17 Works

Data from: Maternal and nourishment factors interact to influence offspring developmental trajectories in social wasps

Jennifer M. Jandt, Sainath Suryanarayanan, John C. Hermanson, Robert L. Jeanne & Amy L. Toth
The social and nutritional environments during early development have the potential to affect offspring traits, but the mechanisms and molecular underpinnings of these effects remain elusive. We used Polistes fuscatus paper wasps to dissect how maternally controlled factors (vibrational signals and nourishment) interact to induce different caste developmental trajectories in female offspring, leading to worker or reproductive (gyne) traits. We established a set of caste phenotype biomarkers in P. fuscatus females, finding that gyne-destined individuals...

Data from: Heritability and social brood effects on personality in juvenile and adult life-history stages in a wild passerine

Isabel S. Winney, Julia Schroeder, Shinichi Nakagawa, Yu-Hsun Hsu, Mirre J. Simons, Alfredo Sánchez-Tójar, Maria-Elena Mannarelli & Terry Burke
How has evolution led to the variation in behavioural phenotypes (personalities) in a population? Knowledge of whether personality is heritable, and to what degree it is influenced by the social environment, is crucial to understanding its evolutionary significance, yet few estimates are available from natural populations. We tracked three behavioural traits during different life-history stages in a pedigreed population of wild house sparrows. Using a quantitative genetic approach, we demonstrated heritability in adult exploration, and...

Data from: Save your host, save yourself? caste-ratio adjustment in a parasite with division of labor and snail host survival following shell damage

Colin MacLeod, Robert Poulin & Clément Lagrue
Shell damage and parasitic infections are frequent in gastropods, influencing key snail host life-history traits such as survival, growth, and reproduction. However, their interactions and potential effects on hosts and parasites have never been tested. Host–parasite interactions are particularly interesting in the context of the recently discovered division of labor in trematodes infecting marine snails. Some species have colonies consisting of two different castes present at varying ratios; reproductive members and nonreproductive soldiers specialized in...

Data from: Sperm competition risk drives rapid ejaculate adjustments mediated by seminal fluid

Michael J. Bartlett, Tammy E. Steeves, Neil J. Gemmell & Patrice C. Rosengrave
In many species, males can make rapid adjustments to ejaculate performance in response to sperm competition risk; however, the mechanisms behind these changes are not understood. Here, we manipulate male social status in an externally fertilising fish, chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and find that in less than 48 hr, males can upregulate sperm velocity when faced with an increased risk of sperm competition. Using a series of in vitro sperm manipulation and competition experiments, we...

Data from: Evidence that fertility trades off with early offspring fitness as males age

Sheri L. Johnson, Sylvia Zellhuber-McMillan, Joanne Gillum, Jessica Dunleavy, Jonathan P. Evans, Shinichi Nakagawa & Neil J. Gemmell
Models of aging predict that sperm function and fertility should decline with age as sperm are exposed to free radical damage and mutation accumulation. However, theory also suggests that mating with older males should be beneficial for females because survival to old age is a demonstration of a male’s high genetic and/or phenotypic quality. Consequently, declines in sperm fitness may be offset by indirect fitness benefits exhibited in offspring. While numerous studies have investigated age-based...

Data from: Quantifying apart what belongs together: a multi-state species distribution modeling framework for species using distinct habitats

Veronica F. Frans, Amélie A. Augé, Hendrik A. Edelhoff, Stefan Erasmi, Niko Balkenhol, Jan O. Engler & Hendrik Edelhoff
1. Species distribution models (SDMs) have been used to inform scientists and conservationists about the status and change of occurrence patterns in threatened species. Many mobile species use multiple functionally distinct habitats, and cannot occupy one habitat type without the other being within a reachable distance. For such species, classical applications of SDMs might lead to erroneous representations of habitat suitability, as the complex relationships between predictors are lost when merging occurrence information across multiple...

Data from: Logging increases the functional and phylogenetic dispersion of understorey plant communities in tropical lowland rainforest

Timm F. Döbert, Bruce L. Webber, John B. Sugau, Katharine J. M. Dickinson & Raphael K. Didham
1. Logging is a major driver of tropical forest degradation, with severe impacts on plant richness and composition. Rarely have these effects been considered in terms of their impact on the functional and phylogenetic diversity of understorey plant communities, despite the direct relevance to community reassembly trajectories. Here, we test the effects of logging on functional traits and evolutionary relatedness, over and above effects that can be explained by changes in species richness alone. We...

Data from: Logging, exotic plant invasions, and native plant reassembly in a lowland tropical rain forest

Timm F. Döbert, Bruce L. Webber, John B. Sugau, Katharine J. M. Dickinson & Raphael K. Didham
Habitat modification and biological invasions are key drivers of global environmental change. However, the extent and impact of exotic plant invasions in modified tropical landscapes remains poorly understood. We examined whether logging drives exotic plant invasions, and whether their combined influences alter understory plant community composition in lowland rain forests in Borneo. We tested the relationship between understory communities and local- and landscape-scale logging intensity, using leaf area index (LAI) and above-ground biomass (AGB) data...

Data from: Population demography and heterozygosity-fitness correlations in natural guppy populations: an examination using sexually selected fitness traits

Catherine E. Grueber, John L. Fitzpatrick, Alessandro Devigili, Clelia Gasparini, Indar W. Ramnarine & Jonathan P. Evans
Heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) have been examined in a wide diversity of contexts, and the results are often used to infer the role of inbreeding in natural populations. Although population demography, reflected in population-level genetic parameters such as allelic diversity or identity disequilibrium, is expected to play a role in the emergence and detectability of HFCs, direct comparisons of variation in HFCs across many populations of the same species, with different genetic histories, are rare. Here,...

