21 Works

Data from: Chemical communication, sexual selection, and introgression in wall lizards

Hannah Elizabeth Alexandra MacGregor, Rachel Alison Margaret Lewandowsky, Patrizia D'Ettorre, Chloé Leroy, Noel W. Davies, Geoffrey M. While & Tobias Uller
Divergence in communication systems should influence the likelihood that individuals from different lineages interbreed, and consequently shape the direction and rate of hybridization. Here, we studied the role of chemical communication in hybridization, and its contribution to asymmetric and sexually selected introgression, between two lineages of the common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis). Males of the two lineages differed in the chemical composition of their femoral secretions. Chemical profiles provided information regarding male secondary sexual characters,...

Data from: Relating trophic resources to community structure: a predictive index of food availability

Valerio Zupo, Timothy J. Alexander & Graham J. Edgar
The abundance and the distribution of trophic resources available for consumers influence the productivity and the diversity of natural communities. Nevertheless, assessment of the actual abundance of food items available for individual trophic groups has been constrained by differences in methods and metrics used by various authors. Here we develop an index of food abundance, the framework of which can be adapted for different ecosystems. The relative available food index (RAFI) is computed by considering...

Data from: Genetic monitoring of open ocean biodiversity: an evaluation of DNA metabarcoding for processing continuous plankton recorder samples

Bruce E. Deagle, Laurence J. Clarke, John A. Kitchener, Andrea M. Polanowski & Andrew T. Davidson
DNA metabarcoding is an efficient method for measuring biodiversity, but the process of initiating long-term DNA-based monitoring programs, or integrating with conventional programs, is only starting. In marine ecosystems, plankton surveys using the continuous plankton recorder (CPR) have characterised biodiversity along transects covering millions of kilometres with time-series spanning decades. We investigated the potential for use of metabarcoding in CPR surveys. Samples (n= 53) were collected in two Southern Ocean transects and metazoans identified using...

Data from: Temporal genetic patterns of diversity and structure evidence sweepstakes in reproductive success of a spiny lobster

Cecilia Villacorta-Rath, Carla A. Souza, Nicholas P. Murphy, Bridget S. Green, Caleb Gardner & Jan M. Strugnell
Population structure of many marine organisms is spatially patchy and varies within and between years, a phenomenon defined as chaotic genetic patchiness. This results from the combination of planktonic larval dispersal and environmental stochasticity. Additionally, in species with bi-partite life, post-settlement selection can magnify these genetic differences. The high fecundity (up to 500,000 eggs annually) and protracted larval duration (12-24 months) and dispersal of the southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, make it a good test...

Data from: Comparison of reproductive investment in native and non-native populations of common wall lizards reveals sex differences in adaptive potential.

Hannah E.A. MacGregor, Geoffrey M. While, Tobias Uller & Hannah E. A. MacGregor
Non-native animals can encounter very different environments than those they are adapted to. Functional changes in morphology, physiology and life-history following introduction show that organisms can adapt both fast and efficiently. It remains unclear, however, if female reproductive characters and male sexually selected behaviour show the same adaptive potential. Furthermore, the invasion success and evolutionary trajectory of non-native species might often depend on the ability of the sexes to coordinate shifts in characters associated with...

Data from: Efficiency of ddRAD target enriched sequencing across spiny rock lobster species (Palinuridae: Jasus)

Carla A. Souza, Nicholas Murphy, Cecilia Villacorta-Rath, Laura N. Woodings, Irina Ilyushkina, Cristian E. Hernandez, Bridget S. Green, James J. Bell & Jan M. Strugnell
Double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) and target capture sequencing methods are used to explore population and phylogenetic questions in non-model organisms. ddRADseq offers a simple and reliable protocol for population genomic studies, however it can result in a large amount of missing data due to allelic dropout. Target capture sequencing offers an opportunity to increase sequencing coverage with little missing data and consistent orthologous loci across samples, although this approach has generally been...

Data from: Density trends and demographic signals uncover the long-term impact of transmissible cancer in Tasmanian Devils

Billie T. Lazenby, Mathias W. Tobler, William E. Brown, Clare E. Hawkins, Greg J. Hocking, Fiona Hume, Stewart Huxtable, Philip Iles, Menna E. Jones, Clare Lawrence, Sam Thalmann, Phil Wise, Howel Williams, Samantha Fox & David Pemberton
Monitoring the response of wild mammal populations to threatening processes is fundamental to effective conservation management. This is especially true for infectious diseases, which may have dynamic and therefore unpredictable interactions with their host. We investigate the long-term impact of a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), on the endemic Tasmanian devil. We analyse trends in devil spotlight counts and density across the area impacted by the disease. We investigate the demographic parameters which...

