13 Works

Data from: The morphology of the inner ear of squamate reptiles and its bearing on the origin of snakes

Alessandro Palci, Mark N. Hutchinson, Michael W. Caldwell & Michael S. Y. Lee
The inner ear morphology of 80 snake and lizard species, representative of a range of ecologies, is here analysed and compared to that of the fossil stem snake Dinilysia patagonica, using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Inner ear morphology is linked to phylogeny (we find here a strong phylogenetic signal in the data that can complicate ecological correlations), but also correlated with ecology, with Dinilysia resembling certain semi-fossorial forms (Xenopeltis and Cylindrophis), consistent with previous reports. We...

Data from: Comparative ecological transcriptomics and the contribution of gene expression to the evolutionary potential of a threatened fish

Chris J. Brauer, Peter J. Unmack & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Understanding whether small populations with low genetic diversity can respond to rapid environmental change via phenotypic plasticity is an outstanding research question in biology. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has recently provided the opportunity to examine variation in gene expression, a surrogate for phenotypic variation, in non-model species. We used a comparative RNA-seq approach to assess expression variation within and among adaptively divergent populations of a threatened freshwater fish, Nannoperca australis, found across a steep hydroclimatic gradient...

Data from: Experimental manipulation suggests effect of polyandry but not mate familiarity on within-pair aggression in the social skink, Liopholis whitii

Thomas Botterill-James, Jacinta Silince, Tobias Uller, David G. Chapple, Michael G. Gardner, Erik Wapstra, Geoffrey M. While & Jacinta Sillince
Long-term monogamy is a key characteristic of family living across animals. The evolutionary maintenance of long-term monogamy has been suggested to be facilitated by increased reproductive coordination as a result of mate familiarity, leading to increased reproductive success. However, such effects can be compromised if females mate outside the pair bond (e.g. female polyandry), introducing conflicts of interest between the male and female. Here, we experimentally test the effects of both mate familiarity and female...

Data from: Oxidative status and fitness components in the Seychelles warbler

Janske Van De Crommenacker, Martijn Hammers, Jildou Van Der Woude, Marina Louter, Peter Santema, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Oxidative damage, caused by reactive oxygen species during aerobic respiration, is thought to be an important mediator of life-history trade-offs. To mitigate oxidative damage, antioxidant defence mechanisms are deployed, often at the cost of resource allocation to other body functions. Both reduced resource allocation to body functions and direct oxidative damage may decrease individual fitness, through reducing survival and/or reproductive output. The oxidative costs of reproduction have gained much attention recently, but few studies have...

Data from: Genetic divergence between two phenotypically distinct bottlenose dolphin ecotypes suggests separate evolutionary trajectories

Pedro F. Fruet, Eduardo R. Secchi, Juliana C. Di Tullio, Paulo C. Simões-Lopes, Fábio Daura-Jorge, Ana Paula B. Costa, Els Vermeulen, Paulo André C. Flores, Rodrigo C. Genoves, Paula Laporta, Luciano B. Beheregaray & Luciana M. Möller
Due to their worldwide distribution and occupancy of different types of environments, bottlenose dolphins display considerable morphological variation. Despite limited understanding about the taxonomic identity of such forms and connectivity among them at global scale, coastal (or inshore) and offshore (or oceanic) ecotypes have been widely recognized in several ocean regions. In the Southwest Atlantic Ocean (SWA), however, there are scarce records of bottlenose dolphins differing in external morphology according to habitat preferences that resemble...

Data from: Theory, practice, and conservation in the age of genomics: the Galápagos giant tortoise as a case study

Stephen J. Gaughran, Maud C. Quinzin, Joshua M. Miller, Ryan C. Garrick, Danielle L. Edwards, Michael A. Russello, Nikos Poulakakis, Claudio Ciofi, Luciano B. Beheregaray, Aldalgisa Caccone & Adalgisa Caccone
Hgh-throughput DNA sequencing allows efficient discovery of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in non-model species. Population genetic theory predicts that this large number of independent markers should provide detailed insights into population structure, even when only a few individuals are sampled. Still, sampling design can have a strong impact on such inferences. Here, we use simulations and empirical SNP data to investigate the impacts of sampling design on estimating genetic differentiation among populations that...

Data from: Demographic collapse and low genetic diversity of the Irrawaddy dolphin population inhabiting the Mekong River

Michael Krützen, Isabel Beasley, Corinne Y. Ackermann, Dietmar Lieckfeldt, Arne Ludwig, Gerard E. Ryan, Lars Bejder, Guido J. Parra, Rebekka Wolfensberger & Peter B. S. Spencer
In threatened wildlife populations, it is important to determine whether observed low genetic diversity may be due to recent anthropogenic pressure or the consequence of historic events. Historical size of the Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) population inhabiting the Mekong River is unknown and there is significant concern for long-term survival of the remaining population as a result of low abundance, slow reproduction rate, high neonatal mortality, and continuing anthropogenic threats. We investigated population structure and...

