167 Works

Data from: Leaf litter species identity alters the structure of pond communities

Aaron B. Stoler & Rick A. Relyea
The input of leaf litter resources is a major driver of ecosystem processes in terrestrial and freshwater habitats. Although variation exists in the quantity and composition of litter inputs due to natural and anthropogenic causes, few studies have examined how such variation influences the structure and composition of aquatic food webs. Using outdoor mesocosms, we examined the bottom–up effects of 10 chemically distinct tree litter species on microbial, algal, invertebrate and vertebrate fauna found in...

Data from: Geographic patterns of genetic variation in three genomes of North American diploid strawberries with special reference to Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata

Lauren Stanley, Nicole J. Forrester, Rajanikanth Govindarajulu, Aaron Liston & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Geographic patterns of genetic variation in wild species reflect the interplay of ecological and evolutionary processes. We assessed genetic variation in three genomes across four North American diploid strawberry taxa, with special emphasis on the gynodioecious Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata (A.Heller) Staudt. Specifically, we sequenced one chloroplast (rpoC2) and two mitochondrial (atp8 and atp8-orf225) genes along with several nuclear microsatellite markers. In addition, we assessed indicators of breeding system (pollen viability and female frequency) for...

Data from: Animal personality in a foundation species drives community divergence and collapse in the wild

Jonathan N. Pruitt & Andreas P. Modlmeier
1. Despite thousands of papers on the topic, precious few of the studies on animal personality have considered the role of personality in shaping community-level processes. Here, we test the effect of individual variation on the long-term trajectories of biological communities, from initiation to their demise. The spider Anelosimus studiosus builds webs that serve as habitat for >50 species of spider, which together construct a species-rich silken reef. This species also exhibits a temporally consistent...

Data from: Phylogeny meets ecotoxicology: evolutionary patterns of sensitivity to a common insecticide

John I. Hammond, Devin K. Jones, Patrick R. Stephens & Rick A. Relyea
Pesticides commonly occur in aquatic systems and pose a substantial challenge to the conservation of many taxa. Ecotoxicology has traditionally met this challenge by focusing on short-term, single-species tests and conducting risk assessments based on the most sensitive species tested. Rarely have ecotoxicology data been examined from an evolutionary perspective and to our knowledge there has never been a phylogenetic analysis of sensitivity, despite the fact that doing so would provide insights into patterns of...

Data from: Clinal variation in seed traits influencing life cycle timing in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Alicia Montesinos-Navarro, F. Xavier Picó & Stephen J. Tonsor
Early life history transitions are crucial determining lifetime survival and fecundity. Adaptive evolution in early life history traits involves a complex interplay between the developing plant and its current and future environments. We examined the plant’s earliest life history traits, dissecting an integrated suite of pre-germination processes: primary dormancy, thermal induction of secondary dormancy, and seasonal germination response. We examined genetic variation in the three processes, genetic correlations among the processes, and the scaling of...

Data from: Selection for collective aggressiveness favors social susceptibility in social spiders

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Colin M. Wright, James L. L. Lichtenstein, Gregory T. Chism, Brendan L. McEwen, Ambika Kamath & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Particularly socially influential individuals are present in many groups, but it is unclear whether their emergence is determined by their social influence versus the social susceptibility of others. The social spider Stegodyphus dumicola shows regional variation in apparent leader-follower dynamics. We use this variation to evaluate the relative contributions of leader social influence versus follower social susceptibility in driving this social order. Using chimeric colonies that combine potential leaders and followers, we discover that leader-follower...

Data from: Developmental instability is genetically correlated with phenotypic plasticity, constraining heritability, and fitness

Stephen J. Tonsor, Tarek W. Elnaccash & Samuel M. Scheiner
Although adaptive plasticity would seem always to be favored by selection, it occurs less often than expected. This lack of ubiquity suggests that there must be trade-offs, costs, or limitations associated with plasticity. Yet, few costs have been found. We explore one type of limitation, a correlation between plasticity and developmental instability, and use quantitative genetic theory to show why one should expect a genetic correlation. We test that hypothesis using the Landsberg erecta ×...

Data from: Revisiting protein aggregation as pathogenic in sporadic Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases

Alberto J. Espay, Joaquin A. Vizcarra, Luca Marsili, Anthony E. Lang, David K. Simon, Aristide Merola, Keith A. Josephs, Alfonso Fasano, Francesca Morgante, Rodolfo Savica, J. Timothy Greenamyre, Franca Cambi, Tritia R. Yamasaki, Caroline M. Tanner, Ziv Gan-Or, Irene Litvan, Ignacio F. Mata, Cyrus P. Zabetian, Patrik Brundin, Hubert H. Fernandez, David G. Standaert, Marcelo A. Kauffman, Michael A. Schwarzschild, S. Pablo Sardi, Todd Sherer … & James B. Leverenz
The gold standard for a definitive diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the pathologic finding of aggregated alpha-synuclein into Lewy bodies and for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) aggregated amyloid into plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau into tangles. Implicit in this clinico-pathologic-based nosology is the assumption that pathological protein aggregation at autopsy reflect pathogenesis at disease onset. While these aggregates may in exceptional cases be on a causal pathway in humans (e.g., aggregated alpha-synuclein in SNCA gene multiplication...

