12 Works

Agroecosystem diversification with legumes or non-legumes improves differently soil fertility according to soil type

Marie Sauvadet, Jean Trap, Gaëlle Damour, Claude Plassard, Karel Van Den Meersche, Raphaël Achard, Clémentine Allinne, Patrice Autfray, Isabelle Bertrand, Eric Blanchart, Péninna Deberdt, Séguy Enock, Jean-Daniel Essobo, Grégoire Freschet, Mickaël Hedde, Elias De Melo Virginio Filho, Bodovololona Rabary, Miora Rakotoarivelo, Richard Randriamanantsoa, Béatrice Rhino, Aude Ripoche, Elisabeth Rosalie, Stéphane Saj, Thierry Becquer, Philippe Tixier … & Jean-Michel Harmand
Plant diversification through crop rotation or agroforestry is a promising way to improve sustainability of agroecosystems. Nonetheless, criteria to select the most suitable plant communities for agroecosystems diversification facing contrasting environmental constraints need to be refined. Here, we compared the impacts of 24 different plant communities on soil fertility across six tropical agroecosystems: either on highly weathered Ferralsols, with strong P limitation, or on partially weathered soils derived from volcanic material, with major N limitation....

Data from: Spatial variability in soil organic carbon in a tropical montane landscape: associations between soil organic carbon and land use, soil properties, vegetation, and topography vary across plot to landscape scales

Marleen De Blécourt, Marife D. Corre, Ekananda Paudel, Rhett D. Harrison, Rainer Brumme & Edzo Veldkamp
Presently, the lack of data on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in relation to land-use types and biophysical characteristics prevents reliable estimates of ecosystem carbon stocks in montane landscapes of mainland SE Asia. Our study, conducted in a 10 000 ha landscape in Xishuangbanna, SW China, aimed at assessing the spatial variability in SOC concentrations and stocks, as well as the relationships of SOC with land-use types, soil properties, vegetation characteristics and topographical attributes at...

Data from: Functional diversity and composition of Caatinga woody flora are negatively impacted by chronic anthropogenic disturbance

Elâine M. S. Ribeiro, Madelon Lohbeck, Braulio A. Santos, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Marcelo Tabarelli & Inara A. Leal
Tropical plant assemblages can be taxonomically and phylogenetically impoverished by chronic anthropogenic disturbance (CAD), such as firewood collection and extensive grazing. However, to what extent the functional dimension responds to CAD is still unclear. Such knowledge is urgently required for predicting, preventing or even reversing the impacts of CAD. Chronic anthropogenic disturbance may operate as an ecological filter by selecting functional trait values (e.g. low wood density), thereby altering the functional composition and diversity of...

Data from: Land-use intensification effects on functional properties in tropical plant communities

Geovana Carreño-Rocabado, Marielos Peña-Claros, Frans Bongers, Sandra Díaz, Fabien Quétier, José Chuviña & Lourens Poorter
There is consensus that plant diversity and ecosystem processes are negatively affected by land-use intensification (LUI), but, at the same time, there is empirical evidence that a large heterogeneity can be found in the responses. This heterogeneity is especially poorly understood in tropical ecosystems. We evaluated changes in community functional properties across five common land-use types in the wet tropics with different land-use intensity: mature forest, logged forest, secondary forest, agricultural land, and pastureland, located...

Data from: Insights into the genetic relationships and breeding patterns of the African tea germplasm based on nSSR markers and cpDNA sequences

Moses C. Wambulwa, Muditha K. Meegahakumbura, Samson Kamunya, Alice Muchugi, Michael Moller, Jie Liu, Jian-Chu Xu, Sailesh Ranjitkar, De-Zhu Li & Lian-Ming Gao
Africa is one of the key centers of global tea production. Understanding the genetic diversity and relationships of cultivars of African tea is important for future targeted breeding efforts for new crop cultivars, specialty tea processing, and to guide germplasm conservation efforts. Despite the economic importance of tea in Africa, no research work has been done so far on its genetic diversity at a continental scale. Twenty-three nSSRs and three plastid DNA regions were used...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Wheat nutrient response functions for the East Africa highlands

Athanase R. Cyamweshi, Leon N. Nabahungu, Catherine J. Senkoro, Catherine Kibunja, Athanase Mukuralinda, Kayuki C. Kaizzi, Simon M. Mvuyekure, John Kayumba, Keziah W. Ndungu-Magiroi, Mary N. Koech, Charles S. Wortmann & Charles Wortmann
Wheat (Triticum æstivum L.) is an important East Africa highland crop but yields are low. Information is scarce for optimization of fertilizer use. Research was conducted to determine yield response functions for N, P and K, and to diagnose Mg–S–Zn–B deficiencies. The average grain yield increase in Rwanda due to N application was 1.5 Mg ha−1 with a mean economically optimal rate (EOR) of 68 kg ha−1 N. In Kenya and Tanzania, yield was increased...

