29 Works

Invasive earthworm and native plant traits

Lise Thouvenot, Olga Ferlian, Rémy Beugnon, Tom Künne, Alfred Lochner, Madhav P. Thakur, Manfred Türke & Nico Eisenhauer

In the eye of the beholder: Is color classification consistent amongst human observers?

Kim Valenta, Sally Bornbusch, Yan-Daniel Jacques & Omer Nevo
Colorful displays have evolved in multiple plant and animal species as signals to mutualists, antagonists, competitors, mates, and other potential receivers. Studies of color have long relied on subjective classifications of color by human observers. However, humans have a limited ability to perceive color compared to other animals, and human biological, cultural, and environmental variables can influence color perception. Here, we test the consistency of human color classification using fruit color as a model system....

Vulnerability of grassland seed banks to resource-enhancing global changes

Anu Eskelinen, Elise Elwood, Susan Harrison, Eva Beyen & Jennifer Gremer
Soil seed banks represent reservoirs of diversity in the soil that may increase resilience of communities to global changes. Two global change factors that can dramatically alter the composition and diversity of aboveground communities are nutrient enrichment and increased rainfall. In a full-factorial nutrient and rainfall addition experiment in an annual Californian grassland, we asked whether shifts in aboveground composition and diversity were reflected in belowground seed banks. Nutrient and rainfall additions increased exotic and...

Data from: Tree species rather than type of mycorrhizal association drives inorganic and organic nitrogen acquisition in tree-tree interactions

Judy Simon, Robert Reuter, Olga Ferlian, Mika Tarkka, Nico Eisenhauer & Karin Pritsch
A field study was conducted to evaluate the effects of associated mycorrhization type on tree-tree interactions using the framework of the MyDiv tree diversity experiment established at the Bad Lauchstädt Experimental Research Station of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany). Inorganic and organic net N uptake capacity was quantified in fine roots of AM (i.e. Acer pseudoplatanus L., Fraxinus excelsior L., and Prunus avium L.) as well as EM associated tree species...

Changes in salt marsh detritivore identity influences on ecosystem multifunctionality

Jes Hines
Ecosystems world-wide experience changes in species composition in response to natural and anthropogenic changes in environmental conditions. Research to date has greatly improved our understanding of how species affect focal ecosystem functions. However, because measurements of multiple ecosystem functions have not been consistently justified for any given trophic group, it is unclear whether interpretations of research syntheses adequately reflect the contributions of consumers to ecosystems. Using model communities assembled in experimental microcosms, we examined the...

Data for: Environmental and anthropogenic constraints on animal space use drive extinction risk worldwide

Myriam R. Hirt, Andrew D. Barnes, Alessandro Gentile, Laura J. Pollock, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Wilfried Thuiller, Marlee A. Tucker & Ulrich Brose
Animals require a certain amount of habitat to persist and thrive, and habitat loss is one of the most critical drivers of global biodiversity decline. While habitat requirements have been predicted by relationships between species traits and home range size, little is known about constraints imposed by environmental conditions and human impacts on a global scale. Our meta-analysis of 395 vertebrate species shows that global climate gradients in temperature and precipitation exert indirect effects via...

Effects of large herbivores on fire regimes and wildfire mitigation

Julia Rouet-Leduc, Guy Pe'er, Francisco Moreira, Aletta Bonn, Wouter Helmer, S. Alain Aidan Shahsavan Zadeh, Alexander Zizka & Fons Van Der Plas
1. Abandonment of agricultural land is widespread in many parts of the world, leading to shrub and tree encroachment. The increase of flammable plant biomass, i.e. fuel load, increases the risk and intensity of wildfires. Fuel reduction by herbivores is a promising management strategy to avoid fuel build-up and mitigate wildfires. However, their effectiveness in mitigating wildfire damage may depend on a range of factors, including herbivore type, population density and feeding patterns. 2. Here...

Fruit hardness, size, and weight for wild fruits in Uganda and Madagascar

Kim Valenta & Omer Nevo
Fleshy fruits have evolved to be attractive to frugivorous seed dispersers. As a result, many fruit traits like size, color, scent and nutritional content are assumed to be the result of selective pressures exerted by frugivores. At the same time, fruit traits are also subjected to a set of other selective pressures and constraints. One such trait is fruit hardness. On one hand, haptic cues have been suggested to play a role in frugivore behavior,...

