21 Works

Incucyte data for infected cell colonized with Wolbachia or uncolonized

Irene Newton, Tamanash Bhattacharya & Richard Hardy
The ability of the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis to restrict RNA viruses is presently being leveraged to curb global transmission of arbovirus-induced diseases. Past studies have shown that virus replication is limited early in arthropod cells colonized by the bacterium, although it is unclear if this phenomenon is replicated in mosquito cells that first encounter viruses obtained through a vertebrate blood meal. Furthermore, these cellular events neither explain how Wolbachia limits dissemination of viruses between mosquito...

Intraspecific genetic variation underlying postmating reproductive barriers between species in the wild tomato clade (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon)

Cathleen Jewell, Simo Zhang, Matthew Gibson, Alejandro Tovar-Mendez, Bruce McClure & Leonie Moyle
A goal of speciation genetics is to understand how the genetic components underlying interspecific reproductive barriers originate within species. Unilateral incompatibility (UI) is a postmating prezygotic barrier in which pollen rejection in the female reproductive tract (style) occurs in only one direction of an interspecific cross. Natural variation in the strength of UI has been observed among populations within species in the wild tomato clade. In some cases, molecular loci underlying self-incompatibility (SI) are associated...

Data from: Limited biomass recovery from gold mining in Amazonian forests

Michelle Kalamandeen, Emanuel Gloor, Isaac Johnson, Shenelle Agard, Martin Katow, Ashmore Vanbrooke, David Ashley, Sarah A. Batterman, Guy Ziv, Kaslyn Collins-Holder, Oliver L. Phillips, Eduardo S. Brondizio, Ima Vieira & David Galbraith
Gold mining has rapidly increased across the Amazon Basin in recent years, especially in the Guiana shield, where it is responsible for >90% of total deforestation. However, the ability of forests to recover from gold mining activities remains largely unquantified. Forest inventory plots were installed on recently abandoned mines in two major mining regions in Guyana, and re-censused 18 months later, to provide the first ground-based quantification of gold mining impacts on Amazon forest biomass...

Recombination data for Wolbachia and Spiroplasma infected flies

Irene Newton & Kaeli Bryant
Wolbachia pipientis is an intracellular alphaproteobacterium that infects 40-60% of insect species and is well known for host reproductive manipulations. Although Wolbachia are primarily maternally transmitted, evidence of horizontal transmission can be found in incongruent host-symbiont phylogenies and recent acquisitions of the same Wolbachia strain by distantly related species. Parasitoids and predator-prey interactions may indeed facilitate the transfer of Wolbachia between insect lineages but it is likely that Wolbachia are acquired via introgression in many...

Anti-seizure medication use during pregnancy and risk of ASD and ADHD in children

Kelsey Wiggs, Martin Rickert, Ayesha Sujan, Patrick Quinn, Henrik Larsson, Paul Lichtenstein, Sara Oberg & Brian D'Onofrio
Objective: To determine whether children born to women who use anti-seizure medications (ASMs) during pregnancy have higher risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) independent of confounding factors. Methods: We used Swedish-register data (n=14,614 children born 1996-2011 and followed through 2013) to examine associations in children of women with epilepsy, using the largest sample to date and adjusting for a range of measured confounders. We examined maternal-reported first-trimester use of any ASM...

Supplementary data for: Primate phylogenomics uncovers multiple rapid radiations and ancient interspecific introgression

Dan Vanderpool, Bin Quang Minh, Robert Lanfear, Daniel Hughes, Shwetha Murali, R. Alan Harris, Muthuswamy Raveendran, Donna M. Muzny, Richard A. Gibbs, Kim C. Worley, Jeffrey Rogers, Matthew W. Hahn, Mark S. Hibbins & Robert J. Williamson
Our understanding of the evolutionary history of primates is undergoing continual revision due to ongoing genome sequencing efforts. Bolstered by growing fossil evidence, these data have led to increased acceptance of once controversial hypotheses regarding phylogenetic relationships, hybridization and introgression, and the biogeographical history of primate groups. Among these findings is a pattern of recent introgression between species within all major primate groups examined to date, though little is known about introgression deeper in time....

The evolutionary genetics of paternal care: how good genes and extra-pair copulation affect the trade-off between paternal care and mating success

Courtney Fitzpatrick, Colette Ciresi & Michael Wade
We investigate the evolution of a gene for paternal care, with pleiotropic effects on male mating fitness and offspring viability, with and without extra pair copulations (EPCs). We develop a population genetic model to examine how pleiotropic effects of a male mating advantage and paternal care are affected by ‘good genes’ and EPCs. Using this approach, we show that the relative effects of each on fitness do not always predict the evolutionary change. We then...