Data from: GloPL, a global data base on pollen limitation of plant reproduction

Joanne. M. Bennett, Janette. A. Steets, Jean. H. Burns, Walter Durka, Jana. C. Vamosi, Gerardo Arceo-Gómez, Martin Burd, Laura. A. Burkle, Allan. G Ellis, Leandro Freitas, Junmin Li, James. G. Rodger, Marina Wolowski, Jing Xia, Tia-Lynn Ashman & Tiffany. M. Knight
Plant reproduction relies on transfer of pollen from anthers to stigmas, and the majority of flowering plants depend on biotic or abiotic agents for this transfer. A key metric for characterizing if pollen receipt is insufficient for reproduction is pollen limitation, which is assessed by pollen supplementation experiments. In a pollen supplementation experiment, fruit or seed production by flowers exposed to natural pollination is compared to that following hand pollination either by pollen supplementation (i.e....

Data from: Associative learning of flowers by generalist bumble bees can be mediated by microbes on the petals

Avery L. Russell & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Communication is often vital to the maintenance of mutualisms. In plant-pollinator mutualisms, plants signal pollinators via floral displays, composed of olfactory, visual, and other plant-derived cues. While plants are understood to be associated with microbes, only recently has the role of microbial (yeast and bacteria) inhabitants of flowers as intermediaries of plant-pollinator communication been recognized. Animals frequently use microbial cues to find resources, yet no study has examined whether microbes directly mediate learned and innate...

Data from: Delimiting Species Using DNA and Morphological Variation and Discordant Species Limits in Spiny Lizards (Sceloporus)

John J. Wiens & Tonya A. Penkrot
Haplotype phylogenies based on DNA sequence data are increasingly being used to test traditional species-level taxonomies based on morphology. However, few studies have critically compared species limits based on morphological and DNA data, and the methods used to delimit species using either type of data are only rarely explained. In this paper, we review three approaches for species delimitation (tree-based with DNA data and tree-based and character-based with morphological data) and propose explicit protocols for...

Data from: Extremely long-distance seed dispersal by an overfished Amazonian frugivore

Jill T. Anderson, Tim Nuttle, Joe S. Saldaña Rojas, Thomas H. Pendergast, Alexander S. Flecker, A. S. Flecker, J. T. Anderson, T. H. Pendergast & T. Nuttle
Throughout Amazonia, overfishing has decimated populations of fruit-eating fishes, especially the largebodied characid, Colossoma macropomum. During lengthy annual floods, frugivorous fishes enter vast Amazonian floodplains, consume massive quantities of fallen fruits and egest viable seeds. Many tree and liana species are clearly specialized for icthyochory, and seed dispersal by fish may be crucial for the maintenance of Amazonian wetland forests. Unlike frugivorous mammals and birds, little is known about seed dispersal effectiveness of fishes. Extensive...

Data from: Analysis of inbreeding depression in mixed-mating plants provides evidence for selective interference and stable mixed mating

Alice A Winn, Elizabeth Elle, Susan Kalisz, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G Eckert, Carol Goodwillie, Mark O. Johnston, David A Moeller, Richard H Ree, Risa D Sargent & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Hermaphroditic individuals can produce both selfed and outcrossed progeny, termed mixed mating. General theory predicts that mixed-mating populations should evolve quickly toward high rates of selfing, driven by rapid purging of genetic load and loss of inbreeding depression (ID), but the substantial number of mixed-mating species observed in nature calls this prediction into question. Greater average ID reported for selfing than for outcrossing populations is consistent with purging and suggests that mixed-mating taxa in evolutionary...

Data from: Behavioral types of predator and prey jointly determine prey survival: potential implications for the maintenance of within species behavioral variation

Jonathan N. Pruitt, John J. Stachowicz & Andrew Sih
Recent studies in animal behavior have emphasized the ecological importance of individual variation in behavioral types (e.g. boldness, activity). Such studies have emphasized how variation in one species affects its interaction with other species. But few (if any) studies simultaneously examine variation in multiple interacting species, despite the potential for coevolutionary responses to work to either maintain or eliminate variation in interacting populations. Here, we investigate how individual differences in behavioral types of both predators...

Data from: Public sharing of research datasets: a pilot study of associations

Heather A. Piwowar & Wendy W. Chapman
The public sharing of primary research datasets potentially benefits the research community but is not yet common practice. In this pilot study, we analyzed whether data sharing frequency was associated with funder and publisher requirements, journal impact factor, or investigator experience and impact. Across 397 recent biomedical microarray studies, we found investigators were more likely to publicly share their raw dataset when their study was published in a high-impact journal and when the first or...

Data from: Who shares? Who doesn’t? Factors associated with openly archiving raw research data

Heather A. Piwowar
Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn’t, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets...

Data from: Eutrophication and predation risk interact to affect sexual trait expression and mating success

Rickey Duane Cothran, Andy R Stiff, Punidan D Jeyasingh & Rick A Relyea
Sexual traits are especially sensitive to low food resources. Other environmental parameters (e.g., predation) should also affect sexual trait expression by favoring investment in viability traits rather than sexual traits. We know surprisingly little about how predators alter investment in sexual traits, or how predator and resource environments interact to affect sexual trait investment. We explored how increasing phosphorous (P) availability, at a level mimicking cultural eutrophication, affects the development of sexual, non-sexual, and viability...

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  • Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
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  • Cluster of Excellence livMatS, Freiburg Center for Interactive Materials and Bioinspired Technologies, University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 105, 79110 Freiburg, Germany
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