149 Works

The skeletomuscular system of the mesosoma of Formica rufa workers (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

Lazzat Aibekova, Brendon Boudinot, Rolf Beutel, Adrian Richter, Roberto Keller, Francisco Hita Garcia & Evan Economo
The mesosoma is the power core of the ant, containing critical structural and muscular elements for the movement of the head, legs, and metasoma. It has been hypothesized that adaptation to ground locomotion and the loss of flight led to the substantial rearrangements in the mesosoma in worker ants, and that it is likely the ant mesosoma has undergone functional modifications as ants diversified into different ecological and behavioral niches. Despite this importance, studies on...

Household composition, income and assets survey data (including environmental product collection) from Mabalane, Gurue and Marrupa districts, Mozambique in 2014 and 2015

F. Vollmer, J. Fisher, C.M. Ryan, S. Baumert, E. Woollen, A. Luz, I. Cossa, R. Stedham & H. Smith
This dataset includes data collected as part of the Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services (ACES) project on the composition, income (including consumption and sale of environmental resources), ownership of assets (e.g. farming equipment, household furnishings and own transport) and wellbeing of respondent households in rural Mozambique. Data are also included from a participatory wealth ranking exercise carried out in each village. Data were collected in a total of 27 villages: 7 villages in Mabalane District...

Data from: Laboratory selection quickly erases historical differentiation

Inês Fragata, Pedro Simões, Miguel Lopes-Cunha, Margarida Lima, Bárbara Kellen, Margarida Bárbaro, Josiane Santos, Michael R. Rose, Mauro Santos & Margarida Matos
The roles of history, chance and selection have long been debated in evolutionary biology. Though uniform selection is expected to lead to convergent evolution between populations, contrasting histories and chance events might prevent them from attaining the same adaptive state, rendering evolution somewhat unpredictable. The predictability of evolution has been supported by several studies documenting repeatable adaptive radiations and convergence in both nature and laboratory. However, other studies suggest divergence among populations adapting to the...

Data from: Mapping beta diversity from space: Sparse Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM) for analysing high-dimensional data

Pedro J. Leitão, Stefan Suess, Marcel Schwieder, Inês Catry, Edward Milton, Francisco Moreira, Patrick E. Osborne, Manuel J. Pinto, Sebastian Van Der Linden, Patrick Hostert & Edward J. Milton
1. Spatial patterns of community composition turnover (beta diversity) may be mapped through Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (GDM). While remote sensing data are adequate to describe these patterns, the often high-dimensional nature of these data poses some analytical challenges, potentially resulting in loss of generality. This may hinder the use of such data for mapping and monitoring beta-diversity patterns. 2. This study presents Sparse Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM), a methodological framework designed to improve the use...

Data from: Effects of forest certification on the ecological condition of Mediterranean streams

Filipe S. Dias, Miguel N. Bugalho, Patricia M. Rodríguez-González, António Albuquerque & Jorge Orestes Cerdeira
1. Forest certification, a proxy for sustainable forest management, covers more than 10% of the world's forests. Under forest certification, forest managers and landowners must comply with environmental, economic and social management standards aiming to promote forest conservation. Despite an increasing area of certified forests, there is a dearth of data on how forest certification is affecting the conservation of forest ecosystems and associated habitats. 2. Here we assess the effects of Forest Stewardship Council...

Data from: Quantifying population size of migrant birds at stopover sites: combining count data with stopover length estimated from stable isotope analysis

Teresa Catry, Pedro Miguel Lourenço & Jose Pedro Granadeiro
1. Regular counts of migrating animals at stopover sites have been used as a measure of site importance at the global scale as well as for monitoring long-term population changes. However, migratory passage can last for several weeks and the turnover rate of individuals is often high, preventing the use of peak counts to estimate the total number of migrants. This estimate can be achieved, however, by combining count data with information on stopover length....

Data from: Tracking global change using lichen diversity: towards a global-scale ecological indicator

Paula Matos, Linda Geiser, Amanda Hardman, Doug Glavich, Pedro Pinho, Alice Nunes, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares, Cristina Branquinho & Amadeu M.V.M. Soares
Lichens have been used to efficiently track major drivers of global change from the local to regional scale since the beginning of the industrial revolution (sulphur dioxide) to the present (nitrogen deposition and climate change). Currently, the challenge is to universalize monitoring methodologies to compare global change drivers’ simultaneous and independent effects on ecosystems and to assess the efficacy of mitigation measures. Because two protocols are now used at a continental scale North America (US)...

