19 Works

Data from: Proto-cooperation: group hunting sailfish improve hunting success by alternating attacks on grouping prey

James E. Herbert-Read, Pawel Romanczuk, Stefan Krause, Daniel Strömbom, Pierre Couillaud, Paolo Domenici, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers, Stefano Marras, John F. Steffensen, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Jens Krause, Alexander D. M. Wilson & Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers
We present evidence of a novel form of group hunting. Individual sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) alternate attacks with other group members on their schooling prey (Sardinella aurita). While only 24% of attacks result in prey capture, multiple prey are injured in 95% of attacks, resulting in an increase of injured fish in the school with the number of attacks. How quickly prey are captured is positively correlated with the level of injury of the school, suggesting...

Data from: Parental and hybrid Daphnia from the D. longispina complex: long-term dynamics in genetic structure and significance of overwintering modes

Johanna Griebel, Sabine Gießler, Mingbo Yin & Justyna Wolinska
In recent decades, hybridization has become a focus of attention because of its role in evolutionary processes. However, little is known about changes in genetic structure within and between parental species and hybrids over time. Here, we studied processes of genetic change in parental species and hybrids from the Daphnia longispina complex (Crustacea, Cladocera) over a period of six years across ten habitats. These cyclical parthenogens respond to fluctuating environments by switching from asexual to...

Data from: Biotic and abiotic variables influencing plant litter breakdown in streams: a global study

Luz Boyero, Richard Pearson, Cang Hui, Mark Gessner, Javier Perez, Markos Alexandrou, Manuel Graça, Bradley Cardinale, Ricardo Albariño, M. Arunachalam, Leon Barmuta, Andrew Boulton, Andreas Bruder, Marcos Callisto, Eric Chauvet, Russell Death, David Dudgeon, Andrea Encalada, Veronica Ferreira, Ricardo Figueroa, Alex Flecker, , Julie Helson, Tomoya Iwata, Tajang Jinggut … & Catherine Yule
Plant litter breakdown is a key ecological process in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Streams and rivers, in particular, have high rates of carbon dioxide evasion and they contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes. However, there is little information available on the relative roles of different drivers of plant litter breakdown in fresh waters, particularly at large scales. We present a global-scale study of litter breakdown in streams to compare the roles of biotic, climatic and...

Data from: Effects of experimental warming on biodiversity depend on ecosystem type and local species composition

Daniel S. Gruner, Matthew E. S. Bracken, Stella A. Berger, Britas Klemens Eriksson, Lars Gamfeldt, Birte Matthiessen, Stefanie Moorthi, Ulrich Sommer & Helmut Hillebrand
Climatic warming is a primary driver of change in ecosystems worldwide. Here, we synthesize responses of species richness and evenness from 187 experimental warming studies in a quantitative meta-analysis. We asked 1) whether effects of warming on diversity were detectable and consistent across terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems, 2) if effects on diversity correlated with intensity, duration, and experimental unit size of temperature change manipulations, and 3) whether these experimental effects on diversity interacted with...

Data from: Metabarcoding and metabolome analyses of copepod grazing reveal feeding preference and linkage to metabolite classes in dynamic microbial plankton communities

Jessica L. Ray, Julia Althammer, Katrine S. Skaar, Paolo Simonelli, Aud Larsen, Diane Stoecker, Andrey Sazhin, Umer Z. Ijaz, Christopher Quince, Jens C. Nejstgaard, Marc Frischer, Georg Pohnert & Christofer Troedsson
In order to characterize copepod feeding in relation to microbial plankton community dynamics, we combined metabarcoding and metabolome analyses during a 22-day seawater mesocosm experiment. Nutrient amendment of mesocosms promoted the development of haptophyte (Phaeocystis pouchetii)- and diatom (Skeletonema marinoi)-dominated plankton communities in mesocosms, in which Calanus sp. copepods were incubated for 24 h in flow-through chambers to allow access to prey particles (<500 μm). Copepods and mesocosm water sampled six times spanning the experiment...

