6 Works

Data from: Molecular adaptation in flowering and symbiotic recognition pathways: insights from patterns of polymorphism in the legume Medicago truncatula

Stephane De Mita, Nathalie Chantret, Karine Loridon, Joelle Ronfort & Thomas Bataillon
BACKGROUND: Flowering date in annual plants, and perception of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing rhizobium in legumes, are strongly selected traits. We asked if natural selection can be detected at key genes of the flowering and rhizobia recognition pathways in the model legume Medicago truncatula. RESULTS: We examined nucleotide variation among 57 accessions from natural populations in 53 gene fragments: 11 genes involved in flowering, 5 genes involved in nitrogen-fixing bacteria recognition, and 37 genes used as control...

Data from: An evolutionary modelling approach to understanding the factors behind plant invasiveness and community susceptibility to invasion

John Warren, Chris J Topping & Penri James
Ecologists have had limited success in understanding which introduced species may become invasive. An evolutionary model is used to investigate which traits are associated with invasiveness. Translocation experiments were simulated in which species were moved into similar but evolutionary younger communities. The main findings were that species that had previously been the most abundant in their original communities have significantly higher rates of establishment than did species that had previously occurred at low abundance in...

Data from: The influence of Late Quaternary climate-change velocity on species endemism

Brody Sandel, Lars Arge, Richard G. Davies, Kevin J. Gaston, William J. Sutherland, Bo Dalsgaard & Jens-Chrisitan Svenning
The effects of climate change on biodiversity should depend in part on climate displacement rate (climate-change velocity) and its interaction with species’ capacity to migrate. We estimated Late Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate-change velocity by integrating macroclimatic shifts since the Last Glacial Maximum with topoclimatic gradients. Globally, areas with high velocities were associated with marked absences of small-ranged amphibians, mammals and birds. The association between endemism and velocity was weakest in the highly vagile birds and strongest...

Data from: The influence of Late Quaternary climate-change velocity on species endemism

Brody Sandel, Lars Arge, Richard G. Davies, Kevin J. Gaston, William J. Sutherland, Bo Dalsgaard & Jens-Chrisitan Svenning
The effects of climate change on biodiversity should depend in part on climate displacement rate (climate-change velocity) and its interaction with species’ capacity to migrate. We estimated Late Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate-change velocity by integrating macroclimatic shifts since the Last Glacial Maximum with topoclimatic gradients. Globally, areas with high velocities were associated with marked absences of small-ranged amphibians, mammals and birds. The association between endemism and velocity was weakest in the highly vagile birds and strongest...

Data from: An evolutionary modelling approach to understanding the factors behind plant invasiveness and community susceptibility to invasion

John Warren, Chris J Topping & Penri James
Ecologists have had limited success in understanding which introduced species may become invasive. An evolutionary model is used to investigate which traits are associated with invasiveness. Translocation experiments were simulated in which species were moved into similar but evolutionary younger communities. The main findings were that species that had previously been the most abundant in their original communities have significantly higher rates of establishment than did species that had previously occurred at low abundance in...

Data from: Molecular adaptation in flowering and symbiotic recognition pathways: insights from patterns of polymorphism in the legume Medicago truncatula

Stephane De Mita, Nathalie Chantret, Karine Loridon, Joelle Ronfort & Thomas Bataillon
BACKGROUND: Flowering date in annual plants, and perception of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing rhizobium in legumes, are strongly selected traits. We asked if natural selection can be detected at key genes of the flowering and rhizobia recognition pathways in the model legume Medicago truncatula. RESULTS: We examined nucleotide variation among 57 accessions from natural populations in 53 gene fragments: 11 genes involved in flowering, 5 genes involved in nitrogen-fixing bacteria recognition, and 37 genes used as control...

Registration Year

  • 2011
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Aarhus University
    6
  • Center for Massive Data Algorithmics
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of East Anglia
    2
  • Genetic Improvement and Adaptation of Mediterranean and Tropical Plants
    2
  • Institute for Sustainability
    2
  • Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences
    2
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    2