11 Works

Data from: Correlations of behavioral deficits with brain pathology assessed through longitudinal MRI and histopathology in the HDHQ150/Q150 mouse model of Huntington's disease

Ivan Rattray, Edward J. Smith, William R. Crum, Thomas J. Walker, Richard Gale, Gillian P. Bates, Mike Modo & Michel Modo
A variety of mouse models have been developed that express mutant huntingtin (mHTT) leading to aggregates and inclusions that model the molecular pathology observed in Huntington’s disease. Here we show that although homozygous HdhQ150 knock-in mice developed motor impairments (rotarod, locomotor activity, grip strength) by 36 weeks of age, cognitive dysfunction (swimming T maze, fear conditioning, odor discrimination, social interaction) was not evident by 94 weeks. Concomitant to behavioral assessments, T2-weighted MRI volume measurements indicated...

Data from: The effect of keystone individuals on collective outcomes can be mediated through interactions or behavioral persistence

Noa Pinter-Wollman, Carl Nick Keiser, Roy Wollman & Jonathan Pruitt
Collective behavior emerges from interactions among group members who often vary in their behavior. The presence of just one or a few keystone individuals, such as leaders or tutors, may have a large effect on collective outcomes. These individuals can catalyze behavioral changes in other group members, thus altering group composition and collective behavior. The influence of keystone individuals on group function may lead to trade-offs between ecological situations, because the behavioral composition they facilitate...

Data from: Poison frog color morphs express assortative mate preferences in allopatry but not sympatry

Yusan Yang, Corinne L. Richards-Zawacki, Anisha Devar & Matthew B. Dugas
The concurrent divergence of mating traits and preferences is necessary for the evolution of reproductive isolation via sexual selection, and such coevolution has been demonstrated in diverse lineages. However, the extent to which assortative mate preferences are sufficient to drive reproductive isolation in nature is less clear. Natural contact zones between lineages divergent in traits and preferences provide exceptional opportunities for testing the predicted evolutionary consequences of such divergence. The strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio)...

Data from: Behavioural hypervolumes of spider communities predict community performance and disbandment

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Daniel I. Bolnick, Andrew Sih, Nicholas DiRienzo & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Trait-based ecology argues that an understanding of the traits of interactors can enhance the predictability of ecological outcomes. We examine here whether the multidimensional behavioural-trait diversity of communities influences community performance and stability in situ. We created experimental communities of web-building spiders, each with an identical species composition. Communities contained one individual of each of five different species. Prior to establishing these communities in the field, we examined three behavioural traits for each individual spider....

Data from: Personality composition alters the transmission of cuticular bacteria in social groups

Carl N. Keiser, Kimberly A. Howell, Noa Pinter-Wollman & Jonathan N. Pruitt
The initial stages of a disease outbreak can determine the magnitude of an epidemic. Though rarely tested in unison, two factors with important consequences for the infectious transmission dynamics are the traits of the susceptible population and the traits of the index case (i.e., “patient zero”). Here, we test whether the behavioural composition of a social group can explain horizontal transmission dynamics of cuticular bacteria using a social spider. We exposed focal spiders of known...

Data from: Life history trait divergence among populations of a non-palatable species reveals strong non-trophic indirect effects of an abundant herbivore

Christopher D. Heckel & Susan Kalisz
When large herbivores exert selection on their prey plant species, co-occurring, non-prey species may experience selection through non-trophic indirect effects. Such selection is likely common where herbivores are overabundant. Yet, empirical studies of non-trophic indirect effects as drivers of non-prey trait evolution are lacking. Here we test for adaptive shifts in life history traits in an unpalatable species, Arisaema triphyllum, a common forest perennial that is unique because it exhibits size-dependent sex switching. We collected...

Data from: Discovery of metabolic biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy within a natural history study

Simina M. Boca, Maki Nishida, Michael Harris, Shruti Rao, Amrita K. Cheema, Kirandeep Gill, Haeri Seol, Lauren P. Morgenroth, Erik Henricson, Craig McDonald, Jean K. Mah, Paula R. Clemens, Eric P. Hoffman, Yetrib Hathout & Subha Madhavan
Serum metabolite profiling in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may enable discovery of valuable molecular markers for disease progression and treatment response. Serum samples from 51 DMD patients from a natural history study and 22 age-matched healthy volunteers were profiled using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for discovery of novel circulating serum metabolites associated with DMD. Fourteen metabolites were found significantly altered (1% false discovery rate) in their levels between DMD patients and healthy...

Data from: The Achilles' heel hypothesis: misinformed keystone individuals impair collective learning and reduce group success

Jonathan Pruitt, Colin Wright, Carl Keiser, Alexander DeMarco, Matt Grobis, Noa Pinter-Wollman, Matthew M. Grobis, Alex E. DeMarco, Carl N. Keiser, Jonathan N. Pruitt & Colin M. Wright
Many animal societies rely on highly influential keystone individuals for proper functioning. When information quality is important for group success, such keystone individuals have the potential to diminish group performance if they possess inaccurate information. Here we test whether information quality (accurate or inaccurate) influences collective outcomes when keystone individuals are the first to acquire it. We trained keystone or generic individuals to attack or avoid novel stimuli and implanted these seed individuals within groups...

Data from: Individual differences in boldness influence patterns of social interactions and the transmission of cuticular bacteria among group-mates

Carl N. Keiser, Noa Pinter-Wollman, David A. Augustine, Michael J. Ziemba, Lingran Hao, Jeffrey G. Lawrence & Jonathan N. Pruitt
Despite the importance of host attributes for the likelihood of associated microbial transmission, individual variation is seldom considered in studies of wildlife disease. Here, we test the influence of host phenotypes on social network structure and the likelihood of cuticular bacterial transmission from exposed individuals to susceptible group-mates using female social spiders (Stegodyphus dumicola). Based on the interactions of resting individuals of known behavioural types, we assessed whether individuals assorted according to their behavioural traits....

Data from: Behavioral hypervolumes of predator groups and predator-predator interactions shape prey survival rates and selection on prey behavior

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Kimberley Howell, Shaniqua Gladney, Yusan Yang, James L. L. Lichtenstein, Michelle Elise Spicer, Sebastian A. Echeverri & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Predator-prey interactions often vary on the basis of the traits of the individual predators and prey involved. Here we examine whether the multidimensional behavioral diversity of predator groups shapes prey mortality rates and selection on prey behavior. We ran individual sea stars (Pisaster ochraceus) through three behavioral assays to characterize individuals’ behavioral phenotype along three axes. We then created groups that varied in the volume of behavioral space that they occupied. We further manipulated the...

Data from: Invasion status and phylogenetic relatedness predict cost of heterospecific pollen receipt: implications for native biodiversity decline

Gerardo Arceo-Gómez & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Understanding the mechanisms by which invasive species affect native plants is a central challenge. Invasive plants have been shown to reduce pollinator visitation to natives and increase pollen quantity limitation. However, visitation and conspecific pollen delivery are only two components of the pollination process; post-pollination interactions on the stigma (heterospecific pollen [HP] receipt) could intensify pre-pollination responses to invasion. Here we used meta-analysis to test the hypotheses that invasive plants are more detrimental as HP...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Pittsburgh
    11
  • McMaster University
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • University of California Los Angeles
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • Georgetown University Medical Center
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • George Washington University
    1
  • University of California, San Diego
    1