140 Works

Data from: Invasion facilitates hybridization with introgression in the Rattus rattus species complex

Justin B. Lack, Daniel U. Greene, Chris John Conroy, Meredith J. Hamilton, Janet K. Braun, Michael A. Mares & Ronald A. Van Den Bussche
Biological invasions result in novel species interactions, which can have significant evolutionary impacts on both native and invading taxa. One evolutionary concern with invasions is hybridization among lineages that were previously isolated, but make secondary contact in their invaded range(s). Black rats, consisting of several morphologically very similar but genetically distinct taxa that collectively have invaded six continents, are arguably the most successful mammalian invaders on the planet. We used mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences, two...

Data from: Evolution in extreme environments: replicated phenotypic differentiation in livebearing fish inhabiting sulfidic springs

Michael Tobler, Maura Palacios, Lauren J Chapman, Igor Mitrofanov, David Bierbach, Martin Plath, Lenin Arias-Rodriguez, Francisco J García De León & Mariana Mateos
We investigated replicated ecological speciation in the livebearing fishes Poecilia mexicana and P. sulphuraria (Poeciliidae), which inhabit freshwater habitats and have also colonized multiple sulfidic springs in southern Mexico. These springs exhibit extreme hypoxia and high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, which is lethal to most metazoans. We used phylogenetic analyses to test whether springs were independently colonized, performed phenotypic assessments of body and gill morphology variation to identify convergent patterns of trait differentiation, and conducted...

Data from: Immunoglobulin detection in wild birds: effectiveness of three secondary anti-avian IgY antibodies in direct ELISAs in 41 avian species

Carol A. Fassbinder-Orth, Travis E. Wilcoxen, Tiffany Tran, Raoul K. Boughton, Jeanne M. Fair, Erik K. Hofmeister, Jennifer L. Grindstaff & Jen C. Owen
1.Immunological reagents for wild, non-model species are limited or often non-existent for many species. 2. In this study, we compare the reactivity of a new anti-passerine IgY secondary antibody with existing secondary antibodies developed for use with birds. Samples from 41 species from the following six avian orders were analysed: Anseriformes (1 family, 1 species), Columbiformes (1 family, 2 species), Galliformes (1 family, 1 species), Passeriformes (16 families, 34 species), Piciformes (1 family, 2 species)...

Data from: Influence of drift and admixture on population structure of American black bears (Ursus americanus) in the Central Interior Highlands, U.S.A. 50 years after translocation

Emily E. Puckett, Thea V. Kristensen, Clay M. Wilton, Sara B. Lyda, Karen V. Noyce, Paula M. Holahan, , Jeff Beringer, Jerrold L. Belant, , Lori S. Eggert & David M. Leslie
Bottlenecks, founder events, and genetic drift often result in decreased genetic diversity and increased population differentiation. These events may follow abundance declines due to natural or anthropogenic perturbations, where translocations may be an effective conservation strategy to increase population size. American black bears (Ursus americanus) were nearly extirpated from the Central Interior Highlands, USA by 1920. In an effort to restore bears, 254 individuals were translocated from Minnesota, USA and Manitoba, Canada, into the Ouachita...

Data from: MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

V. Bala Chaudhary, Megan A. Rúa, Anita Antoninka, James D. Bever, Jeffery Cannon, Ashley Craig, Jessica Duchicela, Alicia Frame, Monique Gardes, Catherine Gehring, Michelle Ha, Miranda Hart, Jacob Hopkins, Baoming Ji, Nancy Collins Johnson, Wittaya Kaonongbua, Justine Karst, Roger T. Koide, Louis J. Lamit, James Meadow, Brook G. Milligan, John C. Moore, , Bridget Piculell, Blake Ramsby … & Jason D. Hoeksema
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: Effect of pyric herbivory on source-sink dynamics in grassland birds

Craig A. Davis, Roy T. Churchwell, Samuel D. Fuhlendorf, David M. Engle & Torre J. Hovick
Grasslands world-wide provide a host of ecosystem services. In particular, these grasslands serve as biodiversity repositories for a myriad of imperilled animal species. One such group is grassland birds, which have experienced significant declines, predominantly caused by extensive loss and degradation of native grasslands. Rangeland management that promotes increasing and sustaining livestock production through reducing the inherent, disturbance-driven variability that historically occurred in grasslands is considered a major contributing factor to these declines. An alternative...

Data from: Asymmetric energetic costs in reciprocal-cross hybrids between carnivorous mice (Onychomys)

J. Ryan Shipley, Polly Campbell, Jeremy B. Searle & Bret Pasch
Aerobic respiration is a fundamental physiological trait dependent on coordinated interactions between gene products of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Mitonuclear mismatch in interspecific hybrids may contribute to reproductive isolation by inducing reduced viability (or even complete inviability) due to increased metabolic costs. However, few studies have tested for effects of mitonuclear mismatch on respiration at the whole organism level. We explored how hybridization affects metabolic rates in closely related species of grasshopper mice (genus...