Data from: The abundance and distribution of guilds of riparian woody plants change in response to land use and flow regulation

Francisca C. Aguiar, Pedro Segurado, Maria João Martins, Maria Dolores Bejarano, Christer Nilsson, Maria Manuela Portela & David M. Merritt
1. Many riparian ecosystems in Mediterranean Europe are affected by land use and flow alteration by dams. We focused on understanding how these stressors and their components affect riparian forests in the region. We asked: (i) are there well-defined, responsive riparian guilds?; (ii) do dam-induced stream flows determine abundance and distribution of riparian guilds? and (iii) what are the main drivers governing composition and cover of riparian guilds in regulated rivers? 2. We inventoried the...

Data from: Species tree of a recent radiation: the subfamily Delphininae (Cetacea, Mammalia)

Ana R. Amaral, Jennifer A. Jackson, Luciana M. Moller, Luciano B. Beheregaray & M. Manuela Coelho
Lineages undergoing rapid radiations provide exceptional opportunities for studying speciation and adaptation, but also represent a challenge for molecular systematics because retention of ancestral polymorphisms and the occurrence of hybridization can obscure relationships among lineages. Dolphins in the subfamily Delphininae are one such case. Non-monophyly, rapid speciation events, and discordance between morphological and molecular characters have made the inference of phylogenetic relationships within this subfamily very difficult. Here we approach this problem by applying multiple...

Data from: Microsites of seed arrival: spatio-temporal variations in complex seed-disperser networks

Ana I. García-Cervigón, Magdalena Zywiec, Miguel Delibes, Alberto Suárez-Esteban, Ramon Perea & Jose M. Fedriani
Microsites where seeds arrive during the dispersal process determine plant reproductive success, affecting the quality of dispersal. Despite their crucial role for plant recruitment, very few studies have addressed spatio-temporal variations in microsites of seed arrival in complex seed-disperser networks. Using an endozoochorous dispersal system, we characterized the microsites of seed arrival of eight fleshy-fruited plant species dispersed by five mammal species during two consecutive seasons across three sites in a Mediterranean environment (n =...

Data from: Contrasting plant water-use responses to groundwater depth in coastal dune ecosystems

Cristina Antunes, Mari Cruz Díaz Barradas, María Zunzunegui, Simone Vieira, Ângela Pereira, Andreia Anjos, Otília Correia, Maria João Pereira & Cristina Máguas
1.Groundwater lowering can produce dramatic changes in the physiological performance and survival of plant species. The impact of decreasing water availability due to climate change and anthropogenic groundwater extraction on coastal dune ecosystems has become of increasing concern, with uncertainties about how vegetation will respond in both the short and long terms. 2.We aimed to evaluate the water‐use responses of different plant functional types to increasing groundwater table depth and how this would affect their...

Data from: Sauropod tooth morphotypes from the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin (Portugal)

Pedro Mocho, Rafael Royo-Torres, Elisabete Malafaia, Fernando Escaso & Francisco Ortega
The Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin has yielded an important fossil record of sauropods, but little information is available about the tooth morphotypes represented in this region. A large sample of teeth, both unpublished and published, is described and discussed here. Four main tooth morphologies are identified: spatulate, heart-shaped, pencil-shaped, and compressed cone-chisel-shaped. Heart-shaped teeth are considered to be exclusive to a non-neosauropod eusauropod, tentatively referred to Turiasauria. The spatulate teeth can be attributed...

Data from: Lichen traits responding to aridity

Paula Matos, Pedro Pinho, Gregorio Aragón, Isabel Martinez, Alice Nunes, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares & Cristina Branquinho
1. Climate change is expected to cause several impacts at the global scale and drylands will be among the most affected areas. Thus, investigating how these changes will affect the composition, structure and functioning of dryland ecosystems has become a priority. From an ecological indicator point of view, several works have shown that functional diversity is better than species richness to understand ecosystem functioning or response to environmental factors. However most of these works focus...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding for high-throughput monitoring of estuarine macrobenthic communities

Jorge Lobo, Shadi Shokralla, Maria Helena Costa, Mehrdad Hajibabaei & Filipe Costa
Morphology-based profiling of benthic communities has been extensively applied to aquatic ecosystems' health assessment. However, it remains a low-throughput, and sometimes ambiguous, procedure. Despite DNA metabarcoding has been applied to marine benthos, a comprehensive approach providing species-level identifications for estuarine macrobenthos is still lacking. Here we report a combination of experimental and field studies to assess the aptitude of COI metabarcoding to provide robust species-level identifications for high-throughput monitoring of estuarine macrobenthos. To investigate the...