Data from: Environmental variation is a major predictor of global trait turnover in mammals

Ben G. Holt, Gabriel C. Costa, Caterina Penone, Jean-Philippe Lessard, Thomas M. Brooks, Ana D. Davidson, S. Blair Hedges, Volker C. Radeloff, Carsten Rahbek, Carlo Rondinini & Catherine H. Graham
Aim: To evaluate how environment and evolutionary history interact to influence global patterns of mammal trait diversity (a combination of 14 morphological and life-history traits). Location: The global terrestrial environment. Taxon: Terrestrial mammals. Methods: We calculated patterns of spatial turnover for mammalian traits and phylogenetic lineages using the mean nearest taxon distance. We then used a variance partitioning approach to establish the relative contribution of trait conservatism, ecological adaptation and clade specific ecological preferences on...

Data from: Infection of the fittest: devil facial tumour disease has greatest effect on individuals with highest reproductive output

Konstans Wells, Rodrigo K. Hamede, Douglas H. Kerlin, Andrew Storfer, Paul A. Hohenlohe, Menna E. Jones & Hamish I. McCallum
Emerging infectious diseases rarely affect all members of a population equally and determining how individuals’ susceptibility to infection is related to other components of their fitness is critical to understanding disease impacts at a population level and for predicting evolutionary trajectories. We introduce a novel state-space model framework to investigate survival and fecundity of Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) affected by a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumour disease. We show that those devils that become host...

Data from: Evolution of ischemic damage and behavioural deficit over 6 months after MCAo in the rat: selecting the optimal outcomes and statistical power for multi-centre preclinical trials

Sarah S. J. Rewell, Leonid Churilov, T. Kate Sidon, Elena Aleksoska, Susan F. Cox, Malcolm Robert Macleod & David W. Howells
Key disparities between the timing and methods of assessment in animal stroke studies and clinical trial may be part of the reason for the failure to translate promising findings. This study investigates the development of ischemic damage after thread occlusion MCAo in the rat, using histological and behavioural outcomes. Using the adhesive removal test we investigate the longevity of behavioural deficit after ischemic stroke in rats, and examine the practicality of using such measures as...

Data from: Climate and sex ratio variation in a viviparous lizard

George D. Cunningham, Geoff M. While, Erik Wapstra & Geoffrey M. While
The extent to which key biological processes, such as sex determination, respond to environmental fluctuations is fundamental for assessing species' susceptibility to ongoing climate change. Few studies, however, address how climate affects offspring sex in the wild. We monitored two climatically distinct populations of the viviparous skink Niveoscincus ocellatus for 16 years, recording environmental temperatures, offspring sex and date of birth. We found strong population-specific effects of temperature on offspring sex, with female offspring more...

Data from: Experimental manipulation suggests effect of polyandry but not mate familiarity on within-pair aggression in the social skink, Liopholis whitii

Thomas Botterill-James, Jacinta Silince, Tobias Uller, David G. Chapple, Michael G. Gardner, Erik Wapstra, Geoffrey M. While & Jacinta Sillince
Long-term monogamy is a key characteristic of family living across animals. The evolutionary maintenance of long-term monogamy has been suggested to be facilitated by increased reproductive coordination as a result of mate familiarity, leading to increased reproductive success. However, such effects can be compromised if females mate outside the pair bond (e.g. female polyandry), introducing conflicts of interest between the male and female. Here, we experimentally test the effects of both mate familiarity and female...

Data from: The large-scale drivers of population declines in a long-distance migratory shorebird

Nicholas J. Murray, Peter P. Marra, Richard A. Fuller, Robert S. Clemens, Kiran Dhanjal-Adams, Ken B. Gosbell, Chris J. Hassell, Takuya Iwamura, David Melville, Clive D. T. Minton, Adrian C. Riegen, Danny I. Rogers, Eric J. Woehler & Colin E. Studds
Migratory species can travel tens of thousands of kilometers each year, spending different parts of their annual cycle in geographically distinct locations. Understanding the drivers of population change is vital for conserving migratory species, yet the challenge of collecting data over entire geographic ranges has hindered attempts to identify the processes leading to observed population changes. Here, we use remotely sensed environmental data and count data to investigate the factors driving variability in abundance in...

Data from: Intrinsic factors drive spatial genetic variation in a highly vagile species, the wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax), in Tasmania

Christopher P. Kozakiewicz, Scott Carver, Jeremy J. Austin, Jill M. Shephard & Christopher P. Burridge
Knowledge of dispersal in a species, both its quantity and the factors influencing it, are crucial for our understanding of ecology and evolution, and for species conservation. Here we quantified and formally assessed the potential contribution of extrinsic factors on individual dispersal in the threatened Tasmanian population of wedge-tailed eagle, Aquila audax. As successful breeding by these individuals appears strongly related to habitat, we tested the effect of landscape around sampling sites on genetic diversity...

