36 Works

Data from: Climate, demography, and zoogeography predict introgression thresholds in Salmonid hybrid zones in Rocky Mountain streams

Michael K. Young, Daniel J. Isaak, Kevin S. McKelvey, Taylor M. Wilcox, Daniel M. Bingham, Kristine L. Pilgrim, Kellie J. Carim, Matthew R. Campbell, Matthew P. Corsi, Dona E. Horan, David L. Nagel, Michael K. Schwartz, Dona L. Horan & David E. Nagel
Among the many threats posed by invasions of nonnative species is introgressive hybridization, which can lead to the genomic extinction of native taxa. This phenomenon is regarded as common and perhaps inevitable among native cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout in western North America, despite that these taxa naturally co-occur in some locations. We conducted a synthetic analysis of 13,315 genotyped fish from 558 sites by building logistic regression models using data from geospatial stream...

Data from: Tracking global change using lichen diversity: towards a global-scale ecological indicator

Paula Matos, Linda Geiser, Amanda Hardman, Doug Glavich, Pedro Pinho, Alice Nunes, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares, Cristina Branquinho & Amadeu M.V.M. Soares
Lichens have been used to efficiently track major drivers of global change from the local to regional scale since the beginning of the industrial revolution (sulphur dioxide) to the present (nitrogen deposition and climate change). Currently, the challenge is to universalize monitoring methodologies to compare global change drivers’ simultaneous and independent effects on ecosystems and to assess the efficacy of mitigation measures. Because two protocols are now used at a continental scale North America (US)...

Data from: Inferring invasive species abundance using removal data from management actions

Amy J. Davis, Mevin B. Hooten, Ryan S. Miller, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Jesse Lewis, Michael Moxcey & Kim M. Pepin
Evaluation of the progress of management programs for invasive species is crucial for demonstrating impacts to stakeholders and strategic planning of resource allocation. Estimates of abundance before and after management activities can serve as a useful metric of population management programs. However, many methods of estimating population size are too labor intensive and costly to implement, posing restrictive levels of burden on operational programs. Removal models are a reliable method for estimating abundance before and...

Data from: Studying long-term, large-scale grassland restoration outcomes to improve seeding methods and reveal knowledge gaps

Matthew J. Rinella, Erin K. Espeland & Bruce J. Moffatt
Studies are increasingly investigating effects of large-scale management activities on grassland restoration outcomes. These studies are providing useful comparisons among currently used management strategies, but not the novel strategies needed to rapidly improve restoration efforts. Here we illustrate how managing restoration projects adaptively can allow promising management innovations to be identified and tested. We studied 327 Great Plains fields seeded after coal mining. We modelled plant responses to management strategies to identify the most effective...

Data from: Minimally invasive collection of adipose tissue facilitates the study of eco-physiology in small-bodied mammals

Jeff Clerc, Theodore J. Weller, Jeffrey B. Schineller & Joseph M. Szewczak
Adipose tissue is the primary fuel storage for vertebrates and is an important component of energy budgets during periods of peak energetic demands. Investigating the composition of adipose tissue can provide information about energetics, migration, reproduction and other life-history traits. Until now, most field methods for sampling adipose tissue of small-bodied vertebrates have been destructive. Therefore, investigations of adipose tissue in small-bodied vertebrates have been limited in their broadscale application. We developed a field-ready micro-adipose...

Data from: Machine learning for characterization of insect vector feeding

Denis S. Willett, Justin George, Nora S. Willett, Lukasz L. Stelinski & Stephen L. Lapointe
Insects that feed by ingesting plant and animal fluids cause devastating damage to humans, livestock, and agriculture worldwide, primarily by transmitting pathogens of plants and animals. The feeding processes required for successful pathogen transmission by sucking insects can be recorded by monitoring voltage changes across an insect-food source feeding circuit. The output from such monitoring has traditionally been examined manually, a slow and onerous process. We taught a computer program to automatically classify previously described...

Data from: Pyrodiversity promotes avian diversity over the decade following forest fire

Morgan W. Tingley, Viviana Ruiz-Gutierrez, Robert L. Wilkerson, Christine A. Howell & Rodney B. Siegel
An emerging hypothesis in fire ecology is that pyrodiversity increases species diversity. We test whether pyrodiversity—defined as the standard deviation of fire severity—increases avian biodiversity at two spatial scales, and whether and how this relationship may change in the decade following fire. We use a dynamic Bayesian community model applied to a multi-year dataset of bird surveys at 1106 points sampled across 97 fires in montane California. Our results provide strong support for a positive...

