53 Works

Data from: Environmental variation partitioned into separate heritable components

Michael Ørsted, Palle Duun Rohde, Ary Anthony Hoffmann, Peter Sørensen & Torsten Nygaard Kristensen
Trait variation is normally separated into genetic and environmental components, yet genetic factors also control the expression of environmental variation, encompassing plasticity across environmental gradients and within-environment responses. We defined four components of environmental variation: plasticity across environments, variability in plasticity, variation within environments, and differences in within-environment variation across environments. We assessed these components for cold tolerance across five rearing temperatures using the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). The four components were found...

Data from: Mapping and analysis of the connectome of sympathetic premotor neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat using a volumetric brain atlas

Bowen Dempsey, Sheng Le, Anita Turner, Phill Bokiniec, Radhika Ramadas, Jan G. Bjaalie, Clement Menuet, Rachael Neve, Andrew Allen, Ann Goodchild, Simon McMullan, Phil Bokiniec, Ann K. Goodchild & Andrew M. Allen
Spinally projecting neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a critical role in the generation of vasomotor sympathetic tone and are thought to receive convergent input from neurons at every level of the neuraxis; the factors that determine their ongoing activity remain unresolved. In this study we use a genetically restricted viral tracing strategy to definitively map their spatially diffuse connectome. We infected bulbospinal RVLM neurons with recombinant rabies variant that drives reporter expression...

Data from: Does increased heat resistance result in higher susceptibility to predation? A test using (Drosophila melanogaster) selection and hardening

Sandra Hangartner, Ian Dworkin, Michael DeNieu & Ary A. Hoffmann
Heat resistance of ectotherms can be increased both by plasticity and evolution, but these effects may have trade-offs resulting from biotic interactions. Here we test for predation costs in Drosophila melanogaster populations with altered heat resistance produced by adult hardening and directional selection for increased heat resistance. In addition, we also tested for genetic trade-offs by testing heat resistance in lines that have evolved under increased predation risk. We show that while 35/37°C hardening increases...

Data from: Interactions between rainfall, fire and herbivory drive resprouter vital rates in a semi-arid ecosystem

Katherine M. Giljohann, Michael A. McCarthy, David A. Keith, Luke T. Kelly, Mark G. Tozer & Tracey J. Regan
1. Global change is threatening ecosystems and biodiversity worldwide, creating a pressing need to understand how climate and disturbance regimes interact and influence the persistence of species. We quantify how three ecosystem drivers– rainfall, fire and herbivory – influence vital rates in the perennial resprouting graminoid, Triodia scariosa, a foundation species of semi-arid Australia. 2. We used an 11 year data set from a fire and herbivore exclosure experiment, to model flowering, post-fire recruitment and...

Data from: Low genetic diversity but strong population structure reflects multiple introductions of western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) into China followed by human-mediated spread

Li-Jun Cao, Ze-Hua Wang, Ya-Jun Gong, Liang Zhu, Ary Anthony Hoffmann & Shu-Jun Wei
Historical invasion scenarios based on observational records are usually incomplete and biased, but these can be supplemented by population genetic data. The western flower thrips (WFT), Frankliniella occidentalis, invaded China in the last 13 years and has rapidly become one of the most serious pests in the country. To assess whether this invasion involved a single event or multiple events, we examined patterns of genetic diversity and population structure of WFT across 12 Chinese populations...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in climate-relevant traits in a tropical rainforest lizard

John Llewelyn, Stewart L. Macdonald, Amberlee Hatcher, Craig Moritz & Ben L. Phillips
Aim The exceptionally rich biodiversity found in tropical rainforest is under threat from anthropogenic climate change. We recognize the threat, yet we have little knowledge of the capacity of tropical species to adjust their climate sensitivity in response to it. One indicator of a species’ capacity to adjust to different climates is the amount of intraspecific variation observed in its climate-relevant traits; if a climate-relevant trait varies, and this variation is correlated with local climates,...

