26 Works

Australian fur seal foraging consistency data

Cassie Speakman, John Arnould, Sebastian Lloyd, Elodie Camprasse, Andrew Hoskins, Mark Hindell, Daniel Costa & John Arnould
Substantial variation in foraging strategies can exist within populations, even those typically regarded as generalists. Specialisations arise from the consistent exploitation of a narrow behavioural, spatial or dietary niche over time, which may reduce intra-specific competition and influence adaptability to environmental change. However, few studies have investigated whether behavioural consistency confers benefits at the individual and/or population level. While still recovering from commercial sealing over-exploitation, Australian fur seals (AUFS; Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) represent the largest...

Endothermy makes fishes faster but does not expand their thermal niche

Lucy Harding, Andrew Jackson, Adam Barnett, Ian Donohue, Lewis Halsey, Charlie Huveneers, Carl Meyer, Yannis Papastamatiou, Jayson Semmens, Erin Spencer, Yuuki Watanabe & Nicholas Payne
1. Regional endothermy has evolved several times in marine fishes, and two competing hypotheses are generally proposed to explain the evolutionary drivers behind this trait: thermal niche expansion and elevated cruising speeds. Evidence to support either hypothesis is equivocal, and the ecological advantages conferred by endothermy in fishes remain debated. 2. By compiling published biologging data and collecting precise speed measurements from free-swimming fishes in the wild, we directly test whether endothermic fishes encounter broader...

Data from: Climate shapes the geographic distribution and introgressive spread of colour ornamentation in common wall lizards

Maravillas Ruiz Minano, Geoffrey While, Weizhao Yang, Christopher Burridge, Roberto Sacchi, Marco Zuffi, Stefano Scali, Daniele Salvi & Tobias Uller
Climate can exert an effect on the strength of sexual selection, but empirical evidence is limited. Here, we tested if climate predicts the geographic distribution and introgressive spread of sexually selected male colour ornamentation across 114 populations of the common wall lizard, Podarcis muralis. Colouration was highly structured across the landscape, and did not reflect genetic differentiation. Instead, colour ornamentation was consistently exaggerated in hot and dry environments, suggesting that climate-driven selection maintains geographic variation...

ISIMIP3b fishing input data

Yannick Rousseau, Julia Blanchard & Derek Tittensor
The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) provides a framework for the collation of a consistent set of climate impact data across sectors and scales. It also provides a unique opportunity for considering interactions between climate change impacts across sectors through consistent scenarios.
The ISIMIP3b part of the third simulation round is dedicated to a quantification of climate-related risks at different levels of global warming and socio-economic change. ISIMIP3b group I simulations are based on historical...

Four approaches leading to the age scale of the Young Island ice core

Dorothea Moser & Elizabeth Thomas
Young Island is a new ice core drilling site uniquely positioned to give insight into the (sub-)Antarctic climate. This dataset contains four preliminary dating approaches that lay the foundation for the age scale of the Young Island ice core presented in Moser et al. (2021). Funding was provided to SubICE by Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, the Swiss Polar Institute, and Ferring Pharmaceuticals Inc (grant no. SubICE). ERT received core funding from NERC to the...

Climate change impacts on seabirds and marine mammals: the importance of study duration, thermal tolerance and generation time

Florian Orgeret, Andréa Thiebault, Kit M. Kovacs, Christian Lydersen, Mark A. Hindell, Sarah Ann Thompson, William J. Sydeman & Pierre A. Pistorius
Understanding climate change impacts on top predators is fundamental to marine biodiversity conservation, due to their increasingly threatened populations and their importance in marine ecosystems. We conducted a systematic review of the effects of climate change (prolonged, directional change) and climate variability on seabirds and marine mammals. We extracted data from 484 studies (4808 published studies were reviewed), comprising 2215 observations on demography, phenology, distribution, diet, behaviour, body condition and physiology. The likelihood of concluding...

Individual variation in marine larval-fish swimming speed and the emergence of dispersal kernels

Scott Burgess, Michael Bode, Jeffrey Leis & Luciano Mason
Dispersal emerges as a consequence of how an individual’s phenotype interacts with the environment. Not all dispersing individuals have the same phenotype, and variation among individuals can generate complex variation in the distribution of dispersal distances and directions. While active locomotion performance is an obvious candidate for a dispersal phenotype, its effects on dispersal are difficult to measure or predict, especially in small organisms dispersing in wind or currents. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of...