Longitudinal white-matter abnormalities in sports-related concussion: a diffusion MRI study of the NCAA-DoD CARE Consortium

Yu-Chien Wu, Jaroslaw Harezlak, Nahla Elsaid, Zikai Lin, Qiuting Wen, Sourajit Mustafi, Larry Riggen, Kevin Koch, Andrew Nencka, Timothy Meier, Andrew Mayer, Yang Wang, Christopher Giza, John DiFiori, Kevin Guskiewicz, Jason Mihalik, Stephen LaConte, Stefan Duma, Steven Broglio, Andrew Saykin, Michael McCrea & Thomas McAllister
Objective To study longitudinal recovery trajectories of white-matter after sports-related concussion (SRC), we performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on collegiate athletes who sustained SRC. Methods Collegiate athletes (n=219, 82 concussed athletes, 68 contact-sport controls, and 69 non-contact-sport controls) were included from the Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (CARE) Consortium. The participants completed clinical assessments and DTI at four time points: 24-48-hours post-injury, asymptomatic state, seven days following return-to-play, and six-months post-injury. Tract-based spatial statistics were...

Data from: A phylogeny for the Drosophila montium species group: a model clade for comparative analyses

William Conner, Emily Delaney, Michael Bronski, Paul Ginsberg, Timothy Wheeler, Kelly Richardson, Brooke Peckenpaugh, Kevin Kim, Masayoshi Watada, Ary Hoffmann, Michael Eisen, Artyom Kopp, Brandon Cooper & Michael Turelli
The Drosophila montium species group is a clade of 94 named species closely related to the model D. melanogaster species group. The montium species group is distributed over a broad geographic range throughout Asia, Africa, and Australasia. Species of this group possess a wide range of morphologies, mating behaviors, and endosymbiont associations, making this clade useful for comparative analyses. We use genomic data from 42 available species to estimate the phylogeny and relative divergence times...

Novel plant-microbe interactions: rapid evolution of a legume-rhizobium mutualism in restored prairies

Susan Magnoli & Jennifer Lau
1. When plants colonize new habitats, the novel interactions they form with new mutualists or enemies can immediately affect plant performance. These novel interactions also may provoke rapid evolutionary responses and can be ideal scenarios for investigating how species interactions influence plant evolution. 2. To explore how mutualists influence the evolution of colonizing plant populations, we capitalized on an experiment in which two former agricultural fields were seeded with identical prairie seed mixes in 2010....

Data from: Little giants: a rapidly invading seagrass alters ecosystem functioning relative to native foundation species

Ranjan Muthukrishnan, Kelcie L. Chiquillo, Candice Cross, Peggy Fong, Thomas Kelley, C. Anna Toline, Regina Zweng & Demian A. Willette
The spread of invasive species is a major component of global ecological change and how and when to manage particular species is a diicult empirical question. Ideally, these decisions should be based on the speciic impacts of invading species including both their efects on native competitors and how they may or may not play similar roles in broader ecosystem functioning. Halophila stipulacea is an invasive seagrass currently spreading through the Caribbean, and as seagrasses are...

Evolution in novel environments: do restored prairie populations experience strong selection?

Susan Magnoli & Jennifer Lau
When populations colonize new habitats, they are likely to experience novel environmental conditions, and as a consequence may experience strong selection. While selection and the resulting evolutionary responses may have important implications for establishment success in colonizing populations, few studies have estimated selection in such scenarios. Here we examined evidence of selection in recently established plant populations in two prairie restorations in close proximity (< 15 km apart) using two approaches: 1) we tested for...

The sunflower (Helianthus annuusL.) genome reflects a recent history of biased accumulation of transposable elements

S. Evan Staton, Bradley H. Bakken, Benjamin K. Blackman, Mark A. Chapman, Nolan C. Kane, Shunxue Tang, Mark C. Ungerer, Steven J. Knapp, Loren H. Rieseberg & John M. Burke
Aside from polyploidy, transposable elements are the major drivers of genome size increases in plants. Thus, understanding the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), especially given its large genome size (∼3.5 Gb) and the well‐documented cases of amplification of certain transposons within the genus, is of considerable importance for understanding the evolutionary history of this emerging model species. By analyzing approximately 25% of the sunflower genome from random sequence...

