrates) rather than other early gnathostomes. New specimens of Brindabellaspis now reveal the previously...

Data from: True recognition of nestlings by hosts selects for mimetic cuckoo chicks

Hee-Jin Noh, Ros Gloag & Naomi E. Langmore
Cuckoos lay their eggs in other birds’ nests, whereafter the young cuckoo hatches, ejects its nestmates, and monopolizes the care of the host parents. Theory predicts that hosts should not evolve to recognize and reject cuckoo chicks because of the risk of mistakenly imprinting on a cuckoo chick in their first brood and thereafter always rejecting their own chicks. However, recent studies have revealed some hosts do reject cuckoo chicks from the nest, indicating that...

Data from: Insular biogeographic origins and high phylogenetic distinctiveness for a recently depleted lizard fauna from Christmas Island, Australia

Paul M. Oliver, Mozes P.K. Blom, Harold G. Cogger, Robert N. Fisher, Jonathan Q. Richmond, John C.Z. Woinarski & John C. Z. Woinarski
Striking faunal turnover across Asia and Australasia, most famously along the eastern edge of the Sunda Shelf or ‘Wallace’s Line’, has been a focus of biogeographic research for over 150 years. Here we investigate the origins of a highly threatened endemic lizard fauna (4 species) on Christmas Island. Despite occurring less 350 km south of the Sunda Shelf, this fauna mostly comprises species from clades centred on the more distant regions of Wallacea, the Pacific...

Data from: Phylogenomics of a rapid radiation: the Australian rainbow skinks

Jason G. Bragg, Sally Potter, Ana C. Afonso Silva, Conrad J. Hoskin, Benjamin Y.H. Bai & Craig Moritz
Background: The application of target capture with next-generation sequencing now enables phylogenomic analyses of rapidly radiating clades of species. But such analyses are complicated by extensive incomplete lineage sorting, demanding the use of methods that consider this process explicitly, such as the multi-species coalescent (MSC) model. However, the MSC makes strong assumptions about divergence history and population structure, and when using the full Bayesian implementation, current computational limits mean that relatively few loci and samples...

Data from: Environmental resource deficit may drive the evolution of intraspecific trait variation in invasive plant populations

Shuangshuang Liu, Jared Streich, Justin O. Borevitz, Kevin J. Rice, Tingting Li, Bo Li & Kent J. Bradford
Intraspecific trait variation within natural populations (i.e. intra‐population trait variation, IPTV) is the basic source for selection and can have significant ecological consequences. Higher IPTV may increase a population's niche breath and benefit interspecies competition under a resource‐limited environment, thus affecting the ability of a species to move into novel habitats. However, the reciprocal influences of variation in environmental conditions and phenotypic trait expression in spreading plant populations are not clearly defined. We propose that...

Data from: A new actinopterygian from the Late Devonian Gogo Formation, Western Australia

Brian Choo, Jing Lu, Sam Giles, Kate Trinajstic & John A. Long
The study of early actinopterygians (ray-finned fishes) from the Devonian has been hampered by imperfect preservation in the majority of taxa. The Late Devonian (early Frasnian) Gogo Formation of north-western Western Australia is notable in producing complete fossil actinopterygians with exceptional three-dimensional preservation of both the dermal and endoskeletal anatomy. Four taxa have been described and have proved invaluable in understanding the anatomy of early representatives of this clade. Here, we present a fifth Gogo...

Data from: Taxon cycle predictions supported by model-based inference in Indo-Pacific trap-jaw ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Odontomachus)

Pável Matos-Maraví, Nicholas J. Matzke, Fredrick J. Larabee, Ronald M. Clouse, Ward C. Wheeler, Daniela Magdalena Sorger, Andrew V. Suarez & Milan Janda
Non-equilibrium dynamics and non-neutral processes, such as trait-dependent dispersal, are often missing from quantitative island biogeography models despite their potential explanatory value. One of the most influential non-equilibrium models is the taxon cycle, but it has been difficult to test its validity as a general biogeographical framework. Here, we test predictions of the taxon-cycle model using six expected phylogenetic patterns and a time-calibrated phylogeny of Indo-Pacific Odontomachus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), one of the ant genera...

Data from: The unexpected genetic mating system of the red‐backed toadlet (Pseudophryne coriacea): a species with prolonged terrestrial breeding and cryptic reproductive behaviour

Daniel M. O'Brien, J. Scott Keogh, Aimee J. Silla & Phillip G. Byrne
Molecular technologies have revolutionised our classification of animal-mating systems, yet we still know very little about the genetic-mating systems of many vertebrate groups. It is widely believed that anuran amphibians have the highest reproductive diversity of all vertebrates, yet genetic mating systems have been studied in less than one percent of all described species. Here, we use SNPs to quantify the genetic-mating system of the terrestrial breeding red-backed toadlet Pseudophryne coriacea. In this species, breeding...