Genomic divergence in sympatry indicates strong reproductive barriers and cryptic species within Eucalyptus salubris

Rachel Binks, Dorothy Steane & Margaret Byrne
Genetic studies are increasingly detecting cryptic taxa that likely represent a significant component of global biodiversity. However, cryptic taxa are often criticized because they are typically detected serendipitously and may not receive the follow-up study required to verify their geographic or evolutionary limits. Here, we follow-up a study of Eucalyptus salubris that unexpectedly detected two divergent lineages but was not sampled sufficiently to make clear interpretations. We undertook comprehensive sampling for an independent genomic analysis...

No-analogue associations in the fossil record of southern conifers reveal conservatism in precipitation, but not temperature axes

Matilda Brown, Timothy Brodribb & Gregory Jordan
Aim: Southern conifers have evolved under different evolutionary pressures to northern lineages, but in both regions these plants have undergone extensive extinction and range alteration over the Cenozoic (the last 66 million years). It is not possible to directly observe the ecology of fossils, but indirect evidence of changes in bioclimatic envelopes can be derived from no-analogue assemblages – groups of co-occurring fossils that have climatically incongruous living relatives. We identify and examine the specific...

Antibody features towards VAR2CSA and CSA binding infected erythrocytes in a cohort of pregnant women from PNG

Elizabeth Aitken, Amaya Ortega-Pajares, Agersew Alemu, Wina Hasang, Saber Dini, Holger Unger, Maria Ome-Kaius, Morten Nielsen, Ali Salanti, Joe Smith, Stephen Kent, P Mark Hogarth, Bruce Wines, Julie Simpson, Timon Damelang, Amy Chung & Stephen Rogerson
Plasmodium falciparum causes placental malaria, which results in adverse outcomes for mother and child. P. falciparum infected erythrocytes that express the parasite protein VAR2CSA on their surface can bind to placental chondroitin sulfate-A. It has been hypothesized that naturally acquired antibodies towards VAR2CSA protect against placental infection, but it has proven difficult to use measures of antibody to identify individuals protected from disease. We used a systems serology approach to identify naturally acquired antibody features...

Convergent tip-to-base widening of water-conducting conduits in the tallest bryophytes

Erin Bok, Jordan Gregory, Timothy Brodribb & Marc Carriquí
Background: Tip-to-base conduit widening is considered a key mechanism that enables vascular plants to grow tall by decreasing the hydraulic resistance imposed by increasing height. Widening of hydraulic anatomy (larger conducting elements towards the base of the vascular system) minimizes gradients in leaf-specific hydraulic conductance with plant height, allowing uniform photosynthesis across the crown of trees. Tip-to-base conduit widening has also been associated with changes in conduit number. However, in bryophytes, despite having representatives with...

Data from: Plant communities, populations and individuals have distinct responses to short-term warming and neighbour biomass removal in two montane grasslands

Travis Britton, Mark Hovenden, Meagan Porter, Rose Brinkhoff, Anna Flittner & Margaret Mayfield
Aims Climate change will impact plant communities and populations but also individual plant performance. Most predictive models of community responses to climate change ignore individual‐level biotic interactions despite their known importance for community diversity and functioning. Here, we consider plant fitness and diversity responses to climate change associated factors at three organisational levels: communities, populations and individual plants, to increase our understanding of how plant communities respond to climate change. Location Montane grassland, Tasmania, Australia....

The palaeoendemic conifer Pherosphaera hookeriana (Podocarpaceae) exhibits high genetic diversity despite Quaternary range contraction and post glacial bottlenecking

James Worth, James Marthick, Peter Harrison, Gregory Jordan & Shota Sakaguchi
Glacial relict plants are often endangered because extant populations can be small, geographically isolated and persist in suboptimal environments, leading to increased clonality and reduced genetic diversity putting their survival at further risk. This study examines how restriction to interglacial refugia has impacted the genetic diversity and structure of the threatened Tasmanian palaeoendemic, Pherosphaera hookeriana W. Archer bis. This species is a poorly dispersed, dioecious conifer that, having once been a major component of Last...

