269 Works

Influence of voltine ecotype and geographic distance on genetic and haplotype variation in the Asian corn borer

Brad Coates & Yangzhou Wang
Diapause is an adaptive dormancy strategy by which arthropods endure extended periods of adverse climatic conditions. Seasonal variation in larval diapause initiation and duration in the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis, influences adult mating generation number (voltinism) across local environmental conditions. Degree of mating period overlap between sympatric voltinism ecotypes influence hybridization level, but impact on O. furnacalis population genetic structure and evolution of divergent adaptive phenotypes remains uncertain. Genetic differentiation was estimated between voltinism...

Sequenced-based paternity analysis to improve breeding and identify self-incompatibility loci in intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium)

Jared Crain, Steve Larson, Kevin Dorn, Traci Hagedorn, Lee DeHaan & Jesse Poland
In outcrossing species such as intermediate wheatgrass (IWG, Thinopyrum intermedium), polycrossing is often used to generate novel recombinants through each cycle of selection, but it cannot track pollen-parent pedigrees and it is unknown how self-incompatibility (SI) genes may limit the number of unique crosses obtained. This study investigated the potential of using next-generation sequencing to assign paternity and identify putative SI loci in IWG. Using a reference population of 380 individuals made from controlled crosses...

Data from: Mean annual temperature influences local fine root proliferation in tropical montane wet forest

Suzanne Pierre, Timothy J. Fahey, Creighton Litton, Christian Giardina & Jed Sparks
Mean annual temperature (MAT) is an influential climate factor affecting the bioavailability of growth-limiting nutrients nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). In tropical montane wet forests, warmer MAT drives higher N bioavailability, while patterns of P availability are inconsistent across MAT. Two important nutrient acquisition strategies, fine root proliferation into bulk soil and root association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, are dependent on C availability to the plant via primary production. The case study presented here tests...

QTL mapping and marker development for tolerance to sulfur phytotoxicity in melon (Cucumis Melo)

Sandra Branham, James Daley, Amnon Levi, Richard Hassell & Patrick Wechter
Elemental sulfur is an effective, inexpensive fungicide for many foliar pathogens, but severe phytotoxicity prohibits its use on many melon varieties. Sulfur phytotoxicity causes chlorosis and necrosis of leaf tissue, leading to plant death in the most sensitive lines, while other varieties have little to no damage. A high-density, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)-based genetic map of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population segregating for sulfur tolerance was used for a quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping study of...

Not a melting pot: plant species aggregate in their non-native range

Gisela C. Stotz, James F. Cahill, Jonathan A. Bennett, Cameron N. Carlyle, Edward W. Bork, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Sandra Díaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Batdelger Erdenetsetseg, Alessandra Fidelis, Heath W. Garris, Hugh A.L. Henry, Anke Jentsch, Mohammad Hassan Jouri, Kadri Koorem, Peter Manning … & Lauchlan H. Fraser
Aim: Plant species continue to be moved outside of their native range by human activities. Here, we aim at determining whether, once introduced, plants assimilate into native communities, or whether they aggregate, thus forming mosaics of native- and alien-rich communities. Alien species may aggregate in their non-native range due to shared habitat preferences, such as their tendency to establish in high-biomass, species-poor areas. Location: 22 herbaceous grasslands in 14 countries, mainly in the temperate zone....

Data from: Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus sclerotia: acquisition of novel alleles from soil populations and uniparental mitochondrial inheritance

Bruce W. Horn, Richard M. Gell, Rakhi Singh, Ronald B. Sorensen & Ignazio Carbone
Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of...

Data from: Climate-based seed transfer of a widespread shrub: population shifts, restoration strategies and the trailing edge

Bryce A. Richardson & Lindsay Chaney
Genetic resources have to be managed appropriately to mitigate the impact of climate change. For many wildland plants, conservation will require knowledge of the climatic factors affecting intraspecific genetic variation to minimize maladaptation. Knowledge of the interaction between traits and climate can focus management resources on vulnerable populations, provide guidance for seed transfer and enhance fitness and resilience under changing climates. In this study, traits of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) were examined among common gardens...