A framework for mapping the distribution of seabirds by integrating tracking, demography and phenology

Ana P. B. Carneiro, Elizabeth J. Pearmain, Steffen Oppel, Thomas A. Clay, Richard A. Phillips, Anne-Sophie Bonnet-Lebrun, Ross M. Wanless, Edward Abraham, Yvan Richard, Joel Rice, Jonathan Handley, Tammy E. Davies, Ben J. Dilley, Peter G. Ryan, Cleo Small, Javier Arata, John P. Y. Arnould, Elizabeth Bell, Leandro Bugoni, Letizia Campioni, Paulo Catry, Jaimie Cleeland, Lorna Deppe, Graeme Elliott, Amanda Freeman … & Maria P. Dias
1. The identification of geographic areas where the densities of animals are highest across their annual cycles is a crucial step in conservation planning. In marine environments, however, it can be particularly difficult to map the distribution of species, and the methods used are usually biased towards adults, neglecting the distribution of other life-history stages even though they can represent a substantial proportion of the total population. 2. Here we develop a methodological framework for...

Data from: Population-specific effect of Wolbachia on the cost of fungal infection in spider mites

Flore Zélé, Mustafa Altintas, Inês Santos, Ibrahim Cakmak & Sara Magalhães
Many studies have revealed the ability of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia to protect its arthropod hosts against diverse pathogens. However, as Wolbachia may also increase the susceptibility of its host to infection, predicting the outcome of a particular Wolbachia-host-pathogen interaction remains elusive. Yet, understanding such interactions and their eco-evolutionary consequences is crucial for disease and pest control strategies. Moreover, how natural Wolbachia infections affectartificially introduced pathogens for biocontrol has never been studied. Tetranychus urticae spider...

eDNA in a bottleneck: obstacles to fish metabarcoding studies in megadiverse freshwater systems

Jake Jackman, Chiara Benvenuto, Ilaria Coscia, Cintia Carvalho, Jonathan Ready, Jean Boubli, William Magnusson, Allan McDevitt & Naiara Sales
The current capacity of environmental DNA (eDNA) to provide accurate insights into the biodiversity of megadiverse regions (e.g., the Neotropics) requires further evaluation to ensure its reliability for long-term monitoring. In this study, we first evaluated the taxonomic resolution capabilities of a short fragment from the 12S rRNA gene widely used in fish eDNA metabarcoding studies, and then compared eDNA metabarcoding data from water samples with traditional sampling using nets. For the taxonomic discriminatory power...

Data from: \"De novo assembled transcriptome of organs involved in reproduction in an endangered endemic Iberian cyprinid fish (Squalius pyrenaicus)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 June 2015 to 31 July 2015

Miguel P. Machado, Joana Pinho, Ana R. Grosso, Manfred Schartl, Maria M. Coelho, C. Vilas, Wolfgang Arthofer, Alexander Rief, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Julia Seeber, Florian M. Steiner, D. Conklin, A. Estonba, J. Langa & I. Montes
Sex determination systems are diverse, especially among fish, and include genetic and/or environmental components. Unexpectedly for such a basic aspect of development, sex determination systems change rapidly during evolution and gonadal fate is not ultimate, being actively maintained lifelong. Here, sequences of expressed genes involved in maintenance of gonad identity and reproduction processes were obtained through transcriptome assembly of the brain-gonadal axis tissues of a freshwater fish inhabiting highly variable environments, the gonochoristic Iberian fish...

Data from: Non-trophic plant-animal interactions mediate positive density dependence among conspecific saplings

Magdalena Żywiec, Jose M. Fedriani, Przemysław Kurek & Jan Holeksa
Trophic plant-animal interactions (e.g. browsing by ungulates, insect attack) are an important and well-studied source of mortality in many tree populations. Non-trophic tree-animal interactions (e.g. deer antler rubbing) also frequently lead to tree death, and thus have significant effects on forest ecosystem functioning, but they are much less well studied than trophic interactions are. As deer populations have increased in recent decades in the Northern Hemisphere, their impact on tree populations via browsing and antler...