Cell wall thickness and composition are involved in photosynthetic limitation

Jaume Flexas, María José Clemente-Moreno, Josefina Bota, Tim J. Brodribb, Jorge Gago, Yusuke Mizokami, Miquel Nadal, Alicia V. Perera-Castro, Margalida Roig-Oliver, Daisuke Sugiura, Dongliang Xiong & Marc Carriquí
The key role of cell walls in setting mesophyll conductance to CO2 (gm) and, consequently, photosynthesis, is reviewed. First, the theoretical properties of cell walls that can affect gm are presented. Then, we focus on cell wall thickness (Tcw) reviewing empirical evidence showing that Tcw varies strongly among species and phylogenetic groups in a way that correlates with gm and photosynthesis i.e. the thicker the mesophyll cell walls, the lower gm and photosynthesis. Potential interplays...

Wilkes Land Adaptable Seismic Network

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Rapid Deployment Seismic Recorders for Interdisciplinary Antarctic Research. Preliminary targeting ice bedrock interface.

Data from: Bacterial epibiont communities of panmictic Antarctic krill are spatially structured

Laurence Clarke, Leonie Suter, Rob King, Andrew Bissett, Sophie Bestley & Bruce Deagle
Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) are amongst the most abundant animals on Earth, with a circumpolar distribution in the Southern Ocean. Genetic and genomic studies have failed to detect any population structure for the species, suggesting a single panmictic population. However, the hyper-abundance of krill slows the rate of genetic differentiation, masking potential underlying structure. Here we use high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to show that krill bacterial epibiont communities exhibit spatial structuring, driven...

Macquarie Ridge

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This network is comprised of 15 off-shore broadband ocean bottom seismometers (IGGCAS and AGOS) spanning October 2020 to November 2021 as well as 5 on-shore broadband stations (2020-2022) targeting Macquarie Island and its immediate surroundings.

CPR dataset for: Testing Bergmann's Rule in Marine Copepods

Max D. Campbell, David S. Schoeman, William Venables, Rana Abu-Alhaija, Sonia D. Batten, Sanae Chiba, Frank Coman, Claire H. Davies, Martin Edwards, Ruth Eriksen, Jason D. Everett, Yutaka Fukai, Mitsuo Fukuchi, Octavio Esquivel Garrote, Graham Hosie, Jenny Huggett, David G. Johns, John A. Kitchener, Philippe Koubbi, Felicity R. McEnnulty, Erik Muxagata, Clare Ostle, Karen V. Robinson, Anita Slotwinski, Kerrie M. Swadling … & Anthony J. Richardson
This is the global dataset used for the Campbell et al. (2021) paper “Testing Bergmann’s Rule in marine copepods”. The dataset includes the mean length of copepods weighted by abundance found in 97,830 continuous plankton recorder (CPR) samples. Further, it contains satellite observations for sea surface temperature, chlorophyll-a, and dissolved oxygen (see paper for details). It was a massive collaborative effort to get this dataset assembled by the Global Alliance of CPR Surveys (GACS 2011,...

Protein structure alignments and structural similarity score code for: Benchmarking methods of protein structure alignment

Janan Sykes
The function of a protein is primarily determined by its structure and amino acid sequence. Many biological questions of interest rely on being able to accurately determine the group of structures to which domains of a protein belong (often referred to as their `fold'); this can be done through alignment and comparison of protein structures. This fundamental task underpins predicting function, identification of homology, and testing hypotheses about the way "protein-space'' is organised. Dozens of...

Beyond leaf habit: generalities in plant function across 97 tropical dry forest tree species

German Vargas G., Tim J. Brodribb, Juan M. Dupuy, Roy González‐M., Catherine M. Hulshof, David Medvigy, Tristan A. P. Allerton, Camila Pizano, Beatriz Salgado‐Negret, Naomi B. Schwartz, Skip J. Van Bloem, Bonnie G. Waring & Jennifer S. Powers
Leaf habit has been hypothesized to define a linkage between the slow-fast plant economic spectrum and the drought resistance-avoidance trade-off in tropical forests (‘slow-safe versus fast-risky’). However, variation in hydraulic traits as a function of leaf habit has rarely been explored for a large number of species. We sampled leaf and branch functional traits of 97 tropical dry forest tree species from four sites to investigate whether patterns of trait variation varied consistently in relation...

