29 Works

Data from: Outlier SNPs detect weak regional structure against a background of genetic homogeneity in the Eastern Rock Lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi

Laura N. Woodings, Nicholas P. Murphy, Stephen R. Doyle, Nathan E. Hall, Andrew J. Robinson, Geoffrey W. Liggins, Bridget S. Green, Ira R. Cooke, James J. Bell & Jan M. Strugnell
Genetic differentiation is characteristically weak in marine species making assessments of population connectivity and structure difficult. However the advent of genomic methods have increased genetic resolution, enabling studies to detect weak, but significant population differentiation within marine species. With an increasing number of studies employing high resolution genome-wide techniques, we are realising the connectivity of marine populations is often complex and quantifying this complexity can provide an understanding of the processes shaping marine species genetic...

Data from: Conservation of sex-linked markers among conspecific populations of a viviparous skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus, exhibiting genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination

Peta Hill, Christopher P. Burridge, Tariq Ezaz, Erik Wapstra & Peta L Hill
Sex determination systems are exceptionally diverse and have undergone multiple and independent evolutionary transitions among species, particularly reptiles. However, the mechanisms underlying these transitions have not been established. Here we tested for differences in sex-linked markers in the only known reptile that is polymorphic for sex determination system, the spotted snow skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus, to quantify the genomic differences that have accompanied this transition. In a highland population, sex is determined genetically, whilst in a...

Data from: Avian predation intensity as a driver of clinal variation in colour morph frequency

Genevieve Matthews, Celine T. Goulet, Kaspar Delhey, Zak S. Atkins, Geoffrey M. While, Michael G. Gardner & David G. Chapple
1) Phenotypic variation provides the framework for natural selection to work upon, enabling adaptive evolution. One of the most discernible manifestations of phenotypic variability is colour variation. When this variation is discrete, genetically-based colour pattern morphs occur simultaneously within a population. 2) Why and how colour polymorphisms are maintained is an evolutionary puzzle. Several evolutionary drivers have been hypothesized as influencing clinal patterns of morph frequency, with spatial variation in climate and predation being considered...

Data from: Soil fungi underlie a phylogenetic pattern in plant growth responses to nitrogen enrichment

Rachel C. Wooliver, John K. Senior, Brad M. Potts, Michael E. Van Nuland, Joseph K. Bailey & Jennifer A. Schweitzer
1. Under increasing anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition, some plant species will thrive while others will not. Previous work has shown that plant phylogeny can predict these responses, and that interactions with mycorrhizal fungi are a mechanism that drives variation in plant responses to N enrichment. Yet, much of this work has ignored the roles of other root-associated fungi and whole soil fungal communities in driving these responses. 2. We tested whether soil fungi mediate responses...

Data from: Quantifying floristic and structural forest maturity: an attribute-based method for wet eucalypt forests

Laura G. Van Galen, Greg J. Jordan, Robert A. Musk, Nicholas J. Beeton, Timothy J. Wardlaw, Susan C. Baker & Gregory J. Jordan
1. Maintaining developmental heterogeneity of ecological communities within landscapes is crucial for sustainable native forest management. Consequently, methods to assess forest maturity (i.e. the degree to which the forest contains attributes and supports processes characteristic of late-successional forests) are valuable for making management decisions. However, no consistent, pragmatic method to quantify maturity that incorporates multiple ecosystem elements is available for many forest systems, including Australian wet eucalypt forests. 2. We draw upon forest community dynamics...

Data from: Urbanization and anticoagulant poisons promote immune dysfunction in bobcats

Laurel E.K. Serieys, Amanda J. Lea, Marta Epeldegui, Tiffany C. Armenta, Joanne Moriarty, Sue Vandewoude, Scott Carver, Janet Foley, Robert K. Wayne, Seth P.D. Riley, Christel H. Uittenbogaart, Laurel E. K. Serieys & Seth P. D. Riley
Understanding how human activities influence immune response to environmental stressors can support biodiversity conservation across increasingly urbanizing landscapes. We studied a bobcat (Lynx rufus) population in urban southern California that experienced a rapid population decline from 2002–2005 due to notoedric mange. Because anticoagulant rodenticide (AR) exposure was an underlying complication in mange deaths, we aimed to understand sublethal contributions of urbanization and ARs on 65 biochemical markers of immune and organ function. Variance in immunological...