Data from: Density-dependent vulnerability of forest ecosystems to drought

Alessandra Bottero, Anthony W. D'Amato, Brian J. Palik, John B. Bradford, Shawn Fraver, Michael A. Battaglia, Lance A. Asherin & Mike A. Battaglia
Climate models predict increasing drought intensity and frequency for many regions, which may have negative consequences for tree recruitment, growth, and mortality, as well as forest ecosystem services. Furthermore, practical strategies for minimizing vulnerability to drought are limited. Tree population density, a metric of tree abundance in a given area, is a primary driver of competitive intensity among trees, which influences tree growth and mortality. Manipulating tree population density may be a mechanism for moderating...

Data from: Reduced mycorrhizal responsiveness leads to increased competitive tolerance in an invasive exotic plant

Lauren P. Waller, Ragan M. Callaway, John N. Klironomos, Yvette K. Ortega & John L. Maron
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can exert a powerful influence on the outcome of plant–plant competition. Since some exotic plants interact differently with soil biota such as AM fungi in their new range, range-based shifts in AM responsiveness could shift competitive interactions between exotic and resident plants, although this remains poorly studied. We explored whether genotypes of the annual exotic Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle), collected from populations across the native and non-native ranges, differed in responsiveness...

Data from: Climate drives adaptive genetic responses associated with survival in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Lindsay Chaney, Bryce A. Richardson & Matthew J. Germino
A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation for survival in Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush). Artemisia tridentata is a widespread and foundational shrub species in western North America. This species has become extremely fragmented, to the detriment of dependent wildlife, and efforts to restore it are now a land management priority. Common garden experiments were established at three sites with seedlings from 55 source-populations. Populations included each of the three predominant subspecies, and cytotype...

Data from: Linking native and invader traits explains native spider population responses to plant invasion

Jennifer Smith, Douglas Emlen, Dean Pearson, Jennifer N. Smith, Douglas J. Emlen & Dean E. Pearson
Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) stems to determine if native spiders’ web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to structural changes arising from C. stoebe invasion. After two years, irregular web-spiders were >30 times more abundant and orb weavers were >23 times more abundant on simulated invasion...

Data from: Ecosystem carbon density and allocation across a chronosequence of longleaf pine forests

Lisa J. Samuelson, Thomas A. Stokes, John R. Butnor, Kurt H. Johnsen, Carlos A. Gonzalez-Benecke, Timothy A. Martin, , Pete H. Anderson, Michael R. Ramirez, John C. Lewis & Wendell P. Cropper
Forests can partially offset greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to climate change mitigation, mainly through increases in live biomass. We quantified carbon (C) density in 20 managed longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests ranging in age from five to 118 years located across the southeastern USA and estimated above and belowground C trajectories. Ecosystem C stock (all pools including soil C) and aboveground live tree C increased nonlinearly with stand age and the modeled asymptotic...

Data from: Origins of food crops connect countries worldwide

Colin K. Khoury, Harold A. Achicanoy, Anne D. Bjorkman, Carlos Navarro-Racines, Luigi Guarino, Ximena Flores-Palacios, Johannes M. M. Engels, John H. Wiersema, Hannes Dempewolf, Steven Sotelo, Julian Ramírez-Villegas, Nora P. Castañeda Álvarez, Cary Fowler, Andy Jarvis, Loren H. Rieseberg & Paul C. Struik
Research into the origins of food plants has led to the recognition that specific geographical regions around the world have been of particular importance to the development of agricultural crops. Yet the relative contributions of these different regions in the context of current food systems have not been quantified. Here we determine the origins (‘primary regions of diversity’) of the crops comprising the food supplies and agricultural production of countries worldwide. We estimate the degree...