Regarding the F-word: the effects of data Filtering on inferred genotype-environment associations

Collin Ahrens, Rebecca Jordan, Jason Bragg, Peter Harrison, Tara Hopley, Helen Bothwell, Kevin Murray, Dorothy Steane, John Whale, Margaret Byrne, Rose Andrew & Paul Rymer
Genotype-environment association (GEA) methods have become part of the standard landscape genomics toolkit, yet, we know little about how to best filter genotype-by-sequencing data to provide robust inferences for environmental adaptation. In many cases, default filtering thresholds for minor allele frequency and missing data are applied regardless of sample size, having unknown impacts on the results. These effects could be amplified in downstream predictions, including management strategies. Here, we investigate the effects of filtering on...

Using acoustic telemetry to quantify potential contaminant exposure of Vermilion Rockfish (Sebastes miniatus), Hornyhead Turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis), and White Croaker (Genyonemus lineatus) at wastewater outfalls in southern California

Echelle Burns, Barrett Wolfe, Jeff Armstrong, Danny Tang, Ken Sakamoto & Christopher Lowe
Contaminant Exposure Models (CEMs) were developed to predict population-level tissue contaminant concentrations in fishes by pairing sediment-bound contaminant concentrations (DDTs, PCBs) and fine-scale acoustic telemetry data from a habitat- associated species (Vermilion Rockfish, Sebastes miniatus), nomadic flatfish species (Hornyhead Turbot, Pleuronichthys verticalis), and nomadic benthic/midwater schooling species (White Croaker, Genyonemus lineatus) tagged near wastewater outfalls in southern California. Model results were compared to contaminant concentrations in tissue samples. The CEMs developed require further refinement before...

Characterizing the spatio-temporal threats, conservation hotspots and conservation gaps for the most extinction-prone bird family (Aves: Rallidae)

Lucile Lévêque
Here we worked on the rails (bird family Rallidae), looking at whether the current threats are consistent with those that led to recent extinctions, and ultimately, what conservation actions might be necessary to mitigate further losses. We undertook a global synthesis of the temporal and spatial threat patterns for Rallidae and determined conservation priorities and gaps.

Small invertebrate consumers produce consistent size spectra across reef habitats and climatic zones

Kate Fraser
Changes in invertebrate body size-distributions that follow loss of habitat-forming species can potentially affect a range of ecological processes, including predation and competition. In the marine environment, small crustaceans and other mobile invertebrates (‘epifauna’) represent a basal component in reef food webs, with a pivotal secondary production role that is strongly influenced by their body size-distribution. Ongoing degradation of reef habitats that affect invertebrate size distributions, particularly transformation of coral and kelp habitat to algal...

Do tradeoffs govern plant species responses to different global change treatments?

J. Adam Langley, Emily Grman, Kevin Wilcox, Meghan Avolio, Kimberly Komatsu, Scott Collins, Sally Koerner, Melinda Smith, Andrew Baldwin, William Bowman, Nona Chiariello, Anu Eskelinen, Harry Harmens, Mark Hovenden, Kari Klanderud, Rebecca McCulley, Vladimir Onipchenko, Clare Robinson & Katharine Suding
Plants are subject to tradeoffs among growth strategies such that adaptations for optimal growth in one condition can preclude optimal growth in another. Thus, we hypothesized that the response of plant species abundance to one global change treatment would relate inversely to the response to a second treatment, particularly for treatment combinations that accentuate distinct traits. To address this hypothesis, we examined plant species abundances in 39 global change experiments manipulating CO2, nitrogen, phosphorus, water,...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • University of Tasmania
    26
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • University of Copenhagen
    2
  • University of the Balearic Islands
    2
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    2
  • Nelson Mandela University
    2
  • Institute of Forest Ecology
    1
  • California State University, Long Beach
    1
  • Stanford University
    1