99 Works

Data from: Sex-chromosome differentiation parallels post-glacial range expansion in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea).

Christophe Dufresnes, Youna Bertholet, Jérôme Wassef, Karim Ghali, Romain Savary, Baptiste Pasteur, Alan Brelsford, Beata Rozenblut-Kościsty, Maria Ogielska, Matthias Stöck & Nicolas Perrin
Occasional XY recombination is a proposed explanation for the sex-chromosome homomorphy in European tree frogs. Numerous laboratory crosses, however, failed to detect any event of male recombination, and a detailed survey of NW-European Hyla arborea populations identified male-specific alleles at sex-linked loci, pointing to the absence of XY recombination in their recent history. Here we address this paradox in a phylogeographic framework, by genotyping sex-linked microsatellite markers in populations and sibships from the entire species...

Data from: Evolutionary melting pots: a biodiversity hotspot shaped by ring diversifications around the Black Sea in the Eastern tree frog (Hyla orientalis)

Christophe Dufresnes, Spartak N. Litvinchuk, Julien Leuenberger, Karim Ghali, Oleksandr Zinenko, Matthias Stöck & Nicolas Perrin
Hotspots of intraspecific genetic diversity, which are of primary importance for the conservation of species, have been associated with glacial refugia, that is areas where species survived the Quaternary climatic oscillations. However, the proximate mechanisms generating these hotspots remain an open issue. Hotspots may reflect the long-term persistence of large refugial populations; alternatively, they may result from allopatric differentiation between small and isolated populations, that later admixed. Here, we test these two scenarios in a...

Data from: Spatial scaling of environmental variables improves species-habitat models of fishes in a small, sand-bed lowland river

Johannes Radinger, Christian Wolter & Jochem Kail
Habitat suitability and the distinct mobility of species depict fundamental keys for explaining and understanding the distribution of river fishes. In recent years, comprehensive data on river hydromorphology has been mapped at spatial scales down to 100 m, potentially serving high resolution species-habitat models, e.g., for fish. However, the relative importance of specific hydromorphological and in-stream habitat variables and their spatial scales of influence is poorly understood. Applying boosted regression trees, we developed species-habitat models...

Data from: Contrasting the roles of section length and instream habitat enhancement for river restoration success: a field study on 20 European restoration projects

Daniel Hering, Jukka Aroviita, Annette Baattrup-Pedersen, Karel Brabec, Tom Buijse, Frauke Ecke, Nikolai Friberg, Marek Gielczewski, Kathrin Januschke, Jan Köhler, Benjamin Kupilas, Armin W. Lorenz, Susanne Muhar, Amael Paillex, Michaela Poppe, Torsten Schmidt, Stefan Schmutz, Jan Vermaat, Piet F. M. Verdonschot, Ralf C. M. Verdonschot, Jochem Kail & Christian Wolter
1. Restoration of river hydromorphology often has limited detected effects on river biota. One frequently discussed reason is that the restored river length is insufficient to allow populations to develop and give the room for geomorphologic processes to occur. 2. We investigated ten pairs of restored river sections of which one was a large project involving a long, intensively restored river section and one represented a smaller restoration effort. The restoration effect was quantified by...

Data from: Individual and group performance suffers from social niche disruption

Kate L. Laskowski, Pierre-Olivier Montiglio & Jonathan N. Pruitt
The associated article has been retracted over concerns relating to irregularities found in the raw data. Concerns relating to the data can be found in the retraction notice: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/708066 The social niche specialization hypothesis predicts that animal personalities emerge as a result of individuals occupying different social niches within a group. Here we track individual personality and performance, and collective performance among groups of social spiders where we manipulated the familiarity of the group members....

Data from: Fast-slow life history is correlated with individual differences in movements and prey selection in an aquatic predator in the wild

Shinnosuke Nakayama, Tobias Rapp & Robert Arlinghaus
Fast and slow life histories are proposed to covary with consistent individual differences in behaviour, but little is known whether it holds in the wild, where individuals experience natural fluctuations of the environment. We investigated whether individual differences in behaviour, such as movement traits and prey selection, are linked to variation in life-history traits in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) in the wild. Using high-resolution acoustic telemetry, we collected the positional data of fish in a...