Parasite exposure and host susceptibility jointly drive the emergence of epidemics

Tara Stewart Merrill, Spencer Hall & Carla Cáceres
Parasite transmission is thought to depend on both parasite exposure and host susceptibility to infection; however, the relative contribution of these two factors to epidemics remains unclear. We used interactions between an aquatic host and its fungal parasite to evaluate how parasite exposure and host susceptibility interact to drive epidemics. In six lakes, we tracked the following factors from pre-epidemic to epidemic emergence: 1) parasite exposure (measured observationally as fungal spores attacking wild-caught hosts), 2)...

Shedding light on environmentally transmitted parasites: darker conditions within lakes promote larger epidemics

Clara Shaw, Spencer Hall, Erin Overholt, Carla Cáceres, Craig Williamson & Meghan Duffy
Parasite fitness depends on a successful journey from one host to another. For parasites that are transmitted environmentally, abiotic conditions might modulate the success of this journey. Here we evaluate how light, a key abiotic factor, influences spatiotemporal patterns of zooplankton disease where light varies seasonally, across lakes, and with depth in a lake. In an in situ experiment using those three sources of variation, we tested sensitivity of spores of two parasites to ambient...

Data from: Volatile fatty acid and aldehyde abundances evolve with behavior and habitat temperature in Sceloporus lizards

Stephanie Campos, Jake Pruett, Helena Soini, J. Jaime Zúñiga-Vega, Jay Goldberg, Cuauhcihuatl Vital-García, Milos Novotny, Diana Hews & Emília Martins
Animal signals evolve by striking a balance between the need to convey information through particular habitats and the limitations of what types of signals can most easily be produced and perceived. Here, we present new results from field measures of undisturbed behavior and biochemical analyses of scent marks from 12 species of Sceloporus lizards to explore whether evolutionary changes in chemical composition are better predicted by measures of species behavior , particularly those associated with...

A putative telomerase activator has tissue-specific effects on telomere length in a developing songbird

Sarah Wolf, Keegan Stansberry, Kristen Content & Kimberly Rosvall
There is good evidence that telomeres predict variation in health and longevity, yet it is unclear whether these patterns are causally derived from telomeres per se, in part because relatively little research directly manipulates telomere length during early life, when telomere shortening is most dynamic. Here, we test how the telomerase activator TA-65 (i.e., cycloastrogenol) affects telomere length in five tissues during the peak of growth in the wild tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor). Following 8...

Seasonal patterns of melatonin alter aggressive phenotypes of female Siberian hamsters

Nikki Rendon, Christopher Petersen, Kathleen Munley, Andrea Amez, Daniel Boyes, Marcy Kingsbury & Gregory Demas
Many animal species exhibit year-round aggression, a behaviour that allows individuals to compete for limited resources in their environment (e.g., food and mates). Interestingly, this high degree of territoriality persists during the non-breeding season, despite low levels of circulating gonadal steroids (i.e., testosterone [T] and oestradiol [E2]). Our previous work suggests that the pineal hormone melatonin mediates a ‘seasonal switch’ from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus); solitary, seasonally breeding...

The plot thickens: Haploid and triploid-like thalli, hybridization, and biased mating type ratios in Letharia

Sandra Lorena Ament-Velásquez, Veera Tuovinen, Linnea Bergström, Toby Spribille, Dan Vanderpool, Juri Nascimbene, Yoshikazu Yamamoto, Göran Thor & Hanna Johannesson
The study of the reproductive biology of lichen fungal symbionts has been traditionally challenging due to their complex and symbiotic lifestyles. Against the common belief of haploidy, a recent genomic study found a triploid-like signal in Letharia. Here, we used genomic data from a pure culture and from thalli, together with a PCR survey of the MAT locus, to infer the genome organization and reproduction in Letharia. We found that the read count variation in...

Data from: Trait plasticity alters the range of possible coexistence conditions in a competition-colonization trade-off

Ranjan Muthukrishnan, Lauren L. Sullivan, Allison Shaw & James Forester
Most of the classical theory on species coexistence has been based on species-level competitive trade-offs. However, it is becoming apparent that plant species display high levels of trait plasticity. The implications of this plasticity are almost completely unknown for most coexistence theory. Here, we model a competition-colonization trade-off and incorporate trait plasticity to evaluate its effects on coexistence. Our simulations show that the classic competition-colonization trade-off is highly sensitive to environmental circumstances and coexistence only...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • Indiana University
    21
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Missouri
    2
  • University of California Los Angeles
    2
  • Michigan State University
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Indiana State University
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    1
  • Rose–Hulman Institute of Technology
    1