12 Works

Data from: Glacial history of the European marine mussels Mytilus, inferred from distribution of mitochondrial DNA lineages

Artur Burzyński, Beata Śmietanka, Roman Wenne & Herman Hummel
Mussels of the genus Mytilus have been used to assess the circumglacial phylogeography of the intertidal zone. These mussels are representative components of the intertidal zone and have rapidly evolving mitochondrial DNA, suitable for high resolution phylogeographic analyses. In Europe, the three Mytilus species currently share mitochondrial haplotypes, owing to the cases of extensive genetic introgression. Genetic diversity of Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus and Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied using a 900-bp long part of the...

Data from: Transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

Jacintha G. B. Van Dijk, A. Christa Mateman & Marcel Klaassen
Maternal antibodies protect chicks from infection with pathogens early in life and may impact pathogen dynamics due to the alteration of the proportion of susceptible individuals in a population. We investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus (AIV) in a key AIV host species, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Combining observations in both the field and in mallards kept in captivity, we connected maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs to (i) female body...

Data from: Adaptive plasticity and epigenetic variation in response to warming in an Alpine plant

Adrienne B. Nicotra, Deborah L. Segal, Gemma L. Hoyle, Aaron W. Schrey, Koen J. F. Verhoeven & Christina L. Richards
Environmentally induced phenotypic plasticity may be a critical component of response to changing environments. We examined local differentiation and adaptive phenotypic plasticity in response to elevated temperature in half-sib lines collected across an elevation gradient for the alpine herb, Wahlenbergia ceracea. Using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), we found low but significant genetic differentiation between low- and high-elevation seedlings, and seedlings originating from low elevations grew faster and showed stronger temperature responses (more plasticity) than...

Data from: Bird-mediated seed dispersal: reduced digestive efficiency in active birds modulates the dispersal capacity of plant seeds

Erik Kleyheeg, Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen, Mary A. Morison, Bart A. Nolet & Merel B. Soons
Plant populations in fragmented ecosystems rely largely on internal dispersal by animals. To unravel the mechanisms underlying this mode of dispersal, an increasing number of experimental feeding studies is carried out. However, while physical activity is known to affect vertebrate digestive processes, almost all current knowledge on mechanisms of internal seed dispersal has been obtained from experiments with resting animals. We investigated how physical activity of the mallard Anas platyrhynchos, probably the quantitatively most important...

Data from: Climatic conditions cause complex patterns of covariation between demographic traits in a long-lived raptor

Ivar Herfindal, Martijn Van De Pol, Jan T. Nielsen, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Anders P. Møller & Bernt-Erik Saether
1. Environmental variation can induce life-history changes that can last over a large part of the lifetime of an organism. If multiple demographic traits are affected, expected changes in climate may influence environmental covariances among traits in a complex manner. Thus, examining the consequences of environmental fluctuations requires that individual information at multiple life stages is available, which is particularly challenging in long-lived species. 2. Here, we analyse how variation in climatic conditions occurring in...

Data from: Range expansion in asexual dandelions: selection for general-purpose genotypes?

Carla Oplaat & Koen J. F. Verhoeven
Phenotypic plasticity and broad ecological tolerance are hypothesized as important traits in the range expansion of asexual species, because individual asexual lineages have to face spatial and temporal environmental variation with limited opportunity for genetic adaptation. The hypothesis that asexual lineages are general-purpose genotypes (GPG) has been previously tested, with mixed results, in species that have both sexual and asexual variants. Such comparisons can be confounded with intra-specific ploidy level differences that are often observed...

Data from: Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi–isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach

Thor Veen, Mårten B. Hjernquist, Steven L. Van Wilgenburg, Keith A. Hobson, Eelke Folmer, Laura Font & Marcel Klaassen
Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival,...

Data from: Weak phylogenetic signal in physiological traits of methane-oxidizing bacteria

Sascha Krause, Peter M. Van Bodegom, Will K. Cornwell & Paul L. E. Bodelier
The presence of phylogenetic signal is assumed to be ubiquitous. However, for microorganisms, this may not be true given that they display high physiological flexibility and have fast regeneration. This may result in fundamentally different patterns of resemblance, that is, in variable strength of phylogenetic signal. However, in microbiological inferences, trait similarities and therewith microbial interactions with its environment are mostly assumed to follow evolutionary relatedness. Here, we tested whether indeed a straightforward relationship between...

Data from: Herbivores enforce sharp boundaries between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems

Judith M. Sarneel, Naomi Huig, Geertje F. Veen, Winnie Rip & Elisabeth S. Bakker
The transitions between ecosystems (ecotones) are often biodiversity hotspots, but we know little about the forces that shape them. Today, often sharp boundaries with low diversity are found between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This has been attributed to environmental factors that hamper succession. However, ecosystem properties are often controlled by both bottom-up and top-down forces, but their relative importance in shaping riparian boundaries is not known. We hypothesize that (1) herbivores may enforce sharp transitions...

Data from: Windows of opportunity for germination of riparian species after restoring water level fluctuations: a field experiment with controlled seed banks

Judith M. Sarneel, Roel H. Janssen, Winnie J. Rip, Irene M. A. Bender & Elisabeth S. Bakker
1. Restoration activities aiming at increasing vegetation diversity often try to stimulate both dispersal and germination. In wetlands, dispersal and germination are coupled as water and water level fluctuations (WLF) simultaneously influence seed transport and germination conditions (soil moisture). Water regime shifts have been shown to affect vegetation composition. However, the interactions between WLF, dispersal and subsequent germination as drivers of such changes are still poorly understood, especially within the complexity of a field situation....

Data from: Disentangling plastic and genetic changes in body mass of Siberian jays

Phillip Gienapp & Juha Merilä
Spatial and temporal phenotypic differentiation in mean body size is of commonplace occurrence, but the underlying causes remain often unclear: both genetic differentiation in response to selection (or drift) and environmentally induced plasticity can create similar phenotypic patterns. Studying changes in body mass in Siberian jays (Perisoreus infaustus) over three decades, we discovered that mean body mass declined drastically (ca. 10%) over the first two decades, but increased markedly thereafter back to almost the initial...

Data from: Hydrology, shore morphology and species traits affect seed dispersal, germination and community assembly in shoreline plant communities

Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen, Judith M. Sarneel, José Van Paassen, Winnie J. Rip & Elisabeth S. Bakker
1.Seed dispersal and germination are two primary processes influencing plant community assembly. On freshwater shores, water levels regulate both processes. However, it is still unclear how water levels, shore morphology and species traits interactively affect seed dispersal and germination, and how these interactions determine plant community assembly. We hypothesize that a drawdown water regime enhances seed establishment compared to a year-round stable water level, that this increases species richness and diversity, and that this is...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    12
  • Umeå University
    3
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • Deakin University
    2
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • Polish Academy of Sciences
    1
  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
    1