Data from: Collective decision making in guppies: a cross-population comparison study in the wild

Romain J. G. Clément, Julián Vicente-Page, Richard P. Mann, Ashley J. W. Ward, Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers, Indar W. Ramnarine, Gonzalo G. De Polavieja & Jens Krause
Collective cognition has received much attention in recent years but most of the empirical work has focused on comparing individuals and groups within single populations, thereby not addressing evolutionary origins of collective cognition. Here we investigated collective cognition in multiple populations that are subject to different levels of predation. Guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were given a simultaneous choice between an edible and a non-edible stimulus. We found evidence for an improvement in decision accuracy when in...

Data from: On the occurrence of three non-native cichlid species including the first record of a feral population of Pelmatolapia (Tilapia) mariae (Boulenger, 1899) in Europe

Juliane A. Y. Lukas, Jonas Jourdan, Gregor Kalinkat, Sebastian Emde, Friedrich Miesen, Hannah Jüngling, Berardino Cocchiararo & David Bierbach
Thermally influenced freshwater systems provide suitable conditions for non-native species of tropical and subtropical origin to survive and form proliferating populations beyond their native ranges. In Germany, non-native convict cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) and tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) have established populations in the Gillbach, a small stream that receives warm water discharge from a local power plant. Here, we report on the discovery of spotted tilapia (Pelmatolapia mariae) in the Gillbach, the first record of a reproducing...

Data from: Towards a mechanistic understanding of vulnerability to hook-and-line fishing: boldness as the basic target of angling-induced selection

Thomas Klefoth, Christian Skov, Anna Kuparinen & Robert Arlinghaus
In passively operated fishing gear, boldness-related behaviors should fundamentally affect the vulnerability of individual fish and thus be under fisheries selection. To test this hypothesis, we used juvenile common-garden reared carp (Cyprinus carpio) within a narrow size-range to investigate the mechanistic basis of behavioral selection caused by angling. We focused on one key personality trait (i.e., boldness), measured in groups within ponds, two morphological traits (body-shape and head-shape), and one life-history trait (juvenile growth capacity)...

Data from: Experimental duration and predator satiation levels systematically affect functional response parameters

Yuanheng Li, Björn C. Rall & Gregor Kalinkat
Empirical feeding studies where density-dependent consumption rates are fitted to functional response models are often used to parameterize the interaction strengths in models of population or food-web dynamics. However, the relationship between functional response parameter estimates from short-term feeding studies and real-world, long-term, trophic interaction strengths remains largely unexamined. In a critical first step to address this void, we tested for systematic effects of experimental duration and predator satiation on the estimate of functional response...

Data from: Profound genetic divergence and asymmetric parental genome contributions as hallmarks of hybrid speciation in polyploid toads

Caroline Betto-Colliard, Sylvia Hofmann, Roberto Sermier, Nicolas Perrin & Matthias Stöck
The evolutionary causes and consequences of allopolyploidization, an exceptional pathway to instant hybrid speciation, are poorly investigated in animals. In particular, when and why hybrid polyploids versus diploids are produced, and constraints on sources of paternal and maternal ancestors, remain underexplored. Using the Palearctic green toad radiation (including bisexually reproducing species of three ploidy levels) as model, we generate a range-wide multi-locus phylogeny of 15 taxa and present four new insights: (i) At least five...

Data from: Using a robotic fish to investigate individual differences in social responsiveness in the guppy

David Bierbach, Tim Landgraf, Pawel Romanczuk, Juliane Lukas, Hai Nguyen, Max Wolf & Jens Krause
Responding towards the actions of others is one of the most important behavioral traits whenever animals of the same species interact. Mutual influences among interacting individuals may modulate the social responsiveness seen and thus makes it often difficult to study the level and individual variation in responsiveness. Here, open-loop biomimetic robots that provide standardized, non-interactive social cues can be a useful tool. These robots are not affected by the live animal’s actions but are assumed...

Data from: Testing the devil's impact on southern Baltic and North Sea basin whitefish (Coregonus spp.) diversity

Thomas Mehner, Kirsten Pohlmann, David Bittner & Jörg Freyhof
Background: The diversity and phylogeny of whitefish of the genus Coregonus is complex, and includes many endemic species of high conservation concern. However, because of commercial importance of whitefish fisheries, stockings and translocations have occurred repeatedly, which challenges the identification of local populations as conservation units. This study analyses the phylogenetic relationships of 15 contemporary and two historical populations of lake-resident and anadromous whitefish (Coregonus spp.) from the southern Baltic and North Sea basins. We...

