102 Works

Data from: Size-selective harvesting fosters adaptations in mating behavior and reproductive allocation, affecting sexual selection in fish

Valerio Sbragaglia, Catalina Gliese, David Bierbach, Andrew Honsey, Silva Uusi-Heikkilä & Robert Arlinghaus
1. The role of sexual selection in the context of harvest-induced evolution is poorly understood. However, elevated and trait-selective harvesting of wild populations may change sexually-selected traits, which in turn can affect mate choice and reproduction. 2. We experimentally evaluated the potential for fisheries-induced evolution of mating behavior and reproductive allocation in fish. 3. We used a unique experimental system of zebrafish (Danio rerio) lines exposed to large, small, or random (i.e. control) size-selective mortality....

Size-selective mortality induces evolutionary changes in group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a fish

Valerio Sbragaglia, Valerio Sbragaglia, Jose Fernando López-Olmeda, Elena Frigato, Cristiano Bertolucci & Robert Arlinghaus
1. Intensive and trait-selective mortality of fish and wildlife can cause evolutionary changes in a range of life-history and behavioral traits. These changes might in turn alter the circadian system due to coevolutionary mechanisms or correlated selection responses both at behavioral and molecular levels, with knock-on effects on daily physiological processes and behavioral outputs. 2. We examined the evolutionary impact of size-selective harvesting on group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a model fish...

Parasite infection disrupts escape behaviour in fish shoals

Nicolle Demandt, Marit Praetz, Ralf Kurvers, Jens Krause, Joachim Kurtz & Jörn Scharsack
Many prey species have evolved collective responses to avoid predation. They rapidly transfer information about potential predators to trigger and coordinate escape waves. Predation avoidance behaviour is often manipulated by trophically transmitted parasites, to facilitate their transmission to the next host. We hypothesised that the presence of infected, behaviourally altered individuals might disturb the spread of escape waves. We used the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus, which increases risk-taking behaviour and decrease social responsiveness of its host,...

The emergence and development of behavioral individuality in clonal fish

Kate Laskowski, David Bierbach, Jolle Jolles, Carolina Doran & Max Wolf
Behavioral individuality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in animal populations, yet the origins and developmental trajectories of individuality, especially very early in life, are still a black box. Using a high-resolution tracking system, we mapped the behavioral trajectories of genetically identical fish (Poecilia formosa), separated immediately after birth into identical environments, over the first 10 weeks of their life at 3s resolution. We find that (i) strong behavioral individuality is present at the very first day...

Research data_ upload.xlsx

Christof Sager, Kai Mangelsdorf, Alessandro Airo, Dirk Schulze-Makuch & Felix L. Arens
Data for the manuscript entitled: Habitability of Polygonal Soils in the Hyper-arid Atacama Desert after a Simulated Rain Experiment
Authors: Christof Sager, Alessandro Airo, Kai Mangelsdorf, Felix L. Arens, Cornelia Karger, Dirk Schulze-Makuch

Data from: Genetic structure of Daphnia galeata populations in Eastern China

Wenzhi Wei, Sabine Gießler, Justyna Wolinska, Xiaolin Ma, Zhong Yang, Wei Hu & Mingbo Yin
This study presents the first examination of the genetic structure of Daphnia longispina complex populations in Eastern China. Only one species, D. galeata, was present across the eight investigated lakes; as identified by taxon assignment using allelic variation at 15 microsatellite loci. Three genetically differentiated D. galeata subgroups emerged independent of the type of statistical analysis applied. Thus, Bayesian clustering, discriminant analysis based on results from factorial correspondence analysis, and UPGMA clustering consistently showed that...

Data from: Conservation phylogeography: does historical diversity contribute to regional vulnerability in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea)

Christophe Dufresnes, Jérôme Wassef, Karim Ghali, Alan Brelsford, Matthias Stöck, Petros Lymberakis, Jelka Crnobrnja-Isailović & Nicolas Perrin
Documenting and preserving the genetic diversity of populations, which conditions their long-term survival, has become a major issue in conservation biology. The loss of diversity often documented in declining populations is usually assumed to result from human disturbances; however, historical biogeographic events, otherwise known to strongly impact diversity, are rarely considered in this context. We apply a multi-locus phylogeographic study to investigate the late-Quaternary history of a tree frog (Hyla arborea) with declining populations in...