Data from: Top carnivore decline has cascading effects on scavengers and carrion persistence

Calum X. Cunningham, Christopher N. Johnson, Leon A. Barmuta, Tracey Hollings, Eric J. Woehler & Menna E. Jones
Top carnivores have suffered widespread global declines, with well-documented effects on mesopredators and herbivores. We know less about how carnivores affect ecosystems through scavenging. Tasmania’s top carnivore, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), has suffered severe disease-induced population declines, providing a natural experiment on the role of scavenging in structuring communities. Using remote cameras and experimentally-placed carcasses, we show that mesopredators consume more carrion in areas where devils have declined. Carcass consumption by the two native...

Data from: Using an integral projection model to assess the effect of temperature on the growth of gilthead seabream Sparus aurata

Freddie J. Heather, Dylan Z. Childs, Audrey M. Darnaude & Julia L. Blanchard
Accurate information on the growth rates of fish is crucial for fisheries stock assessment and management. Empirical life history parameters (von Bertalanffy growth) are widely fitted to cross-sectional size-at-age data sampled from fish populations. This method often assumes that environmental factors affecting growth remain constant over time. The current study utilized longitudinal life history information contained in otoliths from 412 juveniles and adults of gilthead seabream, Sparus aurata, a commercially important species fished and farmed...

Data from: The diversity of population responses to environmental change

Fernando Colchero, Owen R. Jones, Dalia A. Conde, Dave Hodgson, Felix Zajitschek, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Aurelio F. Malo, Susan C. Alberts, Peter H. Becker, Sandra Bouwhuis, Anne M. Bronikowski, Kristel M. De Vleeschouwer, Richard J. Delahay, Stefan Dummermuth, Eduardo Fernández-Duque, John Frisenvænge, Martin Hesselsøe, Sam Larson, Jean-Francois Lemaitre, Jennifer McDonald, David A.W. Miller, Colin O'Donnell, Craig Packer, Becky E. Raboy, Christopher J. Reading … & Chris J. Reading
The current extinction and climate change crises pressure us to predict population dynamics with ever-greater accuracy. Although predictions rest on the well-advanced theory of age-structured populations, two key issues remain poorly-explored. Specifically, how the age-dependency in demographic rates and the year-to-year interactions between survival and fecundity affect stochastic population growth rates. We use inference, simulations, and mathematical derivations to explore how environmental perturbations determine population growth rates for populations with different age-specific demographic rates and...

Data from: Transmission pathways and spillover of an erythrocytic bacterial pathogen from domestic cats to wild felids

Annie Kellner, Scott Carver, Valeria Scorza, Clifton D. McKee, Michael Lappin, Kevin R. Crooks, Sue VandeWoude & Michael F. Antolin
Many pathogens infect multiple hosts, and spillover from domestic to wild species poses a significant risk for spread of diseases that threaten wildlife and humans. Documentation of cross-species transmission, and unravelling the mechanisms that drive it, remains a challenge. Focusing on co-occurring domestic and wild felids, we evaluate possible transmission mechanisms and evidence of spillover of ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ (CMhm), an erythrocytic bacterial parasite of cats. We examine transmission and possibility of spillover by analysing...

Data from: Maternal presence facilitates plasticity in offspring behavior: insights into the evolution of parental care

Kirke L. Munch, Daniel W.A. Noble, Luke Budd, Aryana Row, Erik Wapstra, Geoffrey M. While & Daniel W A Noble
Fundamental to the definition of parental care is that care confers benefits to the offspring. However, the mechanisms resulting in these benefits remain poorly understood, particularly in species where postnatal care is not obligatory. Here, we address this shortcoming using a lizard, Liopholis whitii, in which family life is facultative and relatively simple – extending to prolonged associations between parents and offspring within the parental territory. Using a split-clutch design, we housed offspring either with...

Data from: Development of 15 nuclear EST microsatellite markers for the palaeoendemic conifer Pherosphaera hookeriana (Podocarpaceae)

James R. P. Worth, James R. Marthick, Maurizio Rossetto, Joel Cohen, Greg Bourke & Gregory J. Jordan
Premise of the study: Nuclear microsatellite markers were developed for population genetic analysis of the threatened palaeoendemic conifer Pherosphaera hookeriana W. Archer (Podocarpaceae). Methods and Results: Fifteen variable loci were identified showing 1 to 13 alleles per population with seven loci displaying over four alleles in all populations and the average number of alleles per locus ranging from 4.8 to 5.93 per population. The observed heterozygosity per locus varied from 0.00 to 0.91 and overall...