Data from: Deep sequencing of amplicons reveals widespread intraspecific hybridization and multiple origins of polyploidy in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Bryce A. Richardson, Justin T. Page, Prabin Bajgain, Stewart C. Sanderson & Joshua A. Udall
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Hybridization has played an important role in the evolution and ecological adaptation in diploid and polyploid plants. Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) tetraploids are extremely widespread and of great ecological importance. These tetraploids are often taxonomically identified as A. tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, or as autotetraploids of diploid subspecies tridentata and vaseyana. Few details are available as to how these tetraploids are formed or how they are related to diploid subspecies. METHODS: We used...

Data from: Non-native insects dominate daytime pollination in a high-elevation Hawaiian dryland ecosystem

Clare E. Aslan, Aaron B. Shiels, William Haines & Christina T. Liang
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Over one-third of the native flowering plant species in the Hawaiian Islands are listed as federally Threatened or Endangered. Lack of sufficient pollination could contribute to reductions in populations, reproduction, and genetic diversity among these species, but has been little studied. METHODS: We used systematic observations and manual flower treatments to quantify flower visitation and outcrossing dependency of eight native (including four Endangered) plant species in a dryland ecosystem in Hawaii:...

Data from: Genetic variation and differentiation of extant bison (Bison bison) subspecies and cattle (Bos taurus) breeds and subspecies

Matthew A. Cronin, Michael D. MacNeil, Ninh Vu, Vicki Leesburg, Harvey D. Blackburn & James N. Derr
The genetic relationship of American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and wood bison (B. b. athabascae) was quantified and compared with that among breeds and subspecies of cattle. Plains bison from nine herds (N=136), wood bison from three herds (N=65), taurine cattle (Bos taurus taurus) from fourteen breeds (N=244), and indicine cattle (B. t. indicus) from two breeds (N=53) were genotyped for 29 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Bayesian cluster analyses indicate three groups, two of which...

Data from: Climate drives adaptive genetic responses associated with survival in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Lindsay Chaney, Bryce A. Richardson & Matthew J. Germino
A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation for survival in Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush). Artemisia tridentata is a widespread and foundational shrub species in western North America. This species has become extremely fragmented, to the detriment of dependent wildlife, and efforts to restore it are now a land management priority. Common garden experiments were established at three sites with seedlings from 55 source-populations. Populations included each of the three predominant subspecies, and cytotype...

Data from: The relationship between variable host grouping and functional responses among parasitoids of Antispila nysaefoliella (Lepidoptera: Heliozelidae)

Candace Low, Sonja J. Scheffer, Matthew L. Lewis & Michael W. Gates
Our study investigated the importance of variability in the parasitoid community as a source of selection on host group size using a field population of the tupelo leafminer, Antispila nysaefoliella Clemens, which specializes on tupelo, Nyssa sylvatica Marsh. Larvae were collected from leaves with variable numbers of larvae and screened for parasitism using polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I using markers designed specifically for amplifying parasitoid DNA while excluding host DNA. This method...

Data from: Demographic and spatiotemporal patterns of avian influenza infection at the continental scale, and in relation to annual life cycle of a migratory host

Rodolfo Nallar, Zsuzsanna Papp, Tasha Epp, Frederick A. Leighton, Seth R. Swafford, Thomas J. DeLiberto, Robert J. Dusek, Hon S. Ip, Jeffrey Hall, Johannes Berhane, Samantha E. J. Gibbs, Catherine Soos & Yohannes Berhane
Since the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in the eastern hemisphere, numerous surveillance programs and studies have been undertaken to detect the occurrence, distribution, or spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in wild bird populations worldwide. To identify demographic determinants and spatiotemporal patterns of AIV infection in long distance migratory waterfowl in North America, we fitted generalized linear models with binominal distribution to analyze results from 13,574 blue-winged teal (Anas discors, BWTE)...