Data from: Spatial variation in throughfall, soil, and plant water isotopes in a temperate forest

Gregory R. Goldsmith, Scott T. Allen, Sabine Braun, Nadine Engbersen, Clara Romero González-Quijano, James W. Kirchner & Rolf T.W. Siegwolf
Studies of stable isotopes of water in the environment have been fundamental to advancing our understanding of how water moves through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum; however, much of this research focuses on how water isotopes vary in time, rather than in space. We examined the spatial variation in the δ18O and δ2H of throughfall and bulk soil water, as well as branch xylem and bulk leaf water of Picea abies (Norway Spruce) and Fagus sylvatica (Beech),...

Data from: Size-selective harvesting fosters adaptations in mating behavior and reproductive allocation, affecting sexual selection in fish

Valerio Sbragaglia, Catalina Gliese, David Bierbach, Andrew Honsey, Silva Uusi-Heikkilä & Robert Arlinghaus
1. The role of sexual selection in the context of harvest-induced evolution is poorly understood. However, elevated and trait-selective harvesting of wild populations may change sexually-selected traits, which in turn can affect mate choice and reproduction. 2. We experimentally evaluated the potential for fisheries-induced evolution of mating behavior and reproductive allocation in fish. 3. We used a unique experimental system of zebrafish (Danio rerio) lines exposed to large, small, or random (i.e. control) size-selective mortality....

Rethinking megafauna

Marcos Moleón, José Sánchez-Zapata, José Donázar, Eloy Revilla, Berta Martín-López, Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas, Wayne Getz, Zebensui Morales-Reyes, Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, Larry Crowder, Mauro Galetti, Manuela González-Suárez, Fengzhi He, Pedro Jordano, Rebecca Lewison, Robin Naidoo, Norman Owen-Smith, Nuria Selva, Jens-Christian Svenning, José Tella, Christiane Zarfl, Sonja Jähnig, Matt Hayward, Søren Faurby, Nuria García … & Klement Tochner
Concern for megafauna is increasing among scientists and non-scientists. Many studies have emphasized that megafauna play prominent ecological roles and provide important ecosystem services to humanity. But, what precisely are “megafauna”? Here we critically assess the concept of megafauna and propose a goal-oriented framework for megafaunal research. First, we review definitions of megafauna and analyze associated terminology in the scientific literature. Second, we conduct a survey among ecologists and paleontologists to assess the species traits...

Parasite infection disrupts escape behaviour in fish shoals

Nicolle Demandt, Marit Praetz, Ralf Kurvers, Jens Krause, Joachim Kurtz & Jörn Scharsack
Many prey species have evolved collective responses to avoid predation. They rapidly transfer information about potential predators to trigger and coordinate escape waves. Predation avoidance behaviour is often manipulated by trophically transmitted parasites, to facilitate their transmission to the next host. We hypothesised that the presence of infected, behaviourally altered individuals might disturb the spread of escape waves. We used the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus, which increases risk-taking behaviour and decrease social responsiveness of its host,...

Size-selective mortality induces evolutionary changes in group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a fish

Valerio Sbragaglia, Valerio Sbragaglia, Jose Fernando López-Olmeda, Elena Frigato, Cristiano Bertolucci & Robert Arlinghaus
1. Intensive and trait-selective mortality of fish and wildlife can cause evolutionary changes in a range of life-history and behavioral traits. These changes might in turn alter the circadian system due to coevolutionary mechanisms or correlated selection responses both at behavioral and molecular levels, with knock-on effects on daily physiological processes and behavioral outputs. 2. We examined the evolutionary impact of size-selective harvesting on group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a model fish...

The emergence and development of behavioral individuality in clonal fish

Kate Laskowski, David Bierbach, Jolle Jolles, Carolina Doran & Max Wolf
Behavioral individuality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in animal populations, yet the origins and developmental trajectories of individuality, especially very early in life, are still a black box. Using a high-resolution tracking system, we mapped the behavioral trajectories of genetically identical fish (Poecilia formosa), separated immediately after birth into identical environments, over the first 10 weeks of their life at 3s resolution. We find that (i) strong behavioral individuality is present at the very first day...