Data from: Mismatch between dietary requirements for lipid by a predator and availability of lipid in prey

Will D. Wiggins & Shawn M. Wilder
Growth is an important factor in predicting an organism's overall success as an adult. Understanding how abiotic and biotic factors influence body size is key to predicting how environmental changes will impact organisms and predicting optimal behaviors under varying conditions. Food items can vary widely in nutrient content and this variation can affect growth. We tested how the quantity and macronutrient content of live prey affected the growth of juvenile jumping spiders, Phiddipus audax, using...

Raw data for: No reproductive benefits of dear enemy recognition in a territorial songbird

Michael Reichert, Jodie Crane, Gabrielle Davidson, Eileen Dillane, Ipek Kulahci, James O'Neill, Kees Van Oers, Ciara Sexton & John Quinn
Territorial animals often learn to distinguish their neighbors from unfamiliar conspecifics. This cognitive ability facilitates the dear enemy effect, where individuals respond less aggressively to neighbors than to other individuals, and is hypothesized to be adaptive by reducing unnecessary aggressive interactions with individuals that are not a threat to territory ownership. A key prediction of this hypothesis, that individuals with better ability to learn to recognize neighbors should have higher fitness, has never been tested....

Sex-specific speed-accuracy tradeoffs shape neural processing of acoustic signals in a grasshopper

Jan Clemens, Bernhard Ronacher & Michael Reichert
Speed-accuracy tradeoffs – being fast at the risk of being wrong – are fundamental to many decisions and natural selection is expected to resolve these tradeoffs according to the costs and benefits of behavior. We here test the prediction that females and males should integrate information from courtship signals differently because they experience different payoffs along the speed-accuracy continuum. We fitted a neural model of decision making (a drift-diffusion model of integration to threshold) to...

Mucilage-binding to ground protects seeds of many plants from harvester ants: a functional investigation

Vincent Pan, Marshall McMunn, Richard Karban, Jake Goidell, Eric LoPresti & Marjorie Weber
The seeds of many plant species produce mucilage on their surfaces that when wetted and dried, firmly adheres seeds to surfaces and substrates. Previous studies have demonstrated that seed anchorage to the ground can reduce seed predation, though only a few species have thus far been tested. Here we investigated whether binding to the ground reduces seed removal by harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex subdentatus), an important granivore, for 53 species with mucilaginous seeds. We also explored...

Data from: A generalist bird exhibits site-dependent resource selection

Samantha M. Cady, Craig A. Davis, Dwayne R. Elmore, Samuel D. Fuhlendorf, Cameron Duquette, Evan P. Tanner & Matthew J. Carroll
Quantifying resource selection (an organism’s disproportionate use of available resources) is essential to infer habitat requirements of a species, develop management recommendations, predict species responses to changing conditions, and improve our understanding of the processes that underlie ecological patterns. Because study sites, even within the same region, can differ in both the amount and the arrangement of cover types, our objective was to determine whether proximal sites can yield markedly different resource selection results for...

Data for: PickMe: sample selection for species tree reconstruction using coalescent weighted quartets

Joseph Rusinko, Yu Cai, Allison Doherty, Katherine Thompson, Julien Boutte, Mark Fishbein & Shannon Straub
After collecting large data sets of many genes for many species for phylogenomics studies, researchers may make ad hoc decisions about which genes or samples to include in a species tree reconstruction analysis based on various parameters, including the amount of missing data. Optimally, sampling would be maximized, but it can be difficult for empiricists to determine where to draw the line for sample inclusion when data sets are incomplete. Under the multispecies coalescent model,...

Additional file 1 of Realized niche shift of an invasive widow spider: drivers and impacts of human activities

Zhenhua Luo, Monica A. Mowery, Xinlan Cheng, Qing Yang, Junhua Hu & Maydianne C. B. Andrade
Additional file 1. Table S1: Occurrence records of Latrodectus hasselti included in this study.

Additional file 20 of Gut microbiota is associated with the effect of photoperiod on seasonal breeding in male Brandt’s voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii)

Hanyi Zhu, Guoliang Li, Jing Liu, Xiaoming Xu & Zhibin Zhang
Additional file 20. Photoperiod experiment and FMT experiment_data.

Additional file 21 of Gut microbiota is associated with the effect of photoperiod on seasonal breeding in male Brandt’s voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii)

Hanyi Zhu, Guoliang Li, Jing Liu, Xiaoming Xu & Zhibin Zhang
Additional file 21. Rcode.R.

Data for: Sigma-B responses of Bacillus subtilis exposed to different environmental stressors and containing different single RsbR proteins or hybrid fusions of RsbRs

Matthew Cabeen
Bacteria use a variety of systems to sense stress and mount an appropriate response to assure fitness and survival. Bacillus subtilis uses stressosomes—cytoplasmic multiprotein complexes—to sense environmental stressors and enact the general stress response by activating the alternative sigma factor σB. Each stressosome includes 40 RsbR proteins, representing four paralogous (RsbRA, RsbRB, RsbRC, and RsbRD) putative stress sensors. Population-level analyses suggested that the RsbR paralogs are largely redundant, while our prior work using microfluidics-coupled fluorescence...

