38 Works

Data from: \"Transcriptome resources for two non-model freshwater crustacean species\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 October 2014 to 30 November 2014

Mariella Baratti, Federica Cattonaro, Tiziana Di Lorenzo, Valentina Iannilli, Alessio Iannucci, Diana Maria Paola Galassi, Dragos Postolache & Giovanni Giuseppe Vendramin
The aim of this study was to characterize the whole transcriptomes of two common Mediterranean freshwater crustaceans: the copepod Eucyclops serrulatus (Fischer, 1851) and the amphipod Echinogammarus veneris Heller, 1865. Whole transcriptomic approaches may assist in studying the response to environmental pollution of species with little or no available genomic information, allowing the identification of genes involved in adaptation processes to polluted environments that can be studied in expression profile variation at a later stage....

Data from: Climate vs. topography – spatial patterns of plant species diversity and endemism on a high-elevation island

Severin D. H. Irl, David E. V. Harter, Manuel J. Steinbauer, David Gallego Puyol, José María Fernández-Palacios, Anke Jentsch & Carl Beierkuhnlein
1. Climate and topography are among the most fundamental drivers of plant diversity. Here, we assess the importance of climate and topography in explaining diversity patterns of species richness, endemic richness and endemicity on the landscape scale of an oceanic island, and evaluate the independent contribution of climatic and topographic variables to spatial diversity patterns. 2. We constructed a presence/absence matrix of perennial endemic and native vascular plant species (including subspecies) in 890 plots on...

Data from: High-arctic butterflies become smaller with rising temperatures

Joseph J. Bowden, Anne Eskildsen, Rikke R. Hansen, Kent Olsen, Carolyn M. Kurle & Toke Høye
The response of body size to increasing temperature constitutes a universal response to climate change that could strongly affect terrestrial ectotherms, but the magnitude and direction of such responses remain unknown in most species. The metabolic cost of increased temperature could reduce body size but long growing seasons could also increase body size as was recently shown in an Arctic spider species. Here, we present the longest known time series on body size variation in...

Data from: Concurrent effects of cold and hyperkalaemia cause insect chilling injury

Heath A. MacMillan, Erik Baatrup & Johannes Overgaard
Chilling injury and death are the ultimate consequence of low temperature exposure for chill susceptible insects, and low temperature tolerance is considered one of the most important factors determining insect distribution patterns. The physiological mechanisms that cause chilling injury are unknown, but chronic cold exposure that causes injury is consistently associated with elevated extracellular [K+], and cold tolerant insects possess a greater capacity to maintain ion balance at low temperatures. Here, we use the muscle...

Data from: Range-dependent flexibility in the acoustic field of view of echolocating porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)

Danuta M. Wisniewska, John M. Ratcliffe, Kristian Beedholm, Christian B. Christensen, Mark Johnson, Jens C. Koblitz, Magnus Wahlberg & Peter M. Madsen
Toothed whales use sonar to detect, locate, and track prey. They adjust emitted sound intensity, auditory sensitivity and click rate to target range, and terminate prey pursuits with high-repetition-rate, low-intensity buzzes. However, their narrow acoustic field of view (FOV) is considered stable throughout target approach, which could facilitate prey escape at close-range. Here, we show that, like some bats, harbour porpoises can broaden their biosonar beam during the terminal phase of attack but, unlike bats,...

Data from: Inbreeding depression across a nutritional stress continuum

Mads F. Schou, Volker Loeschcke & Torsten F. Kristensen
Many natural populations experience inbreeding and genetic drift as a consequence of nonrandom mating or low population size. Furthermore, they face environmental challenges that may interact synergistically with deleterious consequences of increased homozygosity and further decrease fitness. Most studies on inbreeding–environment (I-E) interactions use one or two stress levels, whereby the resolution of the possible stress and inbreeding depression interaction is low. Here we produced Drosophila melanogaster replicate populations, maintained at three different population sizes...

Data from: \"Diagnostic SNPs for inferring population structure in American mink (Neovison vison) identified through RAD sequencing\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 October 2014 to 30 November 2014

Janne Pia Thirstrup, Aritz Ruiz-Gonzalez, Jose Martin Pujolar, Peter Foged Larsen, Rasmus O. Nielsen, Ettore Randi, Andrzej Zalewski, Cino Pertoldi, Mariella Baratti, Tiziana Di Lorenzo, Alessio Iannucci, Diana Maria Paola Galassi, Valentina Iannilli, Just Jensen, Dragos Postolache & Giovanni Giuseppe Vendramin
The article documents the public availability of RAD sequencing data and generated SNPs for the American mink (Neovison vison). 224,095 polymorphic loci were identified from 14 mink from which primers were designed for a subset of 380 SNPs. The panel was tested on 211 mink. Fisher’s F-statistics (Fis, FIT and FST) as well as observed (HO), expected (HE) and unbiased expected (uHE) heterozygosity was calculated for the SNPs and 194 SNPs was validated as being...