Data from: Experimental illumination of a forest: no effects of lights of different colours on the onset of the dawn chorus in songbirds

Arnaud Da Silva, Maaike De Jong, Roy H. A. Van Grunsven, Marcel E. Visser, Bart Kempenaers & Kamiel Spoelstra
Light pollution is increasing exponentially, but its impact on animal behaviour is still poorly understood. For songbirds, the most repeatable finding is that artificial night lighting leads to an earlier daily onset of dawn singing. Most of these studies are, however, correlational and cannot entirely dissociate effects of light pollution from other effects of urbanization. In addition, there are no studies in which the effects of different light colours on singing have been tested. Here,...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny and timing of diversification in Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae)

Laurent Vuataz, Sereina Rutschmann, Michael T. Monaghan & Michel Sartori
Background Larvae of the Holarctic mayfly genus Rhithrogena Eaton, 1881 (Ephemeroptera, Heptageniidae) are a diverse and abundant member of stream and river communities and are routinely used as bio-indicators of water quality. Rhithrogena is well diversified in the European Alps, with a number of locally endemic species, and several cryptic species have been recently detected. While several informal species groups are morphologically well defined, a lack of reliable characters for species identification considerably hampers their...

Data from: Altered trait variability in response to size-selective mortality

Silva Uusi-Heikkilä, Kai Lindström, Noora Parre, Robert Arlinghaus, Josep Alós & Anna Kuparinen
Changes in trait variability owing to size-selective harvesting have received little attention in comparison with changes in mean trait values, perhaps because of the expectation that phenotypic variability should generally be eroded by directional selection typical for fishing and hunting. We show, however, that directional selection, in particular for large body size, leads to increased body-size variation in experimentally harvested zebrafish (Danio rerio) populations exposed to two alternative feeding environments: ad libitum and temporarily restricted...

Data from: Individual and group performance suffers from social niche disruption

Kate L. Laskowski, Pierre-Olivier Montiglio & Jonathan N. Pruitt
The associated article has been retracted over concerns relating to irregularities found in the raw data. Concerns relating to the data can be found in the retraction notice: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/708066 The social niche specialization hypothesis predicts that animal personalities emerge as a result of individuals occupying different social niches within a group. Here we track individual personality and performance, and collective performance among groups of social spiders where we manipulated the familiarity of the group members....

Data from: Evolutionary melting pots: a biodiversity hotspot shaped by ring diversifications around the Black Sea in the Eastern tree frog (Hyla orientalis)

Christophe Dufresnes, Spartak N. Litvinchuk, Julien Leuenberger, Karim Ghali, Oleksandr Zinenko, Matthias Stöck & Nicolas Perrin
Hotspots of intraspecific genetic diversity, which are of primary importance for the conservation of species, have been associated with glacial refugia, that is areas where species survived the Quaternary climatic oscillations. However, the proximate mechanisms generating these hotspots remain an open issue. Hotspots may reflect the long-term persistence of large refugial populations; alternatively, they may result from allopatric differentiation between small and isolated populations, that later admixed. Here, we test these two scenarios in a...

Data from: Fast-slow life history is correlated with individual differences in movements and prey selection in an aquatic predator in the wild

Shinnosuke Nakayama, Tobias Rapp & Robert Arlinghaus
Fast and slow life histories are proposed to covary with consistent individual differences in behaviour, but little is known whether it holds in the wild, where individuals experience natural fluctuations of the environment. We investigated whether individual differences in behaviour, such as movement traits and prey selection, are linked to variation in life-history traits in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) in the wild. Using high-resolution acoustic telemetry, we collected the positional data of fish in a...

Data from: Street lighting: sex-independent impacts on moth movement

Tobias Degen, Oliver Mitesser, Elizabeth K. Perkin, Nina-Sophie Weiß, Martin Oehlert, Emily Mattig & Franz Hölker
1.Artificial lights have become an integral and welcome part of our urban and peri-urban environments. However, recent research has highlighted the potentially negative ecological consequences of ubiquitous artificial light. In particular, insects, especially moths, are expected to be negatively impacted by the presence of artificial lights. Previous research with light traps has shown a male-biased attraction to light in moths. 2.In this study, we sought to determine if street lights could limit moth dispersal and...

Data from: The making of winners (and losers): how early dominance interactions determine adult social structure in a clonal fish

Kate L. Laskowski, Max Wolf & David Bierbach
Across a wide range of animal taxa, winners of previous fights are more likely to keep winning future contests, just as losers are more likely to keep losing. At present, such winner and loser effects are considered to be fairly transient. However, repeated experiences with winning and/or losing might increase the persistence of these effects generating long-lasting consequences for social structure. To test this, we exposed genetically identical individuals of a clonal fish, the Amazon...