Data from: Females drive asymmetrical introgression from rare to common species in Darwin's tree finches

Katharina J. Peters, Steven A. Myers, Rachael Y. Dudaniec, Jody A. O'Connor & Sonia Kleindorfer
The consequences of hybridization for biodiversity depend on the specific ecological and evolutionary context in which it occurs. Understanding patterns of gene flow among hybridizing species is crucial for determining the evolutionary trajectories of species assemblages. The recently discovered hybridization between two species of Darwin's tree finches (Camarhynchus parvulus and C. pauper) on Floreana Island, Galápagos, presents an exciting opportunity to investigate the mechanisms causing hybridization and its potential evolutionary consequences under conditions of recent...

Data from: Artificial barriers prevent genetic recovery of small isolated populations of a low-mobility freshwater fish

Rhys A. Coleman, Bertrand Gauffre, Alexandra Pavlova, Luciano B. Beheregaray, Joanne Kearns, Jarod Lyon, Minami Sasaki, Raphael Leblois, Carla Sgro & Paul Sunnucks
Habitat loss and fragmentation often result in small, isolated populations vulnerable to environmental disturbance and loss of genetic diversity. Low genetic diversity can increase extinction risk of small populations by elevating inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and reducing adaptive potential. Due to their linear nature and extensive use by humans, freshwater ecosystems are especially vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. Although the effects of fragmentation on genetic structure have been extensively studied in migratory fish, they...

Data from: Genotyping-by-sequencing for estimating relatedness in non-model organisms: avoiding the trap of precise bias

Catherine R.M. Attard, Luciano B. Beheregaray, Luciana M. Moller & Catherine R. M. Attard
There has been remarkably little attention to using the high resolution provided by genotyping-by-sequencing (i.e. RADseq and similar methods) datasets for assessing relatedness in wildlife populations. A major hurdle is the genotyping error, especially allelic dropout, often found in this type of dataset that could lead to downward-biased, yet precise, estimates of relatedness. Here we assess the applicability of genotyping-by-sequencing datasets for relatedness inferences given their relatively high genotyping error rates. Individuals of known relatedness...

Data from: Seascape genomics reveals adaptive divergence in a connected and commercially important mollusc, the greenlip abalone (Haliotis laevigata), along a longitudinal environmental gradient

Jonathan Sandoval-Castillo, Nick A. Robinson, Anthony M. Hart, Lachlan W. S. Strain & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Populations of broadcast spawning marine organisms often have large sizes and are exposed to reduced genetic drift. Under such scenarios, strong selection associated with spatial environmental heterogeneity is expected to drive localized adaptive divergence, even in the face of connectivity. We tested this hypothesis using a seascape genomics approach in the commercially important greenlip abalone (Haliotis laevigata). We assessed how its population structure has been influenced by environmental heterogeneity along a zonal coastal boundary in...

Data from: Ecological disturbance influences adaptive divergence despite high gene flow in golden perch (Macquaria ambigua): implications for management and resilience to climate change

Catherine R.M. Attard, Chris J. Brauer, Jonathan Sandoval-Castillo, Leanne K. Faulks, Peter Unmack, Dean M. Gilligan, Luciano B. Beheregaray, Peter J. Unmack & Catherine R. M. Attard
Populations that are adaptively divergent but maintain high gene flow may have greater resilience to environmental change as gene flow allows the spread of alleles that have already been tested elsewhere. In addition, populations naturally subjected to ecological disturbance may already hold resilience to future environmental change. Confirming this necessitates ecological genomic studies of high dispersal, generalist species. Here we perform one such study on golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) in the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), Australia...

Data from: Hoverfly locomotor activity is resilient to external influence and intrinsic factors

Malin Thyselius & Karin Nordström
Hoverflies are found across the globe, with approximately 6000 species described worldwide. Many hoverflies are being used in agriculture and some are emerging as model species for laboratory experiments. As such it is valuable to know more about their activity. Like many other dipteran flies, Eristalis hoverflies have been suggested to be strongly diurnal, but this is based on qualitative visualization by human observers. To quantify how hoverfly activity depends on internal and external factors,...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • Flinders University
    13
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • South Australian Museum
    2
  • University of Canberra
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • University of Crete
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Murdoch University
    1