Data from: Adaptive genetic divergence along narrow environmental gradients in four stream insects

Kozo Watanabe, So Kazama, Tatsuo Omura & Michael T. Monaghan
A central question linking ecology with evolutionary biology is how environmental heterogeneity can drive adaptive genetic divergence among populations. We examined adaptive divergence of four stream insects from six adjacent catchments in Japan by combining field measures of habitat and resource components with genome scans of non-neutral Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) loci. Neutral genetic variation was used to measure gene flow and non-neutral genetic variation was used to test for adaptive divergence. We identified...

Data from: Population genomics of wild and laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Andrew R Whiteley, Anuradha Bhat, Emilia P Martins, Richard L Mayden, M Arunachalam, Silva Uusi-Heikkilä, A.T.A. Ahmed, Jiwan Shrestha, Matthew Clark, Derek Stemple & Louis Bernatchez
Understanding a wider range of genotype-phenotype associations can be achieved through ecological and evolutionary studies of traditional laboratory models. Here, we conducted the first large-scale geographic analysis of genetic variation within and among wild zebrafish (Danio rerio) populations occurring in Nepal, India, and Bangladesh and we genetically compared wild populations to several commonly used lab strains. We examined genetic variation at 1,832 polymorphic EST-based SNPs and the cytb mitochondrial gene in 13 wild populations and...

Data from: Population differentiation of zander (Sander lucioperca, Linnaeus, 1758) across native and newly colonized ranges suggests increasing admixture in the course of an invasion

Erik Eschbach, Arne W. Nolte, Klaus Kohlmann, Petra Kersten, Robert Arlinghaus & Jochem Kail
In addition to ecological factors, evolutionary processes can determine the invasion success of a species. In particular, genetic admixture has the potential to induce rapid evolutionary change, which can result from natural or human-assisted secondary contact between differentiated populations. We studied the recent range expansion of zander in Germany focusing on the interplay between invasion and genetic admixture. Historically, the rivers Elbe and Danube harboured the most north-western source populations from which a north-westward range...

Data from: The QRS (Quantification of Representative Sequences) pipeline for amplicon sequencing: case study on within-population ITS1 sequence variation in a microparasite infecting Daphnia

Enrique Gonzalez-Tortuero, Jakub Rusek, Adam Petrusek, Sabine Giessler, Dimitrios Lyras, Sonja Grath, Federico Castro-Monzon & Justyna Wolinska
Next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are replacing traditional molecular biology protocols like cloning and Sanger sequencing. However, accuracy of NGS platforms has rarely been measured when quantifying relative frequencies of genotypes or taxa within populations. Here we developed a new bioinformatic pipeline (QRS) that pools similar sequence variants and estimates their frequencies in NGS data sets from populations or communities. We tested whether the estimated frequency of representative sequences, generated by 454 amplicon sequencing, differs...

Data from: Population structure of a microparasite infecting Daphnia: spatio-temporal dynamics

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Background: Detailed knowledge of spatial and temporal variation in the genetic population structure of hosts and parasites is required for understanding of hostparasite coevolution. As hot-spots of contemporary coevolution in natural systems are difficult to detect and long-term studies are restricted to few systems additional population genetic data from various hostparasite systems may provide important insights into the topic. This is particularly true for parasites as these players have been under-investigated so far due to...

Data from: Proto-cooperation: group hunting sailfish improve hunting success by alternating attacks on grouping prey

James E. Herbert-Read, Pawel Romanczuk, Stefan Krause, Daniel Strömbom, Pierre Couillaud, Paolo Domenici, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers, Stefano Marras, John F. Steffensen, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Jens Krause, Alexander D. M. Wilson & Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers
We present evidence of a novel form of group hunting. Individual sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) alternate attacks with other group members on their schooling prey (Sardinella aurita). While only 24% of attacks result in prey capture, multiple prey are injured in 95% of attacks, resulting in an increase of injured fish in the school with the number of attacks. How quickly prey are captured is positively correlated with the level of injury of the school, suggesting...

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Affiliations

  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
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  • Freie Universität Berlin
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  • Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
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