Data from: Persistent social interactions beget more pronounced personalities in a desert-dwelling social spider

Andreas P. Modlmeier, Kate L. Laskowski, Alex E. DeMarco, Anna Coleman, Katherine Zhao, Hayley A. Brittingham, Donna R. McDermott & Jonathan N. Pruitt
The social niche specialization hypothesis predicts that repeated social interactions will generate social niches within groups, thereby promoting consistent individual differences in behaviour. Current support for this hypothesis is mixed, probably because the importance of social niches is dependent upon the ecology of the species. We test whether repeated interactions among group mates generate consistent individual differences in boldness in the social spider, Stegodyphus dumicola. In support of the social niche specialization hypothesis, we found...

Data from: Performance assessment of two whole-lake acoustic positional telemetry systems - is reality mining of free-ranging aquatic animals technologically possible?

Henrik Baktoft, Petr Zajicek, Thomas Klefoth, Jon Christian Svendsen, Lene Jacobsen, Martin Wæver Pedersen, David March Morla, Christian Skov, Shinnosuke Nakayama & Robert Arlinghaus
Acoustic positional telemetry systems (APTs) represent a novel approach to study the behaviour of free ranging aquatic animals in the wild at unprecedented detail. System manufactures promise remarkably high temporal and spatial resolution. However, the performance of APTs has rarely been rigorously tested at the level of entire ecosystems. Moreover, the effect of habitat structure on system performance has only been poorly documented. Two APTs were deployed to cover two small lakes and a series...

Data from: Street lighting: sex-independent impacts on moth movement

Tobias Degen, Oliver Mitesser, Elizabeth K. Perkin, Nina-Sophie Weiß, Martin Oehlert, Emily Mattig & Franz Hölker
1.Artificial lights have become an integral and welcome part of our urban and peri-urban environments. However, recent research has highlighted the potentially negative ecological consequences of ubiquitous artificial light. In particular, insects, especially moths, are expected to be negatively impacted by the presence of artificial lights. Previous research with light traps has shown a male-biased attraction to light in moths. 2.In this study, we sought to determine if street lights could limit moth dispersal and...

Data from: The making of winners (and losers): how early dominance interactions determine adult social structure in a clonal fish

Kate L. Laskowski, Max Wolf & David Bierbach
Across a wide range of animal taxa, winners of previous fights are more likely to keep winning future contests, just as losers are more likely to keep losing. At present, such winner and loser effects are considered to be fairly transient. However, repeated experiences with winning and/or losing might increase the persistence of these effects generating long-lasting consequences for social structure. To test this, we exposed genetically identical individuals of a clonal fish, the Amazon...

Data from: DISCOMARK: nuclear marker discovery from orthologous sequences using draft genome data

Sereina Rutschmann, Harald Detering, Sabrina Simon, Jakob Fredslund & Michael T. Monaghan
High-throughput sequencing has laid the foundation for fast and cost-effective development of phylogenetic markers. Here we present the program discomark, which streamlines the development of nuclear DNA (nDNA) markers from whole-genome (or whole-transcriptome) sequencing data, combining local alignment, alignment trimming, reference mapping and primer design based on multiple sequence alignments to design primer pairs from input orthologous sequences. To demonstrate the suitability of discomark, we designed markers for two groups of species, one consisting of...

Data from: Socio-economic impact classification of alien taxa (SEICAT)

Sven Bacher, Tim M. Blackburn, Franz Essl, Piero Genovesi, Jaakko Heikkilä, Jonathan M. Jeschke, Glyn Jones, Reuben Keller, Marc Kenis, Christoph Kueffer, Angeliki F. Martinou, Wolfgang Nentwig, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Wolfgang Rabitsch, David M. Richardson, Helen E. Roy, Wolf-Christian Saul, Riccardo Scalera, Montserrat Vila, John R. U. Wilson, Sabina Kumschick & Sabrina Kumschick
Many alien taxa are known to cause socio-economic impacts by affecting the different constituents of human well-being (security; material and non-material assets; health; social, spiritual and cultural relations; freedom of choice and action). Attempts to quantify socio-economic impacts in monetary terms are unlikely to provide a useful basis for evaluating and comparing impacts of alien taxa because they are notoriously difficult to measure and important aspects of human well-being are ignored. Here, we propose a...