Data from: Seasonality of soil moisture mediates responses of ecosystem phenology to elevated CO2 and warming in a semi-arid grassland

Tamara J. Zelikova, David G. Williams, Rhonda Hoenigman, Dana M. Blumenthal, Jack A. Morgan & Elise Pendall
Vegetation greenness, detected using digital photography, is useful for monitoring phenology of plant growth, carbon uptake, and water loss at the ecosystem level. Assessing ecosystem phenology by greenness is especially useful in spatially extensive, water-limited ecosystems such as the grasslands of the western United States, where productivity is moisture dependent and may become increasingly vulnerable to future climate change. We used repeat photography and a novel means of quantifying greenness in digital photographs to assess...

Data from: Detecting an elusive invasive species: a diagnostic PCR to detect Burmese python in Florida waters and an assessment of persistence of environmental DNA

Antoinette J. Piaggio, Richard M. Engeman, Matthew W. Hopken, John S. Humphrey, Kandy L. Keacher, William E. Bruce & Michael L. Avery
Recent studies have demonstrated that detection of environmental DNA (eDNA) from aquatic vertebrates in water bodies is possible. The Burmese python, Python bivittatus, is a semi-aquatic, invasive species in Florida where its elusive nature and cryptic coloration make its detection difficult. Our goal was to develop a diagnostic PCR to detect P. bivittatus from water-borne eDNA, which could assist managers in monitoring this invasive species. First, we used captive P. bivittatus to determine whether reptilian...

Data from: Transpacific coalescent pathways of coconut rhinoceros beetle biotypes: resistance to biological control catalyzes resurgence of an old pest

Jonathan Bradley Reil, Camiel Doorenweerd, Michael San Jose, Sheina B. Sim, Scott M. Geib & Daniel Rubinoff
Biological control agents have several advantages over chemical control for pest management, including the capability to restore ecosystem balance with minimal non-target effects and a lower propensity for targets to develop resistance. These factors are particularly important in the invasive species control. The coconut rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros Linnaeus) is a major palm pest that invaded many Pacific islands in the early 20th century through human-mediated dispersal. Application of the Oryctes nudivirus in the 1960’s...

Data from: Forest disturbance accelerates thermophilization of understory plant communities

Jens T. Stevens, Hugh D. Safford, Susan Harrison & Andrew M. Latimer
1. Climate change is likely to shift plant communities towards species from warmer regions, a process termed “thermophilization.” In forests, canopy disturbances such as fire may hasten this process by increasing temperature and moisture stress in the understory, yet little is known about the mechanisms that might drive such shifts, or the consequences of these processes for plant diversity. 2. We sampled understory vegetation across a gradient of disturbance severity from a large-scale natural experiment...

Data from: Genetic variation in adaptive traits and seed transfer zones for Pseudoroegneria spicata (bluebunch wheatgrass) in the northwestern United States

John Bradley St. Clair, Francis F. Kilkenny, Richard C. Johnson, Nancy L. Shaw & George Weaver
A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation in adaptive traits in Pseudoroegneria spicata, a key restoration grass, in the intermountain western United States. Common garden experiments were established at three contrasting sites with seedlings from two maternal parents from each of 114 populations along with five commercial releases commonly used in restoration. Traits associated with size, flowering phenology and leaf width varied considerably among populations and were moderately correlated to the climates of...

Data from: Linking native and invader traits explains native spider population responses to plant invasion

Jennifer Smith, Douglas Emlen, Dean Pearson, Jennifer N. Smith, Douglas J. Emlen & Dean E. Pearson
Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) stems to determine if native spiders’ web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to structural changes arising from C. stoebe invasion. After two years, irregular web-spiders were >30 times more abundant and orb weavers were >23 times more abundant on simulated invasion...

