6 Works

Exploration speed in captivity predicts foraging tactics and diet in free-living red knots

Selin Ersoy, Christine Beardsworth, Anne Dekinga, Marcel Van Der Meer, Theunis Piersma, Ton Groothuis & Allert Bijleveld
Variation in foraging tactics and diet are usually attributed to differences in morphology, experience, and prey availability. Recently, consistent individual differences in behaviour (personality) have been shown to be associated with foraging strategies. Bolder or more exploratory individuals are predicted to have a faster pace-of-life and offset the costs of moving more or in risky areas, with higher energetic gains by encountering profitable foraging opportunities and prey. However, the relationship between personality, foraging, and diet...

2D and 3D coral models imaged in Curaçao: George, Mullinix, et al PeerJ 2021

Emma E. George, James A. Mullinix, Fanwei Meng, Barbara A. Bailey, Clinton Edwards, Ben Felts, Andreas F. Haas, Aaron Hartmann, Benjamin Mueller, Ty F. Roach, Peter Salamon, Cynthia Silveira, Mark Vermeij, Forest Rohwer & Antoni Luque
Abstract from the article associated with the dataset: George, Mullinix, et al PeerJ 2021. Reef-building corals are ecosystem engineers that compete with other benthic or- ganisms for space and resources. Corals harvest energy through their surface by photosynthesis and heterotrophic feeding, and they divert part of this energy to defend their outer colony perimeter against competitors. Here, we hypothesized that corals with a larger space-filling surface and smaller perimeters increase energy gain while reducing the...

A systematic review of long-term avian studies on phenological changes of birds and their food

Mikhail Zhemchuzhnikov & Tom Versluijs
Many organisms reproduce in seasonal environments, where selection on timing of reproduction is particularly strong as consumers need to synchronize reproduction with the peaked occurrence of their food. When a consumer species changes its phenology at a slower rate than its resources, this may induce a trophic mismatch, i.e. offspring growing up after the peak in food availability, potentially leading to reductions in growth and survival. However, there is large variation in the degree of...

Data from: Reciprocal facilitation between annual plants and burrowing crabs: implications for the restoration of degraded salt marshes

Dongdong Qiu, Baoshan Cui, Xu Ma, Jiaguo Yan, Yanzi Cai, Tian Xie, Fang Gao, Fangfang Wang, Haochen Sui, Junhong Bai, Johan Van De Koppel & Han Olff
​​​​​​Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interactions between species play an essential role in coastal wetland ecosystems. However, there is a lack of understanding of how such interactions can be used for restoration purposes in salt marsh ecosystems. We, therefore, studied the mechanisms of reciprocal facilitative interactions between native annual plants, Suaeda salsa, and burrowing crabs, Helice tientsinensis, in a middle-elevation salt marsh (with generally high plant density and moderate tides) in the Yellow River Delta...

An invasive species erodes the performance of coastal wetland protected areas

Junlin Ren, Jianshe Chen, Changlin Xu, Johan Van De Koppel, Mads Thomsen, Shi-Yun Qiu, Fangyan Cheng, Wanjuan Song, Quan-Xing Liu, Chi Xu, Junhong Bai, Yihui Zhang, Baoshan Cui, Mark Bertness, Brian Silliman, Bo Li & Qiang He
The world has increasingly relied upon protected areas (PAs) to rescue highly valued ecosystems from human activities, but whether PAs will fare well with bioinvasions remains unknown. By analyzing three decades of seven largest coastal PAs in China, including multiple World Natural Heritage and/or Wetlands of International Importance sites, we show that although PAs are achieving success in rescuing iconic wetlands and critical shorebird habitats from once widespread reclamation, this success is counteracted by escalating...

Densities of mollusc species at different sites along the Chinese coast

He-Bo Peng, Ying-Chi Chan, Tanya Compton, Xue-Fei Cheng, David Melville, Shou-Dong Zhang, Zhengwang Zhang, Guangchun Lei, Zhijun Ma & Theunis Piersma
Aim: Molluscs are important grazers, filter and deposit feeders, scavengers and predators, which in turn are food for shorebirds, fish and people. Some species, targeted as human food, have been cultured along the Chinese coast for hundreds of years. To examine whether aquacultural practices have meanwhile affected biodiversity gradients, we measured mollusc community structure along the coast of China in habitats which are intensively used by humans. Location: Chinese coast Methods: We sampled 21 intertidal...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
    6
  • Beijing Normal University
    3
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • Fudan University
    2
  • Xiamen University
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Nanjing University
    1
  • San Diego State University
    1
  • University of Miami
    1
  • Caribbean Research and Management of Biodiversity Foundation
    1