Negative impacts of dominance on bee communities: Does the influence of invasive honey bees differ from native bees?

Lucas Alejandro Garibaldi, Lucas Garibaldi, Néstor Pérez-Méndez, Guaraci Cordeiro, Alice Hughes, Michael Orr, Isabel Alves Dos Santos, Breno Freitas, Favízia Freitas De Oliveira, Gretchen Lebuhn, Ignasi Bartomeus, Marcelo Aizen, Patricia Andrade, Betina Blochtein, Danilo Boscolo, Patricia Drumond, Maria Gaglianone, Barbara Gemmill-Herren, Rosana Halinski, Cristiane Krug, Marcia Maues, Lucia Piedade Kiill, Mardiore Pinheiro, Carmen Pires & Blandina Felipe Viana
Invasive species can reach high abundances and dominate native environments. One of the most impressive examples of ecological invasions is the spread of the African sub-species of the honey bee throughout the Americas, starting from its introduction in a single locality in Brazil. The invasive honey bee is expected to more negatively impact bee community abundance and diversity than native dominant species, but this has not been tested previously. We developed a comprehensive and systematic...

Characteristics of households that were interviewed in a study that investigated factors driving tree species in cocoa farms in Cote d'Ivoire

Alain R Atangana
1. Intensive cocoa production in Côte d’Ivoire, the World’s leading cocoa producer, has grown at the expense of forest cover. To reverse this trend, the country has adopted a ‘zero deforestation’ agricultural policy and committed to rehabilitate its forest cover through the planting of high-value tree species in cocoa landscapes using a participatory approach. However, less is known on the factors influencing farmers’ introduction of high-value tree species in cocoa landscapes. 2. We tested the...

Data from: Phylogenetic diversity correlated with aboveground biomass production during forest succession: evidence from tropical forests in Southeast Asia

Manichanh Satdichanh, Huaixia Ma, Kai Yan, Gbadamassi G.O. Dossa, Leigh Winowiecki, Tor-Gunnar Vågen, Anja Gassner, Jianchu Xu & Rhett D. Harrison
1. Enhancing knowledge on the role of evolutionary history during forest succession and its relationship with ecosystem function is particularly relevant in the context of forest landscape restoration for climate change mitigation and adaptation. 2. We used fine resolution vegetation and environmental data (soil, elevation and slope) from two large-scale surveys (320 x 1000 m2 plots in two 10 km x 10 km blocks) in the Upper Mekong to quantify (1) the role of abiotic...

Proximity to natural habitat and flower plantings increases insect populations and pollination services in South African apple orchards

Fabrizia Ratto, Peter Steward, Steven Sait, James Pryke, Rene Gaigher, Michael Samways & William Kunin
Introducing areas of wildflower vegetation within crop fields has been shown to enhance pollinator activity and pollination services to crops, and findings in Europe showed an interaction effect between floral treatments and landscape context. Natural fynbos patches in the South African Cape Floristic Region (CFR) are potential reservoirs for beneficial insects that could enhance pollinator populations and crop pollination in commercial apple orchards. However, the effect of proximity to natural habitat and floral enhancement treatments...

Chromosome evolution and the genetic basis of agronomically important traits in greater yam

Jessen Bredeson, Jessica Lyons, Ibukun Oniyinde, Nneka Okereke, Olufisayo Kolade, Ikenna Nnabue, Nneka Okereke, Christian Nwadili, Eva Hribova, Matthew Parker, Jeremiah Nwogha, Shengqiang Shu, Joseph Carlson, Robert Kariba, Samuel Muthemba, Katarzyna Knop, Geoffrey Barton, Anna Sherwood, Antonio Lopez-Montes, Robert Asiedu, Ramni Jamnadass, Alice Muchugi, David Goodstein, Chiedozie Egesi, Jonathan Featherston … & Daniel Rokhsar
The nutrient-rich tubers of the greater yam, Dioscorea alata L., provide food and income security for millions of people around the world. Despite its global importance, however, greater yam remains an ‘orphan crop.’ Here we address this resource gap by presenting a highly contiguous chromosome-scale genome assembly of D. alata combined with a dense genetic map derived from African breeding populations. The genome sequence reveals an ancient allotetraploidization in the Dioscorea lineage, followed by extensive...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    4
  • 2020
    1
  • 2019
    1
  • 2018
    3
  • 2017
    1
  • 2016
    1
  • 2015
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • World Agroforestry Centre
    12
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    3
  • Kunming Institute of Botany
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
    2
  • University of Padua
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1