Data from: Dietary changes in predators and scavengers in a nocturnally illuminated riparian ecosystem

Alessandro Manfrin, David Lehmann, Roy H.A. Van Grunsven, Stefano Larsen, Jari Syväranta, Geraldene Wharton, Christian C. Voigt, Michael T. Monaghan, Franz Hölker & Roy H. A. Van Grunsven
Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked by fluxes of carbon and nutrients in riparian areas. Processes that alter these fluxes may therefore change the diet and composition of consumer communities. We used stable carbon isotope (δ13C) analyses to test whether the increased abundance of aquatic prey observed in another study led to a dietary shift in riparian consumers in areas illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN). We measured the contribution of aquatic-derived carbon to...

Data from: Parasites driving host diversity: incidence of disease correlated with Daphnia clonal turnover

Patrick Turko, Christoph Tellenbach, Esther Keller, Nadine Tardent, Barbara Keller, Piet Spaak & Justyna Wolinska
According to the Red Queen hypothesis, clonal diversity in asexual populations could be maintained by negative frequency-dependant selection by co-evolving parasites. If common clones are selected against and rare clones gain a concomitant advantage, we expect that clonal turnover should be faster during parasite epidemics than between them. We tested this hypothesis exploring field data of the Daphnia – Caullerya host-parasite system. The clonal make-up and turnover of the Daphnia host population was tracked with...

Data from: Encountering a bait is necessary but insufficient to explain individual variability in vulnerability to angling in two freshwater benthivorous fish in the wild

Christopher Thomas Monk & Robert Arlinghaus
Fish personality traits, such as swimming activity, or personality related emergent behavioural properties, such as space use, should affect encounter rates between fish and fishing gear. Increased encounters should in turn drive vulnerability to capture by passively operated fishing gears. However, empirical evidence documenting a relationship between activity-based behaviours and vulnerability to capture in the wild is limited. Using whole-lake acoustic telemetry, we first documented significant repeatabilities over several months of a suite of encounter...

Data from: Comparative tests of the species-genetic diversity correlation at neutral and non-neutral loci in four species of stream insect

Kozo Watanabe & Michael T. Monaghan
A fundamental question linking population genetics and community ecology is how adaptive processes (e.g., natural selection) and neutral processes (e.g., drift-migration equilibrium) underpin the species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC). Here we combine genome scans and outlier loci detection with community analysis to separately test for neutral and non-neutral SGDCs in four species of stream insect. We sampled 60 localities in Japan and examined the relationships among population AFLP band richness (Br), taxon richness of the total...

Data from: Evolution of defence cocktails: antimicrobial peptide combinations reduce mortality and persistent infection

Caroline Zanchi, Paul R. Johnston & Jens Rolff
The simultaneous expression of costly immune effectors such as multiple antimicrobial peptides is a hallmark of innate immunity of multicellular organisms, yet the adaptive advantage remains unresolved. Here, we test current hypotheses on the evolution of such defence cocktails. We use RNAi gene knock-down to explore, the effects of three highly expressed antimicrobial peptides, displaying different degrees of activity in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus, during an infection in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. We find that...

Data from: Impacts of deforestation-induced warming on the metabolism, growth, and trophic interactions of an afrotropical stream fish

Vincent Fugère, Thomas Mehner & Lauren J. Chapman
1. In ectotherms, anthropogenic warming often increases energy requirements for metabolism, which can either impair growth (when resources are limiting) or lead to higher predator feeding rates and possibly stronger top-down trophic interactions. However, the relative importance of these effects in nature remains unclear because: 1) thermal adaptation or acclimation could lower metabolic costs; 2) greater prey production at warmer temperatures could compensate for higher predator feeding rates; and/or 3) temperature effects on trophic interactions...