Data from: Seasonal shifts along the oviparity-viviparity continuum in a cold-climate lizard population

Richard Shine, Erik Wapstra & Mats Olsson
Because squamate embryos require weeks of high temperature to complete development, cool climatic areas are dominated by viviparous taxa (in which gravid females can sun-bask to keep embryos warm) rather than oviparous taxa (which rely on warm soil to incubate their eggs). How, then, can some oviparous taxa reproduce successfully in cool climates – especially late in summer, when soil temperatures are falling? Near the northern limit of their distribution (in Sweden), sand lizards (Lacerta...

Data from: Urban landscapes can change virus gene flow and evolution in a fragmentation-sensitive carnivore

Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Meggan E. Craft, W. Chris Funk, Chris Kozakiewicz, Daryl R. Trumbo, Erin E Boydston, Lisa M. Lyren, Kevin Crooks, Justin S. Lee, Sue VandeWoude & Scott Carver
Urban expansion has widespread impacts on wildlife species globally, including the transmission and emergence of infectious diseases. However, there is almost no information about how urban landscapes shape transmission dynamics in wildlife. Using an innovative phylodynamic approach combining host and pathogen molecular data with landscape characteristics and host traits, we untangle the complex factors that drive transmission networks of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) in bobcats (Lynx rufus). We found that the urban landscape played a...

Data from: Invasive pathogen drives host population collapse: effects of a travelling wave of sarcoptic mange on bare-nosed wombats

Alynn M. Martin, Christopher P. Burridge, Janeane Ingram, Tamieka A. Fraser & Scott Carver
1.Emerging and invasive pathogens can have long-lasting impacts on susceptible wildlife populations, including localised collapse and extirpation. Management of threatening disease is of widespread interest and requires knowledge of spatiotemporal patterns of pathogen spread. 2.Theory suggests disease spread often occurs via two patterns: homogenous mixing and travelling waves. However, high resolution empirical data demonstrating localised (within population) disease spread patterns are rare. 3.This study examined the spread of sarcoptic mange (aetiological agent Sarcoptes scabiei) in...

Data from: Strong trans-Pacific break and local conservation units in the Galapagos shark (Carcharhinus galapagensis) revealed by genome-wide cytonuclear markers

Diana A. Pazmiño, Gregory E. Maes, Madeline E. Green, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Mauricio Hoyos-Padilla, Clinton J.A. Duffy, Carl G. Meyer, Sven E. Kerwath, Pelayo Salinas-De-León & Lynne Van Herwerden
The application of genome-wide cytonuclear molecular data to identify management and adaptive units at various spatio-temporal levels is particularly important for overharvested large predatory organisms, often characterized by smaller, localized populations. Despite being “near threatened”, current understanding of habitat use and population structure of Carcharhinus galapagensis is limited to specific areas within its distribution. We evaluated population structure and connectivity across the Pacific Ocean using genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (~7200 SNPs) and mitochondrial Control Region...

Data from: Plasticity of thermoregulatory behaviour in response to the thermal environment by widespread and alpine reptile species

Amanda J. Caldwell, Geoffrey M. While & Erik Wapstra
Phenotypic plasticity plays a central role in determining how organisms respond to environmental change over short timescales. Despite this, we know little about how phenotypic plasticity varies between populations or species. We tested the extent of plasticity in basking behaviour in low- and high-altitude populations of two widespread lowland and two highland species of a cool-climate lizard genus: Niveoscincus. We found evidence of divergence in basking behaviour between populations and species, with highland species and...

Data from: Trophic position determines functional and phylogenetic recovery after disturbance within a community

Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Gregory J. Jordan, Christopher Burridge, Timothy J. Wardlaw, Thomas P. Baker, Lynette Forster, Morgana Petersfeld, Susan C. Baker, Christopher P. Burridge & Morgana Petersfield
1. The roles that functional traits and/or evolutionary history of species from co-occuring trophic groups have in determining community recovery following disturbance are poorly understood. Functional traits help determine how species interact with their environment, thus functional traits are likely to change with time since logging. However, traits of species may also be phylogenetically constrained depending on their evolutionary history. Because beetles are trophically diverse, the effects of phylogenetic and functional aspects of community recovery...

Data from: Environmental influences and ontogenetic differences in vertical habitat use of black marlin (Istiompax indica) in the southwestern Pacific

Samuel M. Williams, Bonnie J. Holmes, Sean R. Tracey, Julian G. Pepperell, Michael L. Domeier & Michael B. Bennett
The black marlin (Istiompax indica) is a highly migratory billfish that occupies waters throughout the tropical and subtropical Indo-Pacific. To characterize the vertical habitat use of I. indica, we examined the temperature-depth profiles collected using 102 pop-up satellite archival tags deployed off the east coast of Australia. Modelling of environmental variables revealed location, sea-surface height deviation, mixed layer depth and dissolved oxygen to all be significant predictors of vertical habitat use. Distinct differences in diel...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • University of Tasmania
    21
  • Lund University
    3
  • James Cook University
    3
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • La Trobe University
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    1