Phenotype data for: Pleiotropic and non-redundant effects of an auxin importer in Setaria and maize

Chuanmei Zhu, Mathew Box, Dhineshkumar Thiruppathi, Hao Hu, Yunqing Yu, Callista Martin, Andrew Doust, Paula McSteen & Elizabeth Kellogg
Directional transport of auxin is critical for inflorescence and floral development in flowering plants, but the role of auxin influx carriers (AUX1 proteins) has been largely overlooked. Taking advantage of available AUX1 mutants in Setaria viridis and maize, we uncover previously unreported aspects of plant development that are affected by auxin influx, including higher order branches in the inflorescence, stigma branch number, and glume (floral bract) development, and plant fertility. However, disruption of auxin flux...

Sandy seeds: Armor or invisibility cloak? Mucilage-bound sand physically protects seeds from rodents and invertebrates

Eric LoPresti, Vincent Pan, Cecilia Girvin, Gabhriel Barber, Sierra Jaeger & John Orrock
Seeds represent a stage of a plant’s life cycle that is extremely vulnerable to predation, which, unlike most vegetative herbivory, is fatal to the individual. As such, understanding the distribution and abundance of plants may rely upon understanding seed defenses: characteristics of seeds that make them more difficult for granivores to locate, make them less beneficial for granivores to consume, or both. Seeds that produce mucilage are widespread and found across many families and species....

Data from: Are thyroid hormones mediators of incubation temperature-induced phenotypes in birds?

Sarah E. DuRant, Amanda W. Carter, Robert J. Denver, Gary R. Hepp & William A. Hopkins
Incubation temperature influences a suite of traits in avian offspring. However, the mechanisms underlying expression of these phenotypes are unknown. Given the importance of thyroid hormones in orchestrating developmental processes, we hypothesized that they may act as an upstream mechanism mediating the effects of temperature on hatchling phenotypic traits such as reduced growth and thermoregulation. We found that plasma T3, but not T4 concentrations, differed among newly-hatched wood ducks (Aix sponsa) from different embryonic incubation...

Data from: Experimentally decoupling reproductive investment from energy storage to test the functional basis of a life-history tradeoff

Robert M. Cox, Matthew B. Lovern & Ryan Calsbeek
The ubiquitous life-history trade-off between reproduction and survival has long been hypothesized to reflect underlying energy-allocation trade-offs between reproductive investment and processes related to self-maintenance. Although recent work has questioned whether energy-allocation models provide sufficient explanations for the survival cost of reproduction, direct tests of this hypothesis are rare, especially in wild populations. This hypothesis was tested in a wild population of brown anole lizards (Anolis sagrei) using a two-step experiment. First, stepwise variation in...

Data from: The rediscovery of a long described species reveals additional complexity in speciation patterns of poeciliid fishes in sulfide springs

Maura Palacios, Lenin Arias-Rodrigues, Martin Plath, Constanze Eifert, Hannes Lerp, Anton Lamboj, Gary Voelker, Michael Tobler & Lenin Arias-Rodriguez
The process of ecological speciation drives the evolution of locally adapted and reproductively isolated populations in response to divergent natural selection. In Southern Mexico, several lineages of the freshwater fish species of the genus Poecilia have independently colonized toxic, hydrogen sulfide-rich springs. Even though ecological speciation processes are increasingly well understood in this system, aligning the taxonomy of these fish with evolutionary processes has lagged behind. While some sulfide spring populations are classified as ecotypes...

Data from: Shaped by the past, acting in the present: transgenerational plasticity of anti-predatory traits

Lynne E. Beaty, Jillian D. Wormington, Bart J. Kensinger, Kristen N. Bayley, Scott R. Goeppner, Kyle D. Gustafson & Barney Luttbeg
Phenotypic expression can be altered by direct perception of environmental cues (within-generation phenotypic plasticity) and by the environmental cues experienced by previous generations (transgenerational plasticity). Few studies, however, have investigated how the characteristics of phenotypic traits affect their propensity to exhibit plasticity within and across generations. We tested whether plasticity differed within and across generations between morphological and behavioral anti-predator traits of Physa acuta, a freshwater snail. We reared 18 maternal lineages of P. acuta...

Data from: Ontogenetic development of otoliths in alligator gar

James M. Long & Richard A. Snow
Alligator Gar Atractosteus spatula is a species of conservation concern throughout its range and an examination of otoliths during early development would aid understanding its life history and ecology. We conducted X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and light microscopy to examine the three pairs of otoliths and how they developed over time in relation to fish size and age. The sagittae are the largest, with distinct dorsal and ventral lobes, and...

Data from: Resource levels and prey state influence antipredator behavior and the strength of nonconsumptive predator effects

Catherine M. Matassa, Sarah C. Donelan, Barney Luttbeg & Geoffrey C. Trussell
The risk of predation can drive trophic cascades by causing prey to engage in antipredator behavior (e.g. reduced feeding), but these behaviors can be energetically costly for prey. The effects of predation risk on prey (nonconsumptive effects, NCEs) and emergent indirect effects on basal resources should therefore depend on the ecological context (e.g. resource abundance, prey state) in which prey manage growth/predation risk tradeoffs. Despite an abundance of behavioral research and theory examining state-dependent responses...

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