31 Works

Data from: What you need is what you eat? Prey selection by the bat Myotis daubentonii

Eero J. Vesterinen, Lasse Ruokolainen, Niklas Wahlberg, Carlos Peña, Tomas Roslin, Veronika N. Laine, Ville Vasko, Ilari E. Sääksjärvi, Kai Norrdahl & Thomas M. Lilley
Optimal foraging theory predicts that predators are selective when faced with abundant prey, but become less picky when prey gets sparse. Insectivorous bats in temperate regions are faced with the challenge of building up fat reserves vital for hibernation during a period of decreasing arthropod abundances. According to optimal foraging theory, prehibernating bats should adopt a less selective feeding behaviour – yet empirical studies have revealed many apparently generalized species to be composed of specialist...

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Nectar accessibility determines fitness, flower choice and abundance of hoverflies that provide natural pest control

Paul C.J. Van Rijn, Felix L. Wäckers & Paul C. J. Van Rijn
1. In modern agricultural landscapes many organisms providing ecosystem services such as pollination and natural pest control are likely constrained by shortage of nectar and/or pollen required for adult nutrition. More and more flower-rich field margin strips and other habitats are created to eliminate these constraints. For most target organisms, however, it is not well known which (types of) flowers are effective in providing suitable pollen and nectar. 2. We studied the suitability of a...

Data from: Lifespan and reproductive cost explain interspecific variation in the optimal onset of reproduction

Emeline Mourocq, Pierre Bize, Sandra Bouwhuis, Russell Bradley, Anne Charmantier, Carlos De La Cruz, Szymon Marian Obniak, Richard H. M. Espie, Márton Herenyi, Hermann Hötker, Oliver Kruger, John Marzluff, Anders P. Møller, Shinichi Nakagawa, Richard A. Phillips, Andrew N. Radford, Alexandre Roulin, János Török, Juliana Valencia, Martijn Van De Pol, Ian G. Warkentin, Isabel S. Winney, Andrew G. Wood, Michael Griesser & Szymon M. Drobniak
Fitness can be profoundly influenced by the age at first reproduction (AFR), but to date the AFR-fitness relationship only has been investigated intraspecifically. Here we investigated the relationship between AFR and average lifetime reproductive success (LRS) across 34 bird species. We assessed differences in the deviation of the Optimal AFR (i.e., the species-specific AFR associated with the highest LRS) from the age at sexual maturity, considering potential effects of life-history as well as social and...

Data from: Heritable variation in maternally-derived yolk androgens, thyroid hormones and immune factors

Suvi Ruuskanen, Phillip Gienapp, Ton G.G Groothuis, Sonja V. Schaper, Veerle M. Darras, Cheyenne Pereira, Bonnie De Vries & Marcel E. Visser
Maternal reproductive investment can critically influence offspring phenotype, and thus these maternal effects are expected to be under strong natural selection. Knowledge on the extent of heritable variation in the physiological mechanisms underlying maternal effects is however limited. In birds, resource allocation to eggs is a key mechanism for mothers to affect their offspring and different components of the egg may or may not be independently adjusted. We studied the heritability of egg components and...

Data from: Maternal transfer of androgens in eggs is affected by food supplementation but not by predation risk

Chiara Morosinotto, Robert L. Thomson, Suvi Ruuskanen, Erkki Korpimäki, Esa Lehikoinen, Erich Möstl & Toni Laaksonen
Mothers may affect the future success of their offspring by varying allocation to eggs and embryos. Allocation may be adaptive based on the environmental conditions perceived during early breeding. We investigated the effects of food supplementation and predation risk on yolk hormone transfer in the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca. In a food supplementation experiment, females were food-supplemented prior to and during egg-laying and androgen concentrations were measured throughout the laying order. Predation risk was investigated...