Data from: Evaluating multilocus Bayesian species delimitation for discovery of cryptic mycorrhizal diversity

Michael R. Whitehead, Renee A. Catullo, Monica Ruibal, Kingsley W. Dixon, Rod Peakall & Celeste C. Linde
The increasing availability of DNA sequence data enables exciting new opportunities for fungal ecology. However, it amplifies the challenge of how to objectively classify the diversity of fungal sequences into meaningful units, often in the absence of morphological characters. Here, we test the utility of modern multilocus Bayesian coalescent-based methods for delimiting cryptic fungal diversity in the orchid mycorrhiza morphospecies Serendipita vermifera. We obtained 147 fungal isolates from Caladenia, a speciose clade of Australian orchids...

Data from: Developmental dynamics of ecomorphological convergence in a transcontinental lizard radiation

Christy A. Hipsley & Johannes Müller
Phenotypic convergence has confounded evolutionary biologists for centuries, explained as adaptations to shared selective pressures, or alternatively, the result of limited developmental pathways. We tested the relative roles of adaptation and constraint in generating convergent cranial morphologies across a large lizard radiation, the Lacertidae, whose members inhabit diverse environments throughout the Old World and display high amounts of homoplasy associated with ecological niche. Using three-dimensional X-ray computed tomography, we quantified cranial shape variation associated with...

Data from: Patterns and drivers of aquatic invertebrate diversity across an arid biome

Jenny Davis, Lien Sim, Ross M. Thompson, Adrian Pinder, Jayne Brim Box, Nick P. Murphy, Fran Sheldon, Alejandra Morán-Ordóñez, Paul Sunnucks & Nicholas P. Murphy
Managing and restoring faunal diversity across large areas requires an understanding of the roles of connectivity and dispersal in driving community patterns. We sought to determine the influence of connectivity, water regime, water source, geographical location, and dispersal traits on patterns of aquatic invertebrate diversity across a continent-wide arid biome. We compiled data on freshwater invertebrate assemblages from sites spanning the breadth of arid Australia. Univariate analyses (analysis of variance and rarefaction) revealed that alpha...

Data from: Why we do not expect dispersal probability density functions based on a single mechanism to fit real seed shadows

Roger D. Cousens, Barry D. Hughes & Mohsen B. Mesgaran
Bullock et al. (Journal of Ecology 105:6-19, 2017) have suggested that the theory behind the Wald Analytical Long Distance (WALD) model for wind dispersal from a point source needs to be re-examined. This is on the basis that an inverse Gaussian probability density function (pdf) does not provide the best fit to seed shadows around individual source plants known to be dispersed by wind. We present two reasons why we would not necessarily expect any...

Data from: The complex relationship of exposure to new Plasmodium infections and incidence of clinical malaria in Papua New Guinea

Natalie E. Hofmann, Stephan Karl, Rahel Wampfler, Benson Kiniboro, Albina Teliki, Jonah Iga, Andreea Waltmann, Inoni Betuela, Ingrid Felger, Leanne J. Robinson & Ivo Mueller
The molecular force of blood-stage infection (molFOB) is a quantitative surrogate metric for malaria transmission at population level and for exposure at individual level. Relationships between molFOB, parasite prevalence and clinical incidence were assessed in a treatment-to-reinfection cohort, where P.vivax (Pv) hypnozoites were eliminated in half the children by primaquine (PQ). Discounting relapses, children acquired equal numbers of new P. falciparum (Pf) and Pv blood-stage infections/year (Pf-molFOB=0-18, Pv-molFOB=0-23) resulting in comparable spatial and temporal patterns...

Data from: Enhancing plant diversity in a novel grassland using seed addition

Tara J. Zamin, Alex Jolly, Steve Sinclair, John W. Morgan & Joslin L. Moore
1.Restoration of novel ecosystems to a historical benchmark may not always be possible or advisable. Novel ecosystems may be managed by targeting specific components and accepting the novelty of other ecosystem attributes. The feasibility of this component-wise management of novel ecosystems has rarely been tested. 2.In a novel grassland, where C3 grasses have replaced C4 grasses, nutrients have been elevated, and diversity has been lost due to a history of agricultural land use, we aimed...