Data from: Guidelines and considerations for designing field experiments simulating precipitation extremes in forest ecosystems

Heidi Asbjornsen, John L. Campbell, Katie A. Jennings, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Cameron McIntire, Pamela H. Templer, Richard P. Phillips, Taryn L. Bauerle, Michael C. Dietze, Serita D. Frey, Peter M. Groffman, Rosella Guerrieri, Paul J. Hanson, Eric P. Kelsey, Alan K. Knapp, Nathan G. McDowell, Patrick Meir, Kimberly A. Novick, Scott V. Ollinger, Will T. Pockman, Paul G. Schaberg, Stan D. Wullschleger, Melinda D. Smith & Lindsey E. Rustad
1. Context. Precipitation regimes are changing in response to climate change, yet understanding of how forest ecosystems respond to extreme droughts and pluvials remains incomplete. As future precipitation extremes will likely fall outside the range of historical variability, precipitation manipulation experiments (PMEs) are critical to advancing knowledge about potential ecosystem responses. However, few PMEs have been conducted in forests compared to short-statured ecosystems, and forest PMEs have unique design requirements and constraints. Moreover, past forest...

Data from: How to quantify (the response to) sexual selection on traits

Jonathan M. Henshaw, Michael D. Jennions & Loeske E. B. Kruuk
Natural selection operates via fitness components like mating success, fecundity and longevity, which can be understood as intermediaries in the causal process linking traits to fitness. Sexual selection occurs when traits influence mating or fertilisation success, which, in turn, influences fitness. We show how to quantify both these steps in a single path analysis, leading to better estimates of the strength of sexual selection. Our model controls for confounding variables, such as body size or...

Data from: A comprehensive and user-friendly framework for 3D-data visualisation in invertebrates and other organisms

Thomas L. Semple, Rod Peakall & Nikolai J. Tatarnic
Methods for 3D‐imaging of biological samples are experiencing unprecedented development, with tools such as X‐ray micro‐computed tomography (μCT) becoming more accessible to biologists. These techniques are inherently suited to small subjects and can simultaneously image both external and internal morphology, thus offering considerable benefits for invertebrate research. However, methods for visualising 3D‐data are trailing behind the development of tools for generating such data. Our aim in this article is to make the processing, visualisation and...

Data from: Logging and fire regimes alter plant communities

Elle J. Bowd, David B. Lindenmayer, Sam C. Banks & David P. Blair
Disturbances are key drivers of plant community composition, structure and function. Plant functional traits, including life forms and reproductive strategies are critical to the resilience and resistance of plant communities in the event of disturbance. Climate change and increasing anthropogenic disturbance are altering natural disturbance regimes, globally. When these regimes shift beyond the adaptive resilience of plant functional traits, local populations and ecosystem functions can become compromised. We tested the influence of multiple disturbances, of...

Data from: Matching symbiotic associations of an endangered orchid to habitat to improve conservation outcomes

Noushka Reiter, Ann C. Lawrie & Celeste C. Linde
Background and Aims: An understanding of mycorrhizal variation, orchid seed germination temperature and the effect of co-occurring plant species could be critical for optimising conservation translocation of endangered plants with specialised mycorrhizal associations. Methods: Focussing on the orchid Thelymitra epipactoides we isolated mycorrhizal fungi from ten plants within each of three sites; Shallow Sands Woodland (SSW), Damp Heathland (DH) and Coastal Heathland Scrub (CHS). Twenty-seven fungal isolates were tested for symbiotic germination under three temperature...

Data from: More partners, more ranges: generalist legumes spread more easily around the globe

Tia L. Harrison, Anna K. Simonsen, John R. Stinchcombe & Megan E. Frederickson
How does mutualism affect range expansion? On one hand, mutualists might thrive in new habitats thanks to the resources, stress tolerance, or defense provided by their partners. On the other, specialized mutualists might fail to find compatible partners beyond their range margins, limiting further spread. A recent global analysis of legume ranges found that non-symbiotic legumes have been successfully introduced to more ranges than legumes that form symbioses with rhizobia, but there is still abundant...

Data from: Diversification across biomes in a continental lizard radiation

Lauren G. Ashman, Jason G. Bragg, Paul Doughty, Mark Norman Hutchinson, Sarah Bank, Nick Matzke, Paul M. Oliver, Craig Moritz, N. J. Matzke & P. Oliver
Ecological opportunity is a powerful driver of evolutionary diversification, and predicts rapid lineage and phenotypic diversification following colonisation of competitor-free habitats. Alternatively, topographic or environmental heterogeneity could be key to generating and sustaining diversity. We explore these hypotheses in a widespread lineage of Australian lizards: the Gehyra variegata group. This clade occurs across two biomes: the Australian monsoonal tropics (AMT), where it overlaps a separate, larger bodied clade of Gehyra and is largely restricted to...