Personality driven life-history trade-offs differ in two sub-populations of free ranging predators

Félicie Dhellemmes, Jean-Sebastien Finger, Matthew Smukall, Samuel Gruber, Tristan Guttridge, Kate Laskowski & Jens Krause
1) Consistent individual differences in behaviour (i.e. personality) can be explained in an evolutionary context if they are favoured by life-history trade-offs as conceptualized in the pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis. Theory predicts that faster growing individuals suffer higher mortality and that this trade-off is mediated through exploration/risk-taking personality, but empirical support for this remains limited and ambiguous. Equivocal support to the POLS hypothesis suggests that the link between life-history and personality may only emerge under...

Data from: Gene expression response to a nematode parasite in novel and native eel hosts

Seraina E. Bracamonte, Paul R. Johnston, Michael T. Monaghan & Klaus Knopf
Invasive parasites are involved in population declines of new host species worldwide. The high susceptibilities observed in many novel hosts have been attributed to the lack of protective immunity to the parasites which native hosts acquired during their shared evolution. We experimentally infected Japanese eels (Anguilla japonica) and European eels (A. anguilla) with Anguillicola crassus, a nematode parasite that is native to the Japanese eel and invasive in the European eel. We inferred gene expression...

The battle between harvest and natural selection creates small and shy fish

Christopher Monk, Dorte Bekkevold, Thomas Klefoth, Thilo Pagel, Miquel Palmer & Robert Arlinghaus
Harvest of fish and wildlife, both commercial and recreational, is a selective force that can induce evolutionary changes to life-history and behaviour. Natural selective forces may create countering selection pressures. Assessing natural fitness represents a considerable challenge in broadcast spawners. Thus, our understanding of the relative strength of natural and fisheries selection is slim. In the field, we compared the strength and shape of harvest selection to natural selection on body size over four years...

Spatial and local environmental factors outweigh geo-climatic gradients in structuring taxonomically and trait-based β-diversity of benthic algae

Naicheng Wu, Shuchan Zhou, Min Zhang, Wenqi Peng, Kun Guo, Xiaodong Qu & Fengzhi He
Aim Understanding the variation in biodiversity and its underlying drivers and mechanisms is a core task in biogeography and ecology. We examined (a) the relative contributions of species replacement (i.e., turnover) and richness difference (i.e., nestedness) to taxonomically and trait-based β-diversity of stream benthic algae; (b) whether these two facets of β-diversity are correlated with each other; and (c) the relative contributions of local environmental, geo-climatic and spatial factors to the two facets of β-diversity...

Extracted data from primary literature examining impacts of recreational activities on freshwater ecosystems

Malwina Schafft, Benjamin Wegner, Nora Meyer, Christian Wolter & Robert Arlinghaus
Aquatic ecosystems are attractive sites for recreation. However, human presence at or on aquatic ecosystems can have a range of ecological impacts, creating trade-offs between recreation as ecosystem service and biodiversity conservation. There is currently no synthesis of evidence regarding the ecological impacts associated with various forms of aquatic recreation, to compare the magnitude of effects between types of recreation. Therefore, conservation conflicts surrounding water-based recreation are difficult to manage. We conducted a global meta-analysis,...

Supplementary datasets for eRNA community and Functional annotations

Mina Bizic, Danny Ionescu, Rajat Karnatak, Camille L. Musseau, Gabriela Onandia, Stella A. Berger, Jens C. Nejstgaard, Gunnar Lischeid, Mark O. Gessner, Sabine Wollrab & Hans-Peter Grossart
Changes in land use and agricultural intensification threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning of small water bodies. We studied 67 kettle holes (KH) in an agricultural landscape in northeastern Germany using landscape-scale metatranscriptomics, to understand the responses of active bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities, to land-use type. These KH are proxies of the millions of small standing water bodies of glacial origin spread across the northern hemisphere. Like other landscapes in Europe, the study area has...

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Affiliations

  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    102
  • Freie Universität Berlin
    12
  • Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
    7
  • Humboldt University of Berlin
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  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
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