Data from: Demographic collapse and low genetic diversity of the Irrawaddy dolphin population inhabiting the Mekong River

Michael Krützen, Isabel Beasley, Corinne Y. Ackermann, Dietmar Lieckfeldt, Arne Ludwig, Gerard E. Ryan, Lars Bejder, Guido J. Parra, Rebekka Wolfensberger & Peter B. S. Spencer
In threatened wildlife populations, it is important to determine whether observed low genetic diversity may be due to recent anthropogenic pressure or the consequence of historic events. Historical size of the Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) population inhabiting the Mekong River is unknown and there is significant concern for long-term survival of the remaining population as a result of low abundance, slow reproduction rate, high neonatal mortality, and continuing anthropogenic threats. We investigated population structure and...

Data from: Ecological opportunity and ecomorphological convergence in Australasian robins (Petroicidae)

Vicente García-Navas, Marta Rodriguez-Rey & Les Christidis
Ecological theories of adaptive radiation predict that ecological opportunity (EO) stimulates cladogenesis through entry into a novel environment and/or release of competition pressures. Due to its dynamic paleoclimatic and geological history, the Australo-Papuan region constitutes an opportune scenario to study patterns of diversification in relation to the colonization of new ecological niches. Here, we employ a comparative framework using the Australasian robins (Petroicidae) as a model system to test whether the diversification of this bird...

Data from: Survey design for precise fire management conservation targets

Holly Sitters, Julian Di Stefano, Timothy Wills, Matthew Swan & Alan York
Common goals of ecological fire management are to sustain biodiversity and minimize extinction risk. A novel approach to achieving these goals determines the relative proportions of vegetation growth stages (equivalent to successional stages, which are categorical representations of time since fire) that maximize a biodiversity index. The method combines data describing species abundances in each growth stage with numerical optimization to define an optimal growth-stage structure which provides a conservation-based operational target for managers. However,...

Data from: Assessing the sensitivity of biodiversity indices used to inform fire management

Katherine M. Giljohann, Luke T. Kelly, Jemima Connell, Michael F. Clarke, Rohan H. Clarke, Tracey J. Regan & Michael A. McCarthy
Biodiversity indices are widely used to summarise changes in the distribution and abundance of multiple species and measure progress towards management targets. However, the sensitivity of biodiversity indices to the data, landscape classification and conservation values underpinning them are rarely interrogated. There are limited studies to help scientists and land managers use biodiversity indices in the presence of fire and vegetation succession. The geometric mean of species’ relative abundance or occurrence (G) is a biodiversity...

Mammal detection data for the SAFE project site, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 2015 [HMTF]

N.J. Deere, G. Guillera-Arroita, E.L. Baking, H. Bernard, M. Pfeifer, G. Reynolds, O.R. Wearn, Z.G. Davies & M.J. Struebig
This data set contains stacked detection matrices for 28 recorded mammal species across 115 sampling locations at the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project site located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Information for each camera trap sampling location, including spatial information and sampling effort is included. Data were collected in order to determine the contribution of carbon-based policies to biodiversity conservation in agricultural land-use mosaics. These data are essential to the development of the occupancy...

Data from: Are trait-growth models transferable? Predicting multi-species growth trajectories between ecosystems using plant functional traits

Freya M. Thomas & Peter A. Vesk
Plant functional traits are increasingly used to generalize across species, however few examples exist of predictions from trait-based models being evaluated in new species or new places. Can we use functional traits to predict growth of unknown species in different areas? We used three independently collected datasets, each containing data on heights of individuals from non-resprouting species over a chronosquence of time-since-fire sites from three ecosystems in south-eastern Australia. We examined the influence of specific...

Data from: Effects of beneficial mutations in pykF gene vary over time and across replicate populations in a long-term experiment with bacteria

Fen Peng, Scott Widmann, Andrea Wunsche, Kristina Duan, Katherine A Donovan, Renwick C. J. Dobson, Richard E. Lenski & Tim F. Cooper
The fitness effects of mutations can depend on the genetic backgrounds in which they occur and thereby influence future opportunities for evolving populations. In particular, mutations that fix in a population might change the selective benefit of subsequent mutations, giving rise to historical contingency. We examine these effects by focusing on mutations in a key metabolic gene, pykF, that arose independently early in the history of 12 Escherichia coli populations during a long-term evolution experiment....