Data from: DISCOMARK: nuclear marker discovery from orthologous sequences using draft genome data

Sereina Rutschmann, Harald Detering, Sabrina Simon, Jakob Fredslund & Michael T. Monaghan
High-throughput sequencing has laid the foundation for fast and cost-effective development of phylogenetic markers. Here we present the program discomark, which streamlines the development of nuclear DNA (nDNA) markers from whole-genome (or whole-transcriptome) sequencing data, combining local alignment, alignment trimming, reference mapping and primer design based on multiple sequence alignments to design primer pairs from input orthologous sequences. To demonstrate the suitability of discomark, we designed markers for two groups of species, one consisting of...

Data from: Woodstoich III: integrating tools of nutritional geometry and ecological stoichiometry to advance nutrient budgeting and the prediction of consumer-driven nutrient recycling

Erik Sperfeld, Halvor M. Halvorson, Matthew Malishev, Fiona J. Clissold & Nicole D. Wagner
Within the last two decades, ecological stoichiometry (ES) and nutritional geometry (NG, also known as geometric framework for nutrition) have delivered novel insights into core questions of nutritional ecology. These two nutritionally explicit frameworks differ in the ‘nutrient currency’ used and the focus of their past research; behavioural feeding strategies in NG, mainly investigating terrestrial organisms, and trophic ecology in ES, mainly in aquatic settings. However, both NG and ES have developed in explaining patterns...

Data from: Empirical evidence for large X-effects in animals with undifferentiated sex chromosomes

Christophe Dufresnes, Tomasz Majtyka, Stuart J. E. Baird, Jörn F. Gerchen, Amaël Borzée, Romain Savary, Maria Ogielska, Nicolas Perrin & Matthias Stöck
Reproductive isolation is crucial for the process of speciation to progress. Sex chromosomes have been assigned a key role in driving reproductive isolation but empirical evidence from natural population processes has been restricted to organisms with degenerated sex chromosomes such as mammals and birds. Here we report restricted introgression at sex-linked compared to autosomal markers in a hybrid zone between two incipient species of European tree frog, Hyla arborea and H. orientalis, whose homologous X...

Data from: Importance of latrine communication in European rabbits shifts along a rural–to–urban gradient

Madlen Ziege, David Bierbach, Svenja Bischoff, Anna-Lena Brandt, Mareike Brix, Bastian Greshake, Stefan Merker, Sandra Wenninger, Torsten Wronski & Martin Plath
BACKGROUND: Information transfer in mammalian communication networks is often based on the deposition of excreta in latrines. Depending on the intended receiver(s), latrines are either formed at territorial boundaries (between-group communication) or in core areas of home ranges (within-group communication). The relative importance of both types of marking behavior should depend, amongst other factors, on population densities and social group sizes, which tend to differ between urban and rural wildlife populations. Our study is the...

Data from: Assessing patterns in introduction pathways of alien species by linking major invasion databases

Wolf-Christian Saul, Helen E. Roy, Olaf Booy, Lucilla Carnevali, Hsuan-Ju Chen, Piero Genovesi, Colin A. Harrower, Philip E. Hulme, Shyama Pagad, Jan Pergl & Jonathan M. Jeschke
1. Preventing the arrival of invasive alien species (IAS) is a major priority in managing biological invasions. However, information on introduction pathways is currently scattered across many databases that often use different categorisations to describe similar pathways. This hampers the identification and prioritisation of pathways in order to meet the main targets of recent environmental policies. 2. Therefore, we integrate pathway information from two major IAS databases, IUCN's Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) and the...

Data from: Guppies occupy consistent positions in social networks: mechanisms and consequences

Stefan Krause, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Indar W. Ramnarine, James E. Herbert-Read, Romain J.G. Clément & Jens Krause
The social network approach has focused increasing attention on the complex web of relationships found in animal groups and populations. As such, network analysis has been used frequently to identify the role that particular individuals play in their social interactions and this approach has led to the question of whether, and in what context, individuals consistently occupy certain positions within their network. Here we investigated the social networks of guppies, Poecilia reticulata, in the wild...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    19
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • University of Sydney
    2
  • University of Applied Sciences
    2
  • Freie Universität Berlin
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of the West Indies
    1
  • North West Agriculture and Forestry University
    1