Data from: Insect herbivory on native and exotic aquatic plants: phosphorus and nitrogen drive insect growth and nutrient release

Bart M. C. Grutters, Elisabeth M. Gross & Elisabeth S. Bakker
Eutrophication and globalisation facilitate the dominance of exotic plants in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Aquatic omnivores can provide biotic resistance to plant invasions, but little is known about whether obligate aquatic herbivores can do the same. Herbivores such as insects can decimate aquatic vegetation, but may not be able to consume exotic plants due to their more or less specialised nature of feeding. We experimentally tested the larval feeding of an aquatic insect, the moth Parapoynx...

Data from: Eggs brought in from afar: Svalbard-breeding pink-footed geese can fly their eggs across the Barents Sea

Marcel Klaassen, Steffen Hahn, Harry Korthals & Jesper Madsen
Many Arctic-breeding waterbirds are thought to bring nutrients for egg production from southern latitudes to allow early breeding. It has proved problematic to quantify the extent of such capital breeding and identify whether nutrients for egg production are brought in from nearby or from afar. Before reaching their breeding grounds on Svalbard, pink-footed geese Anser brachyrhynchus fly ∼ 1100 km across the Barents Sea from Norway. Using abdominal profile indexing (API) we scored body stores...

Data from: Testing for biases in selection on avian reproductive traits and partitioning direct and indirect selection using quantitative genetic models

Thomas E. Reed, Phillip Gienapp & Marcel E. Visser
Key life history traits such as breeding time and clutch size are frequently both heritable and under directional selection, yet many studies fail to document micro-evolutionary responses. One general explanation is that selection estimates are biased by the omission of correlated traits that have causal effects on fitness, but few valid tests of this exist. Here we show, using a quantitative genetic framework and six decades of life-history data on two free-living populations of great...

Data from: Predicting effects of water regime changes on waterbirds: insights from staging swans

Bart A. Nolet, Abel Gyimesi, Roderick R.D. Van Krimpen, Willem F. De Boer, Richard A. Stillman & Roderick R. D. Van Krimpen
Predicting the environmental impact of a proposed development is notoriously difficult, especially when future conditions fall outside the current range of conditions. Individual-based approaches have been developed and applied to predict the impact of environmental changes on wintering and staging coastal bird populations. How many birds make use of staging sites is mostly determined by food availability and accessibility, which in the case of many waterbirds in turn is affected by water level. Many water...

Data from: Inter-annual variability and long-term trends in breeding success in a declining population of migratory swans

Kevin A. Wood, Julia L. Newth, Geoff M. Hilton, Bart A. Nolet & Eileen C. Rees
Population declines among migratory Arctic-breeding birds are a growing concern for conservationists. To inform the conservation of these declining populations, we need to understand how demographic rates such as breeding success are influenced by combinations of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. In this study we examined inter-annual variation and long-term trends in two aspects of the breeding success of a migratory herbivore, the Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii, which is currently undergoing a population decline: 1)...

Data from: Low abundant soil bacteria can be metabolically versatile and fast growing

Viola Kurm, Wim H. Van Der Putten, Wietse De Boer, Suzanne Naus-Wiezer & W. H. Gera Hol
The abundance of species is assumed to depend on their life history traits, such as growth rate and resource specialization. However, this assumption has not been tested for bacteria. Here we investigate how abundance of soil bacteria relates to slow growth and substrate specialization (oligotrophy) versus fast growth and substrate generalization (copiotrophy). We collected 47 saprotrophic soil bacterial isolates of differing abundances and measured their growth rate and the ability to use a variety of...

Data from: Plant mutualisms with rhizosphere microbiota in introduced versus native ranges

Natasha Shelby, Richard P. Duncan, Wim H. Van Der Putten, Kevin J. McGinn, Carolin Weser & Philip E. Hulme
The performance of introduced plants can be limited by the availability of soil mutualists outside their native range, but how interactions with mutualists differ between ranges is largely unknown. If mutualists are absent, incompatible or parasitic, plants may compensate by investing more in root biomass, adapting to be more selective or by maximizing the benefits associated with the mutualists available. We tested these hypotheses using seven non-agricultural species of Trifolium naturalized in New Zealand (NZ)....