Data from: Distinct microbial communities in the active and permafrost layers on the Tibetan Plateau

Yongliang Chen, Ye Deng, Jinzhi Ding, Hangwei Hu, Tianle Xu, Fei Li, Guibiao Yang, Yuanhe Yang, Hang-Wei Hu, Gui-Biao Yang, Yuan-He Yang & Tian-Le Xu
Permafrost represents an important understudied genetic resource. Soil microorganisms play important roles in regulating biogeochemical cycles and maintaining ecosystem function. However, our knowledge of patterns and drivers of permafrost microbial communities is limited over broad geographic scales. Using high-throughput Illumina sequencing, this study compared soil bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities between the active and permafrost layers on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results indicated that microbial alpha diversity was significantly higher in the active layer than...

Data from: High monetary reward rates and caloric rewards decrease temporal persistence

Bowen J. Fung, Stefan Bode & Carsten Murawski
Temporal persistence refers to an individual's capacity to wait for future rewards, while forgoing possible alternatives. This requires a trade-off between the potential value of delayed rewards and opportunity costs, and is relevant to many real-world decisions, such as dieting. Theoretical models have previously suggested that high monetary reward rates, or positive energy balance, may result in decreased temporal persistence. In our study, 50 fasted participants engaged in a temporal persistence task, incentivised with monetary...

Data from: Can collective memories shape fish distributions? A test, linking space-time occurrence models and population demographics

Jed I. Macdonald, Kai Logemann, Elias T. Krainski, Þorsteinn Sigurðsson, Colin M. Beale, Geir Huse, Solfrid S. Hjøllo & Guðrún Marteinsdóttir
Social learning can be fundamental to cohesive group living, and schooling fishes have proven ideal test subjects for recent work in this field. For many species, both demographic factors, and inter- (and intra-) generational information exchange are considered vital ingredients in how movement decisions are reached. Yet key information is often missing on the spatial outcomes of such decisions, and questions concerning how migratory traditions are influenced by collective memory, density-dependent and density-independent processes remain...

Data from: Testing the niche breadth-range size hypothesis: habitat specialization versus performance in Australian alpine daisies

Megan J. Hirst, Philippa C. Griffin, Jason P. Sexton & Ary A. Hoffmann
Relatively common species within a clade are expected to perform well across a wider range of conditions than their rarer relatives, yet experimental tests of this “niche breadth—range size” hypothesis remain surprisingly scarce. Rarity may arise due to trade-offs between specialization and performance across a wide range of environments. Here we use common garden and reciprocal transplant experiments to test the niche breadth—range size hypothesis, focusing on four common and three rare endemic alpine daisies...

Data from: A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny

, Anne Bruneau, Nasim Azani, Marielle Babineau, Edeline Gagnon, Carole Sinou, Royce Steeves, Erin Zimmerman, C. Donovan Bailey, Lynsey Kovar, Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao, Hannah Banks, RuthP. Clark, Manuel De La Estrella, Peter Gasson, GeoffreyC. Kite, BenteB. Klitgaard, GwilymP. Lewis, Danilo Neves, Gerhard Prenner, María De Lourdes Rico-Arce, ArianeR. Barbosa, Maria Cristina López-Roberts, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, PétalaG. Ribeiro … & Tingshuang Yi
The classification of the legume family proposed here addresses the long-known non-monophyly of the traditionally recognised subfamily Caesalpinioideae, by recognising six robustly supported monophyletic subfamilies. This new classification uses as its framework the most comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of legumes to date, based on plastid matK gene sequences, and including near-complete sampling of genera (698 of the currently recognised 765 genera) and ca. 20% (3696) of known species. The matK gene region has been the most...

Data from: A spatially integrated framework for assessing socioecological drivers of carnivore decline

Nicolás Gálvez, Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita, Freya A. V. St. John, Elke Schüttler, David W. Macdonald & Zoe G. Davies
Habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation are key threats to the long-term persistence of carnivores, which are also susceptible to direct persecution by people. Integrating natural and social science methods to examine how habitat configuration/quality and human–predator relations may interact in space and time to effect carnivore populations within human-dominated landscapes will help prioritise conservation investment and action effectively. We propose a socioecological modelling framework to evaluate drivers of carnivore decline in landscapes where predators and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    53

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    53

Affiliations

  • University of Melbourne
    53
  • Australian National University
    7
  • Monash University
    6
  • UNSW Sydney
    6
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    5
  • La Trobe University
    5
  • University of Kent
    3
  • Macquarie University
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3