Data from: Reliable species distributions are obtainable with sparse, patchy and biased data by leveraging over species and data types

Samantha L. Peel, Nicole A. Hill, Scott D. Foster, Simon J. Wotherspoon, Claudio Ghiglione & Stefano Schiaparelli
1. New methods for species distribution models (SDMs) utilise presence‐absence (PA) data to correct the sampling bias of presence‐only (PO) data in a spatial point process setting. These have been shown to improve species estimates when both data sets are large and dense. However, is a PA data set that is smaller and patchier than hitherto examined able to do the same? Furthermore, when both data sets are relatively small, is there enough information contained...

Data from: Gigapixel big data movies provide cost‐effective seascape scale direct measurements of open‐access coastal human use such as recreational fisheries

David J. H. Flynn, Tim P. Lynch, Neville S. Barrett, Lincoln S. C. Wong, Carlie Devine & David Hughes
Collecting data on unlicensed open‐access coastal activities, such as some types of recreational fishing, has often relied on telephone interviews selected from landline directories. However, this approach is becoming obsolete due to changes in communication technology such as a switch to unlisted mobile phones. Other methods, such as boat ramp interviews, are often impractical due to high labor cost. We trialed an autonomous, ultra‐high‐resolution photosampling method as a cost effect solution for direct measurements of...

Data from: Effects of male telomeres on probability of paternity in sand lizards

Angela Pauliny, Emily Miller, Nicky Rollings, Erik Wapstra, Donald Blomqvist, Christopher Friesen, Mats Olsson & Chris R. Friesen
Standardized swim-up trials are used in IVF clinics to select particularly motile spermatozoa in order to increase the probability of a successful fertilization. Such trials demonstrate that sperm with longer telomeres have higher motility and lower levels of DNA damage. Regardless of whether sperm motility, and successful swim-up to fertilization sites, is a direct or correlational effect of telomere length or DNA damage, covariation between telomere length and sperm performance predicts a relationship between telomere...

Data from: Sex bias in ability to cope with cancer: Tasmanian devils and facial tumour disease.

Manuel Ruiz-Aravena, Menna E. Jones, Scott Carver, Sergio Estay, Camila Espejo, Andrew Storfer & Rodrigo K. Hamede
Knowledge of the ecological dynamics between hosts and pathogens during the initial stages of disease emergence is crucial to understanding the potential for evolution of new interspecific interactions. Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations have declined precipitously owing to infection by a transmissible cancer (devil facial tumour disease, DFTD) that emerged approximately 20 years ago. Since the emergence of DFTD, and as the disease spreads across Tasmania, the number of devil has dropped up to 90%...

Data from: Maternal effects impact decision-making in a viviparous lizard

Kirke L. Munch, Daniel W.A. Noble, Thomas Botterill-James, Iain S. Koolhof, Ben Halliwell, Erik Wapstra, Geoffrey M. While & Daniel W. A. Noble
Stressful conditions experienced during early development can have deleterious effects on offspring morphology, physiology and behaviour. However, few studies have examined how developmental stress influences an individual’s cognitive phenotype. Using a viviparous lizard, we show that the availability of food resources to a mother during gestation influences a key component of her offspring’s cognitive phenotype; their decision-making. Offspring from females who experienced low resource availability during gestation did better in an anti-predatory task that relied...

Data from: Comparative population genomics reveals key barriers to dispersal in Southern Ocean penguins

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Louise Emmerson, Colin Southwell, Barbara Wienecke, Alex D. Rogers, Charles-Andre Bost, Gary D. Miller, Michael J. Polito, Patrick Lelliot, Jonathan Handley, Sarah Crofts, Richard A. Phillips, Michael J. Dunn, Karen J. Miller, Tom Hart & Patrick Lelliott
The mechanisms that determine patterns of species dispersal are important factors in the production and maintenance of biodiversity. Understanding these mechanisms helps to forecast the responses of species to environmental change. Here we used a comparative framework and genome-wide data obtained through RAD-seq to compare the patterns of connectivity among breeding colonies for five penguin species with shared ancestry, overlapping distributions, and differing ecological niches, allowing an examination of the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers governing...

Data from: Drones count wildlife more accurately and precisely than humans

Jarrod C. Hodgson, Rowan Mott, Shane M. Baylis, Trung T. Pham, Simon Wotherspoon, Adam D. Kilpatrick, Ramesh Raja Segaran, Ian Reid, Aleks Terauds & Lian Pin Koh
Knowing how many individuals are in a wildlife population allows informed management decisions to be made. Ecologists are increasingly using technologies, such as remotely piloted aircraft (RPA; commonly known as “drones,” unmanned aerial systems or unmanned aerial vehicles), for wildlife monitoring applications. Although RPA are widely touted as a cost-effective way to collect high-quality wildlife population data, the validity of these claims is unclear. Using life-sized, replica seabird colonies containing a known number of fake...

