8 Works

Data from: A genetic discontinuity in moose (Alces alces) in Alaska corresponds with fenced transportation infrastructure

Robert E. Wilson, Sean D. Farley, Thomas J. McDonough, Sandra L. Talbot & Perry S. Barboza
The strength and arrangement of movement barriers can impact the connectivity among habitat patches. Anthropogenic barriers (e.g. roads) are a source of habitat fragmentation that can disrupt these resource networks and can have an influence on the spatial genetic structure of populations. Using microsatellite data, we evaluated whether observed genetic structure of moose (Alces alces) populations were associated with human activities (e.g. roads) in the urban habitat of Anchorage and rural habitat on the Kenai...

Data from: Population structure of two rabies hosts relative to the known distribution of rabies virus variants in Alaska

Elizabeth W. Goldsmith, Benjamin Renshaw, Christopher J. Clement, Elizabeth A. Himschoot, Kris J. Hundertmark & Karsten Hueffer
For pathogens that infect multiple species the distinction between reservoir hosts and spillover hosts is often difficult. In Alaska, three variants of the arctic rabies virus exist with distinct spatial distributions. We test the hypothesis that rabies virus variant distribution corresponds to the population structure of the primary rabies hosts in Alaska, arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) and red foxes (V. vulpes) in order to possibly distinguish reservoir and spill over hosts. We used mitochondrial DNA...

Data from: Climate change impacts on bumblebees converge across continents

Jeremy T. Kerr, Alana Pindar, Paul Galpern, Laurence Packer, Stuart M. Roberts, Pierre Rasmont, Oliver Schweiger, Sheila R. Colla, Leif L. Richardson, David L. Wagner, Lawrence F. Gall, Derek S. Sikes & Alberto Pantoja
For many species, geographical ranges are expanding toward the poles in response to climate change, while remaining stable along range edges nearest the equator. Using long-term observations across Europe and North America over 110 years, we tested for climate change–related range shifts in bumblebee species across the full extents of their latitudinal and thermal limits and movements along elevation gradients. We found cross-continentally consistent trends in failures to track warming through time at species’ northern...

Data from: Becoming pure: identifying generational classes of admixed individuals within lesser and greater scaup populations

Philip Lavretsky, Jeffrey Peters, Kevin Winker, Volker Bahn, Irina Kulikova, Yuri Zhuravlev, Robert Wilson, Christopher Barger, Kirsty Gurney, Kevin McCracken, Jeffrey L. Peters, Chris Barger & Kevin G. McCracken
Estimating the frequency of hybridization is important to understand its evolutionary consequences and its effects on conservation efforts. In this study, we examined the extent of hybridization in two sister species of ducks that hybridize. We used mitochondrial control region sequences and 3,589 double-digest restriction-associated DNA sequences (ddRADseq) to identify admixture between wild lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and greater scaup (A. marila). Among 111 individuals, we found one introgressed mitochondrial DNA haplotype in lesser scaup...

Data from: Spatial soil heterogeneity has a greater effect on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and plant growth than genetic modification with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes

Tanya E. Cheeke, Ursel M. Schütte, Chris M. Hemmerich, Mitchell B. Cruzan, Todd N. Rosenstiel & James D. Bever
Maize, genetically modified with the insect toxin genes of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), is widely cultivated, yet its impacts on soil organisms are poorly understood. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbiotic associations with plant roots and may be uniquely sensitive to genetic changes within a plant host. In this field study, the effects of nine different lines of Bt maize and their corresponding non-Bt parental isolines were evaluated on AMF colonization and community diversity in plant...

Data from: Evolution of stickleback in 50 years on earthquake-uplifted islands

Emily A. Lescak, Susan L. Bassham, Julian Catchen, Ofer Gelmond, Mary L. Sherbick, Frank A. Von Hippel & William A. Cresko
How rapidly can animal populations in the wild evolve when faced with sudden environmental shifts? Uplift during the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake abruptly created freshwater ponds on multiple islands in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska. In the short time since the earthquake, the phenotypes of resident freshwater threespine stickleback fish on at least three of these islands have changed dramatically from their oceanic ancestors. To test the hypothesis that these freshwater populations...

Data from: Feather corticosterone reveals stress associated with dietary changes in a breeding seabird

Alexis P. Will, Yutaka Watanuki, Dale M. Kikuchi, Nobuhiko Sato, Motohiro Ito, Matt Callahan, Katherine Wynne-Edwards, Scott Hatch, Kyle H. Elliott, Leslie Slater, Akinori Takahashi, Alexander S. Kitaysky, Kyle Elliott, Alexis Will & Alexander Kitaysky
Changes in climate and anthropogenic pressures might affect the composition and abundance of forage fish in the world's oceans. The junk-food hypothesis posits that dietary shifts that affect the quality (e.g., energy content) of food available to marine predators may impact their physiological state and consequently affect their fitness. Previously, we experimentally validated that deposition of the adrenocortical hormone, corticosterone, in feathers is a sensitive measure of nutritional stress in seabirds. Here, we use this...

Data from: Age specific survival rates of Steller sea lions at rookeries with divergent population trends in the Russian Far East

Alexey V. Altukhov, Russel D. Andrews, Donald G. Calkins, Thomas S. Gelatt, Eliezer D. Gurarie, Thomas R. Loughlin, Evgeny G. Mamaev, Victor S. Nikulin, Peter A. Permyakov, Sergey D. Ryazanov, Vladimir V. Vertyankin & Vladimir N. Burkanov
After a dramatic population decline, Steller sea lions have begun to recover throughout most of their range. However, Steller sea lions in the Western Aleutians and Commander Islands are continuing to decline. Comparing survival rates between regions with different population trends may provide insights into the factors driving the dynamics, but published data on vital rates have been extremely scarce, especially in regions where the populations are still declining. Fortunately, an unprecedented dataset of marked...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    8

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    8
  • Alaska Department of Fish and Game
    2
  • University of Calgary
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Alaska SeaLife Center
    1
  • Portland State University
    1
  • University of Saskatchewan
    1
  • University of Vermont
    1
  • McGill University
    1