4 Works

Data from: The role of scent marking in mate selection by female pumas (Puma concolor)

Maximilian L. Allen, Heiko U. Wittmer, Paul Houghtaling, Justine A. Smith, L. Mark Elbroch, Christopher C. Wilmers & Justine Smith
Mate selection influences individual fitness, is often based on complex cues and behaviours, and can be difficult to study in solitary species including carnivores. We used motion-triggered cameras at 29 community scrapes (i.e. scent marking locations used by multiple individuals) and home range data from 39 GPS-collared pumas (Puma concolor) to assess the relevance of communication behaviours for mate selection by female pumas in California. Female pumas visited community scrapes irregularly and visitation bouts appeared...

Data from: Fenced and fragmented: conservation value of managed metapopulations

Susan M. Miller, Paulette Bloomer, Cindy K. Harper, Jennifer Hofmeyr & Paul J. Funston
Population fragmentation is threatening biodiversity worldwide. Species that once roamed vast areas are increasingly being conserved in small, isolated areas. Modern management approaches must adapt to ensure the continued survival and conservation value of these populations. In South Africa, a managed metapopulation approach has been adopted for several large carnivore species, all protected in isolated, relatively small, reserves that are fenced. As far as possible these approaches are based on natural metapopulation structures. In this...

Data from: Structural habitat predicts functional dispersal habitat of a large carnivore: how leopards change spots

Julien Fattebert, Hugh S. Robinson, Guy Balme, Rob Slotow & Luke Hunter
Natal dispersal promotes inter-population linkage, and is key to spatial distribution of populations. Degradation of suitable landscape structures beyond the specific threshold of an individual's ability to disperse can therefore lead to disruption of functional landscape connectivity and impact metapopulation function. Because it ignores behavioral responses of individuals, structural connectivity is easier to assess than functional connectivity and is often used as a surrogate for landscape connectivity modeling. However using structural resource selection models as...

Data from: Spatial overlap in a solitary carnivore: support for the land-tenure, kinship, or resource dispersion hypotheses?

L. Mark Elbroch, Patrick E. Lendrum, Howard Quigley & Anthony Caragiulo
1. There are several alternative hypotheses about the effects of territoriality, kinship, and prey availability on individual carnivore distributions within populations. The first is the land-tenure hypothesis, which predicts that carnivores regulate their density through territoriality and temporal avoidance. The second is the kinship hypothesis, which predicts related individuals will be clumped within populations, and the third is the resource dispersion hypothesis, which suggests that resource richness may explain variable sociality, spatial overlap, or temporary...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Panthera Corporation
    4
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • South African National Parks
    1
  • Tshwane University of Technology
    1
  • University of Cape Town
    1
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    1
  • American Museum of Natural History
    1
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal
    1