Data from: Context-dependent effects of radio transmitter attachment on a small passerine

Lysanne Snijders, Lydia E. Nieuwe Weme, Piet De Goede, James L. Savage, Kees Van Oers & Marc Naguib
Biotelemetry devices provide unprecedented insights into the spatial behaviour and ecology of many animals. Quantifying the potential effects of attaching such devices to animals is essential, but certain effects may appear only in specific or particularly stressful contexts. Here we analyse the effects of radio transmitter attachment on great tits Parus major tagged over three environmentally dissimilar years, as part of a project studying social- and communication networks. When we radio-tagged birds before breeding, only...

Data from: Root-lesion nematodes suppress cabbage aphid population development by reducing aphid daily reproduction

Wilhelmina H. G. Hol, Ciska E. Raaijmakers, Ilse Mons, Katrin M. Meyer & Nicole M. Van Dam
Empirical studies have shown that belowground feeding herbivores can affect the performance of aboveground herbivores in different ways. Often the critical life-history parameters underlying the observed performance effects remain unexplored. In order to better understand the cause for the observed effects on aboveground herbivores, these ecological mechanisms must be better understood. In this study we combined empirical experiments with a modelling approach to analyse the effect of two root feeding endoparasitic nematodes with different feeding...

Data from: Modeling winter moth Operophtera brumata egg phenology: nonlinear effects of temperature and developmental stage on developmental rate

Lucia Salis, Marjolein Lof, Margriet Van Asch & Marcel E. Visser
Understanding the relationship between an insect's developmental rate and temperature is crucial to forecast insect phenology under climate change. In the winter moth Operophtera brumata timing of egg-hatching has severe fitness consequences on growth and reproduction as egg-hatching has to match bud burst of the host tree. In the winter moth, as in many insect species, egg development is strongly affected by ambient temperatures. Here we use laboratory experiments to show for the first time...

Data from: Plant quantity affects development and survival of a gregarious insect herbivore and its endoparasitoid wasp

Minghui Fei, Rieta Gols, Feng Zhu & Jeffrey A. Harvey
Virtually all studies of plant-herbivore-natural enemy interactions focus on plant quality as the major constraint on development and survival. However, for many gregarious feeding insect herbivores that feed on small or ephemeral plants, the quantity of resources is much more limiting, yet this area has received virtually no attention. Here, in both lab and semi-field experiments using tents containing variably sized clusters of food plants, we studied the effects of periodic food deprivation in a...

Data from: Recent and dynamic transposable elements contribute to genomic divergence under asexuality

Julie Ferreira De Carvalho, Victor De Jager, Thomas P. Van Gurp, Niels C.A.M. Wagemaker & Koen J.F. Verhoeven
Background: Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile pieces of genetic information with high mutagenic potential for the host genome. Transposition is often neutral or deleterious but may also generate potentially adaptive genetic variation. This additional source of variation could be especially relevant in non-recombining species reproducing asexually. However, evidence is lacking to determine the relevance of TEs in plant asexual genome evolution and their associated effects. Here, we characterize the repetitive fraction of the genome of...

Data from: Modification of plant-induced responses by an insect ecosystem engineer influences the colonization behaviour of subsequent shelter-users

Akane Uesugi, Kimberly Morrell, Erik H. Poelman, Ciska E. Raaijmakers & André Kessler
Herbivores that modify plant morphology, such as gall forming insects, can disproportionately impact arthropod community on their host plants by providing novel habitats and shelters from biotic and abiotic stresses. These ecosystem engineers could also modify plant chemical properties, but how such changes in plant quality affect the behaviour of subsequent colonizers has rarely been investigated. We explored how an initial infestation of the tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima) by an ecosystem engineer, the rosette gall-midge...