Data from: Genome-wide expression reveals multiple systemic effects associated with detection of anticoagulant poisons in bobcats (Lynx rufus)

Devaughn Fraser, Alice Mouton, Laurel E.K. Serieys, Steve Cole, Scott Carver, Sue Vandewoude, Michael Lappin, Seth P.D. Riley, Robert Wayne & Laurel E. K. Serieys
Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are indiscriminate toxicants that threaten non-target predatory and scavenger species through secondary poisoning. Accumulating evidence suggests that AR exposure may have disruptive sublethal consequences on individuals that can affect fitness. We evaluated AR-related effects on genome wide expression patterns in a population of bobcats in southern California. We identify differential expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, epithelial integrity, and both adaptive and innate immune function. Further, we...

Data from: Distinguishing between convergent evolution and violation of the molecular clock for three taxa

Jonathan D. Mitchell, Jeremy G. Sumner & Barbara R. Holland
We give a non-technical introduction to convergence-divergence models, a new modeling approach for phylogenetic data that allows for the usual divergence of lineages after lineage-splitting but also allows for taxa to converge, i.e. become more similar over time. By examining the 3-taxon case in some detail we illustrate that phylogeneticists have been ``spoiled'' in the sense of not having to think about the structural parameters in their models by virtue of the strong assumption that...

Data from: Age estimation in a long-lived seabird (Ardenna tenuirostris) using DNA methylation-based biomarkers

Ricardo De Paoli-Iseppi, Bruce E. Deagle, Andrea M. Polanowski, Clive R. McMahon, Joanne L. Dickinson, Mark A. Hindell & Simon N. Jarman
Age structure is a fundamental aspect of animal population biology. Age is strongly related to individual physiological condition, reproductive potential and mortality rate. Currently, there are no robust molecular methods for age estimation in birds. Instead, individuals must be ringed as chicks to establish known-age populations, which is a labour intensive and expensive process. The estimation of chronological age using DNA methylation is emerging as a robust approach in mammals including humans, mice and some...

Data from: Disentangling synergistic disease dynamics: Implications for the viral biocontrol of rabbits

Konstans Wells, Damien A. Fordham, Barry W. Brook, Phillip Cassey, Tarnya Cox, Robert B. O’Hara, Nina I. Schwensow & Robert B. O'Hara
European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) have been exposed to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and myxoma virus (MYXV) in their native and invasive ranges for decades. Yet, the long‐term effects of these viruses on rabbit population dynamics remain poorly understood. In this context, we analysed 17 years of detailed capture–mark–recapture data (2000–2016) from Turretfield, South Australia, using a probabilistic state‐space hierarchical modelling framework to estimate rabbit survival and epidemiological dynamics. While RHDV infection and disease‐induced death...

Data from: New determination of prey and parasite species for Northern Indian Ocean blue whales

Asha De Vos, Cassandra E. Faux, James Marthick, Joanne Dickinson, Simon Jarman & Simon N. Jarman
Blue whales are little studied, face significant anthropogenic threats and within the Northern Indian Ocean, have a restricted range, making them an archetype for conservation needs of megafauna around the world. We studied feeding behaviour of blue whales using dietary DNA metabarcoding of faecal samples. While globally blue whale populations feed predominantly on Euphausiidae, 87 % of prey DNA amplicons extracted from faecal samples from this population were sergestid shrimp, demonstrating that blue whales can...

Data from: Counting with DNA in metabarcoding studies: how should we convert sequence reads to dietary data?

Bruce E. Deagle, Austen C. Thomas, Julie C. McInnes, Laurence J. Clarke, Eero J. Vesterinen, Elizabeth L. Clare, Tyler R. Kartzinel & J. Paige Eveson
Advances in DNA sequencing technology have revolutionised the field of molecular analysis of trophic interactions and it is now possible to recover counts of food DNA sequences from a wide range of dietary samples. But what do these counts mean? To obtain an accurate estimate of a consumer’s diet should we work strictly with datasets summarising frequency of occurrence of different food taxa, or is it possible to use relative number of sequences? Both approaches...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • University of Tasmania
    29
  • La Trobe University
    4
  • Colorado State University
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Curtin University
    2