3 Works

Data from: First circumglobal assessment of Southern Hemisphere humpback whale mitochondrial genetic variation and implications for management

Howard C. Rosenbaum, Francine Kershaw, Martin Mendez, Cristina Pomilla, Matthew S. Leslie, Ken P. Findlay, Peter B. Best, Timothy Collins, Michel Vely, Marcia H. Engel, Robert Baldwin, Gianna Minton, Michael Meyer, Lillian Florez-Gonzalez, M. Michael Poole, Nan Hauser, Claire Garrigue, Muriel Brasseur, John Bannister, Megan Anderson, Carlos Olavarria & C. Scott Baker
The description of genetic population structure over a species’ geographic range can provide insights into its evolutionary history and also support effective management efforts. Assessments for globally distributed species are rare, however, requiring significant international coordination and collaboration. The global distribution of demographically discrete populations for the humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae is not fully known, hampering the definition of appropriate management units. Here, we present the first circumglobal assessment of mitochondrial genetic population structure across...

Data from: Cryptic lineage diversity, body size divergence and sympatry in a species complex of Australian lizards (Gehyra)

Craig C. Moritz, Renae C. Pratt, Sarah Bank, Gayleen Bourke, Jason G. Bragg, Paul Doughty, J. Scott Keogh, Rebecca J. Laver, Sally Potter, Luisa C. Teasdale, Leonardo G. Tedeschi & Paul M. Oliver
Understanding the joint evolutionary and ecological underpinnings of sympatry among close relatives remains a key challenge in biology. This problem can be addressed through joint phylogenomic and phenotypic analysis of complexes of closely related lineages within, and across, species and hence representing the speciation continuum. For a complex of tropical geckos from northern Australia – Gehyra nana and close relatives – we combine mtDNA phylogeography, exon-capture sequencing and morphological data to resolve independently evolving lineages...

Data from: Stabilizing selection on individual pattern elements of aposematic signals

Anne E. Winters, Naomi F. Green, Nerida G. Wilson, Martin J. How, Mary J. Garson, Justin Marshall, Karen L. Cheney & N. Justin Marshall
Warning signal variation is ubiquitous but paradoxical: low variability should aid recognition and learning by predators. However, spatial variability in the direction and strength of selection for individual elements of the warning signal may allow phenotypic variation for some components, but not others. Variation in selection may occur if predators only learn particular colour pattern components rather than the entire signal. Here, we used a nudibranch mollusc, Goniobranchus splendidus, which exhibits a conspicuous red spot/white...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Western Australian Museum
    3
  • Southern Cross University
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • Smithsonian Institution
    1