Data from: After-life effects: living and dead invertebrates differentially affect plants and their associated above- and belowground multitrophic communities

Martine Kos, Jingying Jing, Ivor Keesmaat, Steven A.J. Declerck, Roel Wagenaar, T. Martijn Bezemer & Steven A. J. Declerck
Above-belowground (AG-BG) studies typically focus on plant-mediated effects inflicted by living organisms. However, animal cadavers may also play an important role in AG-BG interactions. Here, we explore whether living and dead foliar-feeding and soil-dwelling invertebrates differentially affect plants and their associated AG and BG multitrophic communities. In a mesocosm study we separated effects of living and dead locusts (AG herbivores) and earthworms (BG detritivores) on experimental multitrophic communities consisting of eight plant species, an AG...

Data from: Aboveground mammal and invertebrate exclusions cause consistent changes in soil food webs of two subalpine grassland types, but mechanisms are system-specific

Martijn L. Vandegehuchte, Wim H. Van Der Putten, Henk Duyts, Martin Schütz & Anita C. Risch
Ungulates, smaller mammals, and invertebrates can each affect soil biota through their influence on vegetation and soil characteristics. However, direct and indirect effects of the aboveground biota on soil food webs remain to be unraveled. We assessed effects of progressively excluding aboveground large-, medium- and small-sized mammals as well as invertebrates on soil nematode diversity and feeding type abundances in two subalpine grassland types: short- and tall-grass vegetation. We explored pathways that link exclusions of...

Data from: The potential of hyperspectral patterns of winter wheat to detect changes in soil microbial community composition

W. H. Gera Hol, Sabrina Carvalho & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Reliable information on soil status and crop health is crucial for detecting and mitigating disasters like pollution or minimizing impact from soil-borne diseases. While infestation with an aggressive soil pathogen can be detected via reflected light spectra, it is unknown to what extent hyperspectral reflectance could be used to detect overall changes in soil biodiversity. We tested the hypotheses that spectra can be used to 1) separate plants growing with microbial communities from different farms;...

Data from: Genetic variation in variability: phenotypic variability of fledging weight and its evolution in a songbird population

Han A. Mulder, Philip Gienapp & Marcel E. Visser
Variation in traits is essential for natural selection to operate and genetic and environmental effects can contribute to this phenotypic variation. From domesticated populations, we know that families can differ in their level of within-family variance, which leads to the intriguing situation that within-family variance can be heritable. For offspring traits, such as birth weight, this implies that within-family variance in traits can vary among families and can thus be shaped by natural selection. Empirical...

Data from: Effects of plant diversity on the concentration of secondary plant metabolites and the density of arthropods on focal plants in the field

Olga Kostenko, Patrick P. J. Mulder, Matthijs Courbois & T. Martijn Bezemer
1. The diversity of the surrounding plant community can directly affect the abundance of insects on a focal plant as well as the size and quality of that focal plant. However, to what extent the effects of plant diversity on the arthropod community on a focal plant are mediated by host plant quality or by the diversity of the surrounding plants remains unresolved. 2. In the field, we sampled arthropod communities on focal Jacobaea vulgaris...

Data from: Effects of multi-generational stress exposure and offspring environment on the expression and persistence of transgenerational effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

Maartje P. Groot, Rik Kooke, Nieke Knoben, Philippine Vergeer, Joost J. B. Keurentjes, N. Joop Ouborg, Koen Verhoeven & Koen J. F. Verhoeven
Plant phenotypes can be affected by environments experienced by their parents. Parental environmental effects are reported for the first offspring generation and some studies showed persisting environmental effects in second and further offspring generations. However, the expression of these transgenerational effects proved context-dependent and their reproducibility can be low. Here we study the context-dependency of transgenerational effects by evaluating parental and transgenerational effects under a range of parental induction and offspring evaluation conditions. We systematically...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    31
  • Wageningen University & Research
    14
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    3
  • University of Turku
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • University of Amsterdam
    2
  • KU Leuven
    2