Date From: The myriad of complex demographic responses of terrestrial mammals to climate change and gaps of knowledge: A global analysis

Maria Paniw, Tamora James, C. Ruth Archer, Gesa Römer, Sam Levin, Aldo Compagnoni, Judy Che-Castaldo, Joanne Bennett, Andrew Mooney, Dylan Childs, Arpat Ozgul, Owen Jones, Jean Burns, Andrew Beckerman, Abir Patwari, Nora Sanchez-Gassen, Tiffany Knight & Roberto Salguero-Gómez
Approximately 25% of mammals are currently threatened with extinction, a risk that is amplified under climate change. Species persistence under climate change is determined by the combined effects of climatic factors on multiple demographic rates (survival, development, reproduction), and hence, population dynamics. Thus, to quantify which species and regions on Earth are most vulnerable to climate-driven extinction, a global understanding of how different demographic rates respond to climate is urgently needed. Here, we perform a...

Expert-based assessment of rewilding indicates progress at site-level, yet challenges for upscaling

Josiane Segar, Henrique Pereira, Raquel Filgueiras, Alexandros Karamanlidis, Deli Saavedra & Néstor Fernández
Rewilding is gaining importance across Europe, as agricultural abandonment trajectories provide opportunities for large-scale ecosystem restoration. However, its effective implementation is hitherto limited, in part due to a lack of monitoring of rewilding interventions and their interactions. Here, we provide a first assessment of rewilding progress across seven European sites. Using an iterative and participatory Delphi technique to standardize and analyze expert-based knowledge of these sites, we 1) map rewilding interventions onto the three central...

Natural disturbance impacts on trade-offs and co-benefits of forest biodiversity and carbon

Martin Mikoláš, Marek Svitok, Radek Bače, Garrett Meigs, William Keeton, Heather Keith, Arne Buechling, Volodymyr Trotsiuk, Kurt Bollmann, Krešimir Begovič, Vojtěch Čada, Oleh Chaskovskyy, Dheeraj Ralhan, Martin Dušátko, Matej Ferenčík, Michal Frankovič, Rhiannon Gloor, Jeňýk Hofmeister, Pavel Janda, Ondrej Kameniar, Daniel Kozák, Jana Lábusová, Linda Majdanová, Thomas Nagel, Jakob Pavlin … & Miroslav Svoboda
With accelerating environmental change, understanding the influence of forest disturbances and trade-offs between biodiversity and carbon dynamics is of high socio-economic importance. Most studies, however, have assessed immediate or short-term effects of disturbance, while long-term impacts remain poorly understood. Here, using a tree-ring-based approach, we modelled the effect of 250 years of disturbances on present-day biodiversity indicators and carbon dynamics in well-preserved European temperate primary forests. Our results indicated that disturbance legacies spanning centuries shaped...

An ecoregion-based approach to restoring the world’s intact large mammal assemblages

Carly Vynne, Joe Gosling, Calum Maney, Eric Dinerstein, Andy T. L. Lee, Neil Burgess, Néstor Fernández, Sanjiv Fernando, Harshini Jhala, Yadvendradev Jhala, Reed Noss, Michael Proctor, Jan Schipper, José F. González-Maya, Anup Joshi, David Olson, William J. Ripple & Jens-Christian Svenning
Assemblages of large mammal species play a disproportionate role in the structure and composition of natural habitats. Loss of these assemblages destabilizes natural systems, while their recovery can restore ecological integrity. Here we take an ecoregion-based approach to identify landscapes that retain their historically present large mammal assemblages, and map ecoregions where reintroduction of 1–3 species could restore intact assemblages. Intact mammal assemblages occur across more than one-third of the 730 terrestrial ecoregions where large...

Invasive spread in meta-food-webs depends on landscape structure, fertilization and species characteristics

Johanna Häussler, Remo Ryser & Ulrich Brose
Land use change and biological invasions collectively threaten biodiversity. Yet, few studies have addressed how altering the landscape structure and nutrient supply can promote biological invasions and particularly invasive spread (the spread of an invader from the place of introduction), or asked whether and how these factors interact with biotic interactions and invader properties. We here bridge this knowledge gap by providing a holistic network-based approach. Our approach combines a trophic network model with a...