Data from: Early spring phytoplankton dynamics in the western Antarctic Peninsula

Kevin R. Arrigo, Gert L. Van Dijken, Anne-Carlijn Alderkamp, Zachary K. Erickson, Kate M. Lewis, Kate E. Lowry, Hannah L. Joy-Warren, Rob Middag, Janice E. Nash-Arrigo, Virginia Selz, Willem H. Van De Poll & Willem Van De Poll
The Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research program has sampled waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula (wAP) annually each summer since 1990. However, information about the wAP prior to the peak of the phytoplankton bloom in January is sparse. Here we present results from a spring process cruise that sampled the wAP in the early stages of phytoplankton bloom development in 2014. Sea ice concentrations were high on the shelf relative to non-shelf waters, especially toward the...

Data from: Reciprocal translocation of small numbers of inbred individuals rescues immunogenetic diversity

Catherine E. Grueber, Jolene T. Sutton, Sol Heber, James V. Briskie, Ian G. Jamieson & Bruce C. Robertson
Genetic rescue can reduce inbreeding depression and increase fitness of small populations, even when the donor populations are highly inbred. In a recent experiment involving two inbred island populations of the South Island robin, Petroica australis, reciprocal translocations improved microsatellite diversity and individual fitness. While microsatellite loci may reflect patterns of genome-wide diversity, they generally do not indicate the specific genetic regions responsible for increased fitness. We tested the effectiveness of this reciprocal translocation for...

Data from: Getting there and around: host range oscillations during colonisation of the Canary Islands by the parasitic nematode Spauligodon

Fátima Jorge, Ana Perera, Robert Poulin, Vicente Roca & Miguel A. Carretero
Episodes of expansion and isolation in geographic range over space and time, during which parasites have the opportunity to expand their host range, are linked to the development of host-parasite mosaic assemblages and parasite diversification. In this study we investigated whether island colonisation events lead to host range oscillations in a taxon of host-specific parasitic nematodes of the genus Spauligodon in the Canary Islands. We further investigated if range oscillations also resulted in shifts in...

Data from: Personality-matching habitat choice, rather than behavioural plasticity, is a likely driver of a phenotype–environment covariance

Benedikt Holtmann, Eduardo S.A. Santos, Carlos E. Lara, Shinichi Nakagawa & Eduardo S. A. Santos
An emerging hypothesis of animal personality posits that animals choose the habitat that best fits their personality, and that the match between habitat and personality can facilitate population differentiation, and eventually speciation. However, behavioural plasticity and the adjustment of behaviours to new environments have been a classical explanation for such matching patterns. Using a population of dunnocks (Prunella modularis), we empirically tested whether personality or behavioural plasticity is responsible for the non-random distribution of shy...

Data from: Analysis of the genome of the New Zealand giant collembolan (Holacanthella duospinosa) sheds light on hexapod evolution

Chen Wu, Melissa D. Jordan, Richard D. Newcomb, Neil J. Gemmell, Sarah Bank, Karen Meusemann, Peter K. Dearden, Elizabeth J. Duncan, Sefanie Grosser, Kim Rutherford, Paul P. Gardner, Ross N. Crowhurst, Bernd Steinwender, Leah K. Tooman, Mark I. Stevens & Thomas R. Buckley
Background: The New Zealand collembolan genus Holacanthella contains the largest species of springtails (Collembola) in the world. Using Illumina technology we have sequenced and assembled a draft genome and transcriptome from Holacanthella duospinosa (Salmon). We have used this annotated assembly to investigate the genetic basis of a range of traits critical to the evolution of the Hexapoda, the phylogenetic position of H. duospinosa and potential horizontal gene transfer events. Results: Our genome assembly was ~375...

Data from: How disturbance and dispersal influence intraspecific structure

Ceridwen I. Fraser, Ian D. Davies, David Bryant & Jonathan M. Waters
1. Recent studies have suggested that spatial patterns of intraspecific diversity can be influenced by density-dependent processes, which can inhibit effective migration of new lineages to established populations. How mechanisms such as dispersal and disturbance influence these processes is, however, still poorly understood. 2. We hypothesised that i) species with leptokurtic dispersal (frequent on small scales but rare on larger scales) would show no spatial structure on small scales and strong structure on large scales,...

Data from: Age-dependent trajectories differ between within-pair and extra-pair paternity success

Yu-Hsun Hsu, Mirre J. P. Simons, Julia Schroeder, Antje Girndt, Isabel S. Winney, Terry Burke, Shinichi Nakagawa & Y.-H. Hsu
Reproductive success is associated with age in many taxa, increasing in early life followed by reproductive senescence. In socially monogamous, but genetically polygamous species, this generates the interesting possibility of differential trajectories of within-pair and extra-pair siring success with age in males. We investigate these relationships simultaneously using within-individual analyses with 13 years of data from an insular house sparrow (Passer domesticus) population. As expected, we found that both within- and extra-pair paternity success increased...

Data from: Investigating trehalose synthesis genes after cold acclimation in the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1

A.C. Seybold, David A. Wharton, Michael A.S. Thorne & Craig J. Marshall
Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 is a freeze-tolerant Antarctic nematode which survives extensive intracellular ice formation. The molecular mechanisms of this extreme adaptation are still poorly understood. We recently showed that desiccation-enhanced RNA interference (RNAi) soaking can be used in conjunction with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to screen for phenotypes associated with reduced expression of candidate genes in Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1. Here, we present the use of this approach to investigate the role of trehalose synthesis...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • University of Otago
    17
  • University of Western Australia
    4
  • UNSW Sydney
    3
  • University of Canterbury
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    2
  • University of Sydney
    2
  • Forest Research
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • University of Padua
    1