Data from: Colonization of the Mediterranean Basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story

Stephanie Jacquet, Claire Garros, Eric Lombaert, Catherine Walton, Johana Restrepo, Xavier Allene, Thierry Baldet, Catherine Cetre-Sossah, Alexandra Chaskopoulou, Jean-Claude Delecolle, Amelie Desvars, Mouloud Djerbal, Moussa Fall, Laetitia Gardes, Michel De Garine-Wichatitsky, Maria Goffredo, Yuval Gottlieb, Assane Gueye Fall, Muo Kasina, Karien Labuschagne, Youssef Lhor, Javier Lucientes, Thibaud Martin, Bruno Mathieu, Miguel Miranda … & J.-C. Delecolle
Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The biting midge Culicoides imicola is a major vector of orbiviruses to livestock. Historically, the distribution of this species was limited to the Afrotropical region. Entomological surveys first revealed the presence of C. imicola in...

Data from: Hotspot mutations and ColE1 plasmids contribute to the fitness of Salmonella Heidelberg in poultry litter

Adelumola Oladeinde, Kimberly Cook, Alex Orlek, Greg Zock, Kyler Herrington, Nelson Cox, Jodie Plumblee Lawrence & Carolina Hall
Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is a clinically-important serovar linked to food-borne illness, and commonly isolated from poultry. Investigations of a large, multistate outbreak in the USA in 2013 identified poultry litter (PL) as an important extra-intestinal environment that may have selected for specific S. Heidelberg strains. Poultry litter is a mixture of bedding materials and chicken excreta that contains chicken gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, undigested feed, feathers, and other materials of chicken...

Data from: Contrasting fine-root production, survival and soil CO2 efflux in pine and poplar plantations

M. D. Coleman, Richard E. Dickson & Jud G. Isebrands
Tree root activity, including fine-root production, turnover and metabolic activity are significant components of forest productivity and nutrient cycling. Differences in root activity among forest types are not well known. A 3-year study was undertaken in red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) and hybrid poplar (Populus tristis X P. balsamifera cv `Tristis no. 1') plantations to compare belowground root dynamics. We measured fine-root production, mortality and standing crop, as well as soil CO2 efflux. Pine fine-root...

Data from: Life in interstitial space: biocrusts inhibit exotic but not native plant establishment in semi-arid grasslands

Mandy L. Slate, Ragan M. Callaway & Dean E. Pearson
1. Exotic plant species commonly exploit disturbances more successfully than native plants. This outcome is widely attributed to the fact that disturbance reduces biotic resistance from native plant competitors. However, biocrusts, communities of mosses, lichens and microorganisms, are a prominent component of semi-arid grasslands occurring in the interstitial spaces between vascular plants. Biocrusts may provide an important source of biotic resistance to invaders, different from native plant competition, but poorly understood. 2. We established a...

Data from: Applying landscape genomic tools to forest management and restoration of Hawaiian koa (Acacia koa) in a changing environment

Paul F. Gugger, Christina T. Liang, Victoria L. Sork, Paul Hodgskiss & Jessica W. Wright
Identifying and quantifying the importance of environmental variables in structuring population genetic variation can help inform management decisions for conservation, restoration, or reforestation purposes, both in current and future environmental conditions. Landscape genomics offers a powerful approach for understanding the environmental factors that currently associate with genetic variation, and given those associations, where populations may be most vulnerable under future environmental change. Here, we applied genotyping by sequencing to generate over 11,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from...

Data from: A phylogenomic analysis of Marek's disease virus (MDV) reveals independent paths to virulence in Eurasia and North America

Jakob Trimpert, Nicole Groenke, Maria Jenckel, Shulin He, Dusan Kunec, Moriah L. Szpara, Stephen J. Spatz, Nikolaus Osterrieder & Dino P. McMahon
Virulence determines the impact a pathogen has on the fitness of its host, yet current understanding of the evolutionary origins and causes of virulence of many pathogens is surprisingly incomplete. Here, we explore the evolution of Marek's disease virus (MDV), a herpesvirus commonly afflicting chickens and rarely other avian species. The history of MDV in the 20th century represents an important case study in the evolution of virulence. The severity of MDV infection in chickens...

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