Data from: Deep mitochondrial introgression and hybridization among ecologically divergent vole species

Cristiane Bastos-Silveira, Sara M. Santos, Rita Monarca, Maria Da Luz Mathias & Gerald Heckel
The completion of speciation is typically difficult to ascertain in rapidly diverging taxa but the amount of hybridization and gene flow in sympatry or parapatry contains important information about the level of reproductive isolation achieved. Here we examined the progress in speciation between the Mediterranean (Microtus duodecimcostatus) and the Lusitanian pine vole (M. lusitanicus) which are part of the most rapid radiation of species known in mammals. These two Iberian pine voles are classified as...

Data from: From nature to the labratory: the impact of founder effects in adaptation

Josiane Santos, Marta Pascual, Pedro Simões, Inês Fragata, Margarida Lima, Bárbara Kellen, Marta Santos, Ana Marques, Michael R. Rose & Margarida Matos
Most founding events entail a reduction of population size, which in turn leads to genetic drift effects that can deplete alleles. Besides reducing neutral genetic variability, founder effects can in principle shift additive genetic variance for phenotypes that underlie fitness. This could then lead to different rates of adaptation among populations that have undergone a population size bottleneck as well as an environmental change, even when these populations have a common evolutionary history. Thus theory...

Data from: P53 gene discriminates two ecologically divergent sister species of pine voles

Ana S. Quina, Cristiane Bastos-Silveira, Marcos Miñarro, Jacint Ventura, Rafael Jiménez, Octávio S. Paulo & Maria L. Mathias
Genes with relevant roles in the differentiation of closely-related species are likely to have diverged simultaneously with the species and more accurately reproduce the species tree. The Lusitanian (Microtus lusitanicus) and Mediterranean (M. duodecimcostatus) pine voles are two recently separated sister species with fossorial lifestyles whose different ecological, physiological and morphological phenotypes reflect the better adaptation of M. duodecimcostatus to the underground habitat. Here we asked whether the differentiation of M. lusitanicus and M. duodecimcostatus...

Data from: Demographic history of a recent invasion of house mice on the isolated Island of Gough

Melissa M. Gray, Daniel Wegmann, Ryan J. Haasl, Michael A. White, Sofia I. Gabriel, Jeremy B. Searle, Richard J. Cuthbert, Peter G. Ryan & Bret A. Payseur
Island populations provide natural laboratories for studying key contributors to evolutionary change, including natural selection, population size, and the colonization of new environments. The demographic histories of island populations can be reconstructed from patterns of genetic diversity. House mice (Mus musculus) inhabit islands throughout the globe, making them an attractive system for studying island colonization from a genetic perspective. Gough Island, in the central South Atlantic Ocean, is one of the remotest islands in the...

Data from: How much can history constrain adaptive evolution? A real time evolutionary approach of inversion polymorphisms in Drosophila subobscura

Inês Fragata, Miguel Lopes-Cunha, Margarida Bárbaro, Bárbara Kellen, Margarida Lima, Marta A. Santos, Gonçalo S. Faria, Mauro Santos, Margarida Matos & Pedro Simões
Chromosomal inversions are present in a wide range of animals and plants, having an important role in adaptation and speciation. Although empirical evidence of their adaptive value is abundant, the role of different processes underlying evolution of chromosomal polymorphisms is not fully understood. History and selection are likely to shape inversion polymorphism variation to an extent yet largely unknown. Here, we perform a real-time evolution study addressing the role of historical constraints and selection in...

Preserving wintering frugivorous birds in agro‐ecosystems under land use change: Lessons from intensive and super-intensive olive orchards

Rui Morgado, Rui Pedroso, Miguel Porto, José Herrera, Francisco Rego, Francisco Moreira & Pedro Beja
Fleshy-fruit production is becoming more intensive worldwide, but how this affects frugivorous birds is poorly known. In the Mediterranean region, intensive and super-intensive olive orchards are fast expanding, potentially affecting millions of wintering songbirds. Here we test the idea that intensification may benefit frugivorous birds, at least locally, due to increased fruit availability, while negatively affecting the wider wintering bird community due to intensive management, structural simplification and landscape homogenisation. We estimated olive abundance and...

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