Data from: A cross-continental comparison of plant and beetle responses to retention of forest patches during timber harvest

Susan C. Baker, Charles B. Halpern, Timothy J. Wardlaw, Christel Kern, Graham J. Edgar, Russell J. Thomson, Richard E. Bigley, Jerry F. Franklin, Kamal J.K. Gandhi, Lena Gustafsson, Samuel Johnson, Brian J. Palik, Thomas A. Spies, E. Ashley Steel, Jan Weslien, Joachim Strengbom & Kamal J. K. Gandhi
Timber harvest can adversely affect forest biota. Recent research and application suggest that retention of mature forest elements (‘retention forestry’), including unharvested patches (or ‘aggregates’) within larger harvested units, can benefit biodiversity compared to clearcutting. However, it is unclear whether these benefits can be generalized among the diverse taxa and biomes in which retention forestry is practiced. Lack of comparability in methods for sampling and analysing responses to timber harvest and edge creation presents a...

Data from: The genome of the yellow potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis reveals insights into the basis of parasitism and virulence

Sebastian Eves-Van Den Akker, Dominik Laetsch, Peter Thorpe, Catherine Lilley, Etienne Danchin, Martine Da Rocha, Corinne Rancurel, Nancy Holroyd, James Cotton, Amir Szitenberg, Eric Grenier, Josselin Montarry, Benjamin Mimee, Marc-Olivier Duceppe, Ian Boyes, Jessica Marvin, Laura Jones, Hazijah Yusup, Joël Lafond-Lapalme, Magali Esquibet, Michael Sabeh, Michael Rott, Hein Overmars, Anna Finkers-Tomczak, Geert Smant … & John Jones
Background: The yellow potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis is a devastating plant pathogen of global economic importance. This biotrophic parasite secretes effectors from pharyngeal glands, some of which were acquired by horizontal gene transfer, to manipulate host processes and promote parasitism. G. rostochiensis is classified into pathotypes with different plant resistance-breaking phenotypes. Results: We generate a high-quality genome assembly for G. rostochiensis pathotype Ro1, identify putative effectors and horizontal gene transfer events, map gene expression...

Data from: Soil aggregate stability and grassland productivity associations in a northern mixed-grass prairie

Kurt O. Reinhart & Lance T. Vermeire
Soil aggregate stability data are often predicted to be positively associated with measures of plant productivity, rangeland health, and ecosystem functioning. Here we revisit the hypothesis that soil aggregate stability is positively associated with plant productivity. We measured local (plot-to-plot) variation in grassland community composition, plant (aboveground) biomass, root biomass, % water-stable soil aggregates, and topography. After accounting for spatial autocorrelation, we observed a negative association between % water-stable soil aggregates (0.25-1 and 1-2 mm...

Data from: Experimental insight into the process of parasite community assembly

Sarah A. Budischak, Eric P. Hoberg, Art Abrams, Anna E. Jolles & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
1.Community assembly is a fundamental process that has long been a central focus in ecology. Extending community assembly theory to communities of co-infecting parasites, we used a gastrointestinal nematode removal experiment in free-ranging African buffalo to examine community assembly patterns and processes. 2.We first asked whether reassembled communities differ from undisturbed communities by comparing anthelmintic-treated and control hosts. Next, we examined the temporal dynamics of assembly using a cross-section of communities that reassembled for different...

Data from: Thresholds and gradients in a semi-arid grassland: long-term grazing treatments induce slow, continuous and reversible vegetation change

Lauren M. Porensky, Kevin E. Mueller, David J. Augustine & Justin D. Derner
1. Temporal changes in semi-arid ecosystems can include transitions between alternative stable states, involving thresholds and multiple domains of attraction, but can also include relatively continuous, symmetric and reversible shifts within a single stable state. Conceptual state-and-transition models (STMs) describe both types of ecosystem dynamics by including state transitions (plant community changes difficult-to-reverse without substantial input or effort) and phase shifts (easily reversible community changes) as consequences of management practices and environmental variability. Grazing management...

Data from: Phylogeny of xerophilic aspergilli (subgenus Aspergillus) and taxonomic revision of section Restricti

František Sklenář, Željko Jurjević, Polona Zalar, J. C. Frisvad, Cobus M. Visagie, Miroslav Kolařík, Jos Houbraken, Amanda J. Chen, Neriman Yilmaz, Keith A. Seifert, Monica Coton, Franck Déniel, Nina Gunde-Cimerman, Robert A. Samson, Stephen W. Peterson & Vít Hubka
Aspergillus section Restricti together with sister sect. Aspergillus (formerly Eurotium) comprises osmophilic species, that are able to grow on substrates with low water activity and in extreme environments. We adressed the monophyly of both sections within subgenus Aspergillus and applied a multidisciplinary approach for definition of species boundaries in sect. Restricti. The monophyly of sections Aspergillus and Restricti was tested on a set of 102 taxa comprising all currently accepted species and was strongly supported...