Data from: Transgenerational effects of maternal sexual interactions in seed beetles

Susanne R.K. Zajitschek, Damian K. Dowling, Megan L. Head, Eduardo Rodriguez-Exposito & Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez
Mating bears large costs to females, especially in species with high levels of sexual conflict over mating rates. Given the direct costs to females associated with multiple mating, which include reductions in lifespan and lifetime reproductive success, past research focused on identifying potential indirect benefits (through increases in offspring fitness) that females may accrue. Far less attention has been given to understanding how costs of sexual interactions to females may span across generations. Hence, little...

Data from: Effectiveness of camera traps for quantifying daytime and nighttime visitation by vertebrate pollinators

Siegfried L. Krauss, David G. Roberts, Ryan D. Phillips & Caroline Edwards
1. Identification of pollen vectors is a fundamental objective of pollination biology. The foraging and social behavior of these pollinators has profound effects on plant mating, making quantification of their behaviour critical for understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of different pollinators for the plants they visit. However, accurate quantification of visitation may be problematic, especially for shy animals and/or when the temporal and spatial scale of observation desired is large. Sophisticated heat- and movement-triggered...

Data from: The disproportionate importance of long-unburned forests and woodlands for reptiles

Kelly M. Dixon, Geoffrey J. Cary, Graeme L. Worboys & Philip Gibbons
1. Our understanding of the impacts of time since fire on reptiles remains limited, partly because there are relatively few locations where long-term, spatially explicit fire histories are available. Such information is important given the large proportion of some landscapes that are managed with frequent prescribed fire to meet fuel management objectives. 2. We conducted a space-for-time study across a landscape in south-east Australia where the known fire history spanned 6 months to at least...

Data from: The global geography of human subsistence

Michael C. Gavin, Patrick H. Kavanagh, Hannah J. Haynie, Claire Bowern, Carol R. Ember, Russell D. Gray, Fiona M. Jordan, Kathryn R. Kirby, Geoff Kushnick, Bobbi S. Low, Bruno Vilela & Carlos A. Botero
How humans obtain food has dramatically reshaped ecosystems and altered both the trajectory of human history and the characteristics of human societies. Our species’ subsistence varies widely, from predominantly foraging strategies, to plant-based agriculture and animal husbandry. The extent to which environmental, social, and historical factors have driven such variation is currently unclear. Prior attempts to resolve long-standing debates on this topic have been hampered by an over-reliance on narrative arguments, small and geographically-narrow samples,...

Data from: Do migratory and resident birds differ in their responses to interacting effects of climate, weather and vegetation?

David B. Lindenmayer, Peter Lane, Claire N. Foster, Martin J. Westgate, Chloe Sato, Karen Ikin, Mason Crane, Damian Michael, Dan Florance, Ben C. Scheele & Daniel Florance
Aim: Knowledge of the individual and collective effects of habitat, weather variability, and climate on bird populations is limited, with the result that species vulnerability to the collective impacts of global change is poorly understood. We quantified the effects of interactions between these potential drivers on the occurrence of resident, migratory, and nomadic birds in Australian temperate woodlands. Location: A 1.8 million hectare temperate woodland belt in south-eastern Australia. Time period: 2002-2015. Major taxa studied:...

Data from: Ageing with a silver-spoon: a meta-analysis of the effect of developmental environment on senescence

Eve B. Cooper, Loeske E.B. Kruuk & Loeske E. B. Kruuk
What determines variation between individuals in how they senesce, and are environmental conditions experienced during development relevant to late-life performance? We report a meta-analysis of studies of wild populations to determine how the quality of the environment experienced during development affects rates of survival and reproductive senescence. From studies of 14 bird or mammal species, we calculated effect sizes for the interaction between the effects of environmental quality during development and age in predicting survival...

Data from: Good parenting may not increase reproductive success under environmental extremes

Rebecca J. Fox, Megan L. Head & Iain Barber
For species exhibiting parental care, the way in which parents adjust care behaviour to compensate for environmental change potentially influences offspring survival and, ultimately, population viability. Using the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) – a species in which males provide parental care by building and tending a nest and fanning the eggs – we examined how low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels affect paternal care, embryo development and survival. While levels of nest tending were unaffected by...

Data from: The microstructure of white feathers predicts their visible and near-infrared reflectance properties

Devi Stuart-Fox, Elizabeth Newton, Raoul A. Mulder, Liliana D'Alba, Matthew D. Shawkey, Branislav Igic & Liliana D’Alba
Research on the optical properties of animal integuments, including fur, feather, skin and cuticle, has focussed almost exclusively on animal-visible wavelengths within the narrow range of 300 - 700 nm. By contrast, the near-infrared (NIR) portion of direct sunlight, spanning 700 - 2600 nm, has been largely ignored despite its potentially important thermal consequences. We quantified variation in visible and NIR reflectance and transmission for white body contour feathers of 50 bird species, and examined...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • Australian National University
    56
  • Flinders University
    5
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • Australian Museum
    3
  • Queensland Museum
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • La Trobe University
    2