Plant history and soil history jointly influence the selection environment for plant species in a long-term grassland biodiversity experiment

Peter Dietrich, Nico Eisenhauer, Peter Otto & Christiane Roscher
Long-term biodiversity experiments have shown increasing strengths of biodiversity effects on plant productivity over time. However, little is known about rapid evolutionary processes in response to plant community diversity, which could contribute to explaining the strengthening positive relationship. To address this issue, we performed a transplant experiment with offspring of seeds collected from four grass species in a 14-year old biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). We used two- and six-species communities and removed the vegetation of...

Agriculture causes homogenization of plant-feeding nematode communities at the regional scale

Antonio Archidona-Yuste, Thorsten Wiegand, Nico Eisenhauer, Carolina Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Juan E. Palomares-Rius & Pablo Castillo
1. An emerging research line in conservation ecology addresses how environmental change drivers may cause the biotic homogenization of ecological communities by shifts in species diversity and community composition. While the drivers have been explored in unmanaged ecosystems and managed agricultural systems, this issue has received limited attention in regards to a key soil bioindicator organisms, soil nematodes. 2. In this study, we evaluated the effect of land-use change and intensification on the diversity of...

Data for: Plant diversity effects on herbivory are related to soil biodiversity and plant chemistry

Christian Ristok, Alexander Weinhold, Marcel Ciobanu, Yvonne Poeschl, Christiane Roscher, Fredd Vergara, Nico Eisenhauer & Nicole Van Dam
Insect herbivory is a key process in ecosystem functioning. While theory predicts that plant diversity modulates herbivory, the mechanistic links remain unclear. We postulated that the plant metabolome mechanistically links plant diversity and herbivory. In late summer and in spring, we assessed individual plant aboveground herbivory rates and metabolomes of seven plant species in experimental plant communities varying in plant species diversity and resource acquisition strategies. In the same communities, we also measured plant individual...

Fitness and fur colouration - testing the camouflage and thermoregulation hypotheses in an Arctic mammal

Cecilia Di Bernardi, Anne-Mathilde Thierry, Nina E. Eide, Diana E. Bowler, Lars Rød-Eriksen, Stefan Blumentrath, Lukas Tietgen, Brett Sandercock, Øystein Flagstad & Arild Landa
1. Selection for crypsis has been recognised as an important ecological driver of animal coloration, whereas the relative importance of thermoregulation is more contentious with mixed empirical support. A potential thermal advantage of darker individuals has been observed in a wide range of animal species. Arctic animals that exhibit colour polymorphisms and undergo seasonal colour moults are interesting study subjects for testing the two alternative hypotheses: demographic performance of different colour morphs might be differentially...

Pacific Introduced Flora (PacIFLora)

Michael Wohlwend, Dylan Craven, Patrick Weigelt, Hanno Seebens, Marten Winter, Holger Kreft, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Mark Van Kleunen, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, James Space, Philip Thomas & Tiffany Knight
The Pacific region has the highest density of naturalized plant species worldwide, which makes it an important area for research on the ecology, evolution and biogeography of biological invasions. While different data sources on naturalized plant species exist for the Pacific, there is no taxonomically and spatially harmonized database available for different subsets of species and islands. A comprehensive, accessible database containing the distribution of naturalized vascular plant species in the Pacific will enable new...

Environmental controls on butterfly occurrence and species richness in Israel: The importance of temperature over rainfall

Orr Comay, Oz Ben Yehuda, Racheli Schwartz-Tzachor, Dubi Benyamini, Israel Pe'er, Inbar Ktalav & Guy Pe’er
Aim Butterflies are considered important indicators representing the state of biodiversity and key ecosystem functions, but their use as bioindicators requires better understanding of how their observed response link to environmental factors. Moreover, better understanding how butterfly faunas vary with climate and land cover may be useful to estimate the potential impacts of various drivers, including climate change, botanical succession, grazing, and afforestation. It is particularly important to establish which species of butterflies are sensitive...