Data from: The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

Nicola S. Lewis, Colin A. Russell, Tavis K. Anderson, Kathryn Berger, David F. Burke, Judith M. Fonville, Ronald A.M. Fouchier, Paul Kellam, Bjorn F. Koel, Tung Nguyen, Bundit Nuansrichy, J. S. Malik Peiris, Takehiko Saito, Gaelle Simon, Eugene Skepner, Nobuhiro Takemae, ESNIP3 Consortium, Richard J. Webby, Kristien Van Reeth, Sharon M. Brookes, Lars Larsen, Ian H. Brown, Amy L. Vincent, Pinky Langat, Filip Bielejec … & JS Malik Peiris
Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the...

Data from: Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities

Chengjin Chu, Andrew R. Kleinhesselink, Kris M. Havstad, Mitchel P. McClaran, Debra P. Peters, Lance T. Vermeire, Haiyan Wei & Peter B. Adler
Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak...

Data from: Origins of cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, elucidated from genome-wide SNP genotypes

Jared E. Decker, Jeremy F. Taylor, Leeson J. Alexander, Juha Kantanen, Ann Millbrooke, Robert D. Schnabel & Michael D. MacNeil
Feral livestock may harbor genetic variation of commercial, scientific, historical or esthetic value. The origins and uniqueness of feral cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, are uncertain. The island is now part of the Alaska Maritime Wildlife Refuge and Federal wildlife managers want grazing to cease, presumably leading to demise of the cattle. Here we characterize the cattle of Chirikof Island relative to extant breeds and discern their origins. Our analyses support the inference that Yakut...

Data from: Mediating water temperature increases due to livestock and global change in high elevation meadow streams of the Golden Trout Wilderness

Sébastien Nusslé, Kathleen R. Matthews & Stephanie M. Carlson
Rising temperatures due to climate change are pushing the thermal limits of many species, but how climate warming interacts with other anthropogenic disturbances such as land use remains poorly understood. To understand the interactive effects of climate warming and livestock grazing on water temperature in three high elevation meadow streams in the Golden Trout Wilderness, California, we measured riparian vegetation and monitored water temperature in three meadow streams between 2008 and 2013, including two “resting”...

Data from: Geosmithia associated with bark beetles and woodborers in the western USA: taxonomic diversity and vector specificity

Miroslav Kolařík, Steven J. Seybold, Ned Tisserat, Wilhelm De Beer, David M. Rizzo, Jiri Hulcr & Martin Kostovčík
Fungi in the genus Geosmithia (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) are frequent associates of bark beetles and woodborers that colonize hardwood and coniferous trees. One species, Geosmithia morbida, is an economically damaging invasive species. The authors surveyed the Geosmithia species of California and Colorado, USA, to (i) provide baseline data on taxonomy of Geosmithia and beetle vector specificity across the western USA; (ii) investigate the subcortical beetle fauna for alternative vectors of the invasive G. morbida; and (iii)...

Data from: Evaluating carbon storage, timber harvest, and habitat possibilities for a western Cascades (US) forest landscape

Jeffrey Kline, Mark Harmon, Thomas Spies, Anita Morzillo, Robert Pabst, Brenda McComb, Frank Schnekenburger, Keith Olsen, Blair Csuti, Jody Vogeler, Jeffrey D. Kline, Thomas A. Spies, Brenda C. McComb, Anita T. Morzillo, Mark E. Harmon, Robert J. Pabst, Keith A. Olsen & Jody C. Vogeler
Forest policymakers and managers have long sought ways to evaluate the capability of forest landscapes to jointly produce timber, habitat, and other ecosystem services in response to forest management. Currently, carbon is of particular interest as policies for increasing carbon storage on federal lands are being proposed. However, a challenge in joint production analysis of forest management is adequately representing ecological conditions and processes that influence joint production relationships. We used simulation models of vegetation...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    36

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    36

Affiliations

  • United States Department of Agriculture
    36
  • University of Montana
    3
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of Vermont
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • Northern Research Station
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • University of Florida
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2