Data from: Low evolutionary potential for egg-to-adult viability in Drosophila melanogaster at high temperatures

Torsten Nygaard Kristensen, Johannes Overgaard, Jan Lassen, Ary A. Hoffmann & Carla M. Sgro
To cope with the increasing and less predictable temperature forecasts under climate change, many terrestrial ectotherms will have to migrate or rely on adaptation through plastic or evolutionary means. Studies suggest that some ectotherms have a limited potential to change their upper thermal limits via evolutionary shifts, but research has mostly focused on adult life stages under laboratory conditions. Here we use replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster and a nested half sib/full sib quantitative genetic...

Data from: Density-dependent, central-place foraging in a grazing herbivore: competition and trade-offs in time allocation near water

David Rozen-Rechels, Floris M. Van Beest, Emmanuelle Richard, Antonio Uzal, Sarah A. Medill & Philip Dunstan McLoughlin
Optimal foraging theory addresses one of the core challenges of ecology: predicting the distribution and abundance of species. Tests of hypotheses of optimal foraging, however, often focus on a single conceptual model rather than drawing upon the collective body of theory, precluding generalization. Here we demonstrate links between two established theoretical frameworks predicting animal movements and resource use: central-place foraging and density-dependent habitat selection. Our goal is to better understand how the nature of critical,...

Data from: Establishing a community-wide DNA barcode library as a new tool for arctic research

H. Wirta, G. Várkonyi, C. Rasmussen, R. Kaartinen, N. M. Schmidt, P. D. N. Hebert, M. Barták, G. Blagoev, H. Disney, S. Ertl, P. Gjelstrup, D. J. Gwiazdowicz, L. Huldén, J. Ilmonen, J. Jakovlev, M. Jaschhof, J. Kahanpää, T. Kankaanpää, P. H. Krogh, R. Labbee, C. Lettner, V. Michelsen, S. A. Nielsen, T. R. Nielsen, L. Paasivirta … & T. Roslin
DNA sequences offer powerful tools for describing the members and interactions of natural communities. In this study, we establish the to-date most comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, including all known macroscopic animals and vascular plants of an intensively studied area of the High Arctic, the Zackenberg Valley in Northeast Greenland. To demonstrate its utility, we apply the library to identify nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals from two Malaise traps, each operated...

Data from: Nested species interactions promote feasibility over stability during the assembly of a pollinator community

Serguei Saavedra, Rudolf P. Rohr, Jens M. Olesen & Jordi Bascompte
The foundational concepts behind the persistence of ecological communities have been based on two ecological properties: dynamical stability and feasibility. The former is typically regarded as the capacity of a community to return to an original equilibrium state after a perturbation in species abundances and is usually linked to the strength of interspecific interactions. The latter is the capacity to sustain positive abundances on all its constituent species and is linked to both interspecific interactions...

Data from: Population structure, genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in perennial ryegrass populations divergently selected for freezing tolerance

Mallikarjuna Rao Kovi, Siri Fjellheim, Simen R. Sandve, Arild Larsen, Heidi Rudi, Torben Asp, Matthew Peter Kent & Odd Arne Rognli
Low temperature is one of the abiotic stresses seriously affecting the growth of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. Understanding the genetic control of freezing tolerance would aid in the development of cultivars of perennial ryegrass with improved adaptation to frost. A total number of 80 individuals (24 of High frost [HF]; 29 of Low frost [LF] and 27 of Unselected [US]) from the second generation of the two divergently selected populations and an unselected control...

Data from: Contrasting the roles of section length and instream habitat enhancement for river restoration success: a field study on 20 European restoration projects

Daniel Hering, Jukka Aroviita, Annette Baattrup-Pedersen, Karel Brabec, Tom Buijse, Frauke Ecke, Nikolai Friberg, Marek Gielczewski, Kathrin Januschke, Jan Köhler, Benjamin Kupilas, Armin W. Lorenz, Susanne Muhar, Amael Paillex, Michaela Poppe, Torsten Schmidt, Stefan Schmutz, Jan Vermaat, Piet F. M. Verdonschot, Ralf C. M. Verdonschot, Jochem Kail & Christian Wolter
1. Restoration of river hydromorphology often has limited detected effects on river biota. One frequently discussed reason is that the restored river length is insufficient to allow populations to develop and give the room for geomorphologic processes to occur. 2. We investigated ten pairs of restored river sections of which one was a large project involving a long, intensively restored river section and one represented a smaller restoration effort. The restoration effect was quantified by...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    38

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    38

Affiliations

  • Aarhus University
    38
  • Aalborg University
    5
  • VU University Amsterdam
    2
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2
  • University of California, San Diego
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Polish Academy of Sciences
    2
  • University of Gothenburg
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • University of St Andrews
    2