Data for: Winners and losers over 35 years of dragonfly and damselfly distributional change in Germany

Diana Bowler, David Eichenberg, Klaus-Jürgen Conze, Frank Suhling, Kathrin Baumann, Theodor Benken, André Bönsel, Torsten Bittner, Arne Drews, André Günther, Nick Isaac, Falk Petzold, Marcel Seyring, Torsten Spengler, Bernd Trockur, Christoph Willigalla, Helge Bruelheide, Florian Jansen & Aletta Bonn
Aim: Recent studies suggest insect declines in parts of Europe; however, the generality of these trends across different taxa and regions remains unclear. Standardized data are not available to assess large-scale, long-term changes for most insect groups but opportunistic citizen science data is widespread for some. Here, we took advantage of citizen science data to investigate distributional changes of Odonata. Location: Germany Methods: We compiled over 1 million occurrence records from different regional databases. We...

Earthworm invasion causes declines across soil fauna size classes and biodiversity facets in northern North American forests

Malte Jochum, Olga Ferlian, Madhav Thakur, Marcel Ciobanu, Bernhard Klarner, Jörg-Alfred Salamon, Lee Frelich, Ed Johnson & Nico Eisenhauer
Anthropogenic pressures alter the biodiversity, structure, and organization of biological communities with severe consequences for ecosystem processes. Species invasion is such a human-induced ecosystem change with pronounced impacts on recipient ecosystems. Around the globe, earthworms invade habitats and impact abiotic soil conditions and a wide range of above- and belowground organisms. In northern North America, where earthworms have been largely absent since the last glaciation period and most earthworm species present today have only been...

Do tradeoffs govern plant species responses to different global change treatments?

J. Adam Langley, Emily Grman, Kevin Wilcox, Meghan Avolio, Kimberly Komatsu, Scott Collins, Sally Koerner, Melinda Smith, Andrew Baldwin, William Bowman, Nona Chiariello, Anu Eskelinen, Harry Harmens, Mark Hovenden, Kari Klanderud, Rebecca McCulley, Vladimir Onipchenko, Clare Robinson & Katharine Suding
Plants are subject to tradeoffs among growth strategies such that adaptations for optimal growth in one condition can preclude optimal growth in another. Thus, we hypothesized that the response of plant species abundance to one global change treatment would relate inversely to the response to a second treatment, particularly for treatment combinations that accentuate distinct traits. To address this hypothesis, we examined plant species abundances in 39 global change experiments manipulating CO2, nitrogen, phosphorus, water,...

The R package enerscape: A general energy landscape framework for terrestrial movement ecology

Emilio Berti, Marco Davoli, Robert Buitenwerf, Alexander Dyer, Oskar Hansen, Myriam Hirt, Jens-Christian Svenning, Jördis Terlau, Ulrich Brose & Fritz Vollrath
Ecological processes and biodiversity patterns are strongly affected by how animals move through the landscape. However, it remains challenging to predict animal movement and space use. Here we present our new R package enerscape to quantify and predict animal movement in real landscapes based on energy expenditure. Enerscape integrates a general locomotory model for terrestrial animals with GIS tools in order to map energy costs of movement in a given environment, resulting in energy landscapes...

Data and codes to replicate the analysis in: The spatial ecology of conflicts: Unravelling patterns of wildlife damage at multiple scales

Carlos Bautista, Eloy Revilla, Teresa Berezowska-Cnota, Néstor Fernández, Javier Naves & Nuria Selva
Human encroachment into natural habitats is typically followed by conflicts derived from wildlife damages to agriculture and livestock. Spatial risk modelling is a useful tool to gain understanding of wildlife damage and mitigate conflicts. Although resource selection is a hierarchical process operating at multiple scales, risk models usually fail to address more than one scale, which can result in the misidentification of the underlying processes. Here, we addressed the multi-scale nature of wildlife damage occurrence...

An objective-based prioritization approach to support trophic complexity through ecological restoration

Emma Ladouceur, Jennifer McGowan, Patrick Huber, Hugh Possingham, Davide Scridel, Roel Van Klink, Peter Poschlod, Hans Cornelissen, Costantino Bonomi & Borja Jiménez-Alfaro
1. Reassembling ecological communities and rebuilding habitats through active restoration treatments requires curating the selection of plant species to use in seeding and planting mixes. Ideally, these mixes should be assembled based on attributes that support ecosystem function and services, promote plant and animal species interactions and ecological networks in restoration while balancing project constraints. Despite these critical considerations, it is common for species mixes to be selected opportunistically. Reframing the selection of seed mixes...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    29
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    6
  • Aarhus University
    3
  • University of Göttingen
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Leipzig University
    2
  • University of Rostock
    2
  • University of Konstanz
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1