6 Works

Data from: Organic matter and nutrient inputs from large wildlife influence ecosystem function in the Mara River, Africa

Amanda L. Subalusky, Christopher L. Dutton, Laban Njoroge, Emma J. Rosi & David M. Post
Animals can be important vectors for the movement of resources across ecosystem boundaries. Animals add resources to ecosystems primarily through egestion, excretion and carcasses, and the stoichiometry and bioavailability of these inputs likely interacts with characteristics of the recipient ecosystem to determine their effects on ecosystem function. We studied the influence of hippopotamus excretion/egestion and wildebeest carcasses, and their interactions with discharge, in the Mara River, Kenya. We measured nutrient dissolution and decomposition rates of...

Data from: Variation in coexisting birds to exploit spatial heterogeneity in small mammal activity

Quinn C. Emmering, Janice K. Kelly, Richard S. Ostfeld & Kenneth A. Schmidt
Breeding nest site selection is often the first defense against nest predation risk. To be effective, this mechanism requires site-specific spatial heterogeneity in predator abundance which produces predator-poor space, prey's ability to assess spatial heterogeneity in risk, and few or weak constraints on the ability to settle in within predator-poor space. We used a 15-year dataset on forested grids that provided extensive records of fledging success of veeries (Catharus fuscescens) and ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) in...

Data from: The influence of a semi-arid sub-catchment on suspended sediments in the Mara River, Kenya

Christopher L. Dutton, Amanda L. Subalusky, Shimon C. Anisfeld, Laban Njoroge, Emma J. Rosi & David M. Post
The Mara River Basin in East Africa is a trans-boundary basin of international significance experiencing excessive levels of sediment loads. Sediment levels in this river are extremely high (turbidities as high as 6,000 NTU) and appear to be increasing over time. Large wildlife populations, unregulated livestock grazing, and agricultural land conversion are all potential factors increasing sediment loads in the semi-arid portion of the basin. The basin is well-known for its annual wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus)...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Organic matter loading by hippopotami causes subsidy overload resulting in downstream hypoxia and fish kills

Christopher L. Dutton, Amanda L. Subalusky, Stephen K. Hamilton, Emma J. Rosi & David M. Post
Organic matter and nutrient loading into aquatic ecosystems affects ecosystem structure and function and can result in eutrophication and hypoxia. Hypoxia is usually attributed to anthropogenic pollution and is rarely documented in unpolluted systems, particularly in rivers. Here we show that organic matter loading from hippopotami causes the repeated occurrence of hypoxia in the Mara River, East Africa. We documented 49 high flow events over three years that caused dissolved oxygen decreases, including 13 events...

Data from: Tick-borne disease risk in a forest food web

Richard S. Ostfeld, Taal Levi, Felicia Keesing, Kelly Oggenfuss & Charles D. Canham
Changes to the community ecology of hosts for zoonotic pathogens, particularly rodents, are likely to influence the emergence and prevalence of zoonotic diseases worldwide. However, the complex interactions between abiotic factors, pathogens, vectors, hosts, and both food resources and predators of hosts are difficult to disentangle. Here we (1) use 19 years of data from six large field plots in southeastern New York to compare the effects of hypothesized drivers of interannual variation in Lyme...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
    6
  • Yale University
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    1