7 Works

Fish abundance data in forest steppe and grassland river networks in Mongolia

Alain Maasri, Mark Pyron, Emily Arsenault, James Thorp, Bud Mendsaikhan, Flavia Tromboni, Mario Minder, Scott Kenner, John Costello, Sudeep Chandra, Amarbat Otgonganbat & Bazartseren Boldgiv
Fish abundance data (fish per m) collected during the MACRO project in Mongolia. We collected fish assemblages in river networks of two different ecoregions, the Forest Steppe (FS) and Grassland (G), in 2017 and 2019.

Rethinking megafauna

Marcos Moleón, José Sánchez-Zapata, José Donázar, Eloy Revilla, Berta Martín-López, Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas, Wayne Getz, Zebensui Morales-Reyes, Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, Larry Crowder, Mauro Galetti, Manuela González-Suárez, Fengzhi He, Pedro Jordano, Rebecca Lewison, Robin Naidoo, Norman Owen-Smith, Nuria Selva, Jens-Christian Svenning, José Tella, Christiane Zarfl, Sonja Jähnig, Matt Hayward, Søren Faurby, Nuria García … & Klement Tochner
Concern for megafauna is increasing among scientists and non-scientists. Many studies have emphasized that megafauna play prominent ecological roles and provide important ecosystem services to humanity. But, what precisely are “megafauna”? Here we critically assess the concept of megafauna and propose a goal-oriented framework for megafaunal research. First, we review definitions of megafauna and analyze associated terminology in the scientific literature. Second, we conduct a survey among ecologists and paleontologists to assess the species traits...

Parasite infection disrupts escape behaviour in fish shoals

Nicolle Demandt, Marit Praetz, Ralf Kurvers, Jens Krause, Joachim Kurtz & Jörn Scharsack
Many prey species have evolved collective responses to avoid predation. They rapidly transfer information about potential predators to trigger and coordinate escape waves. Predation avoidance behaviour is often manipulated by trophically transmitted parasites, to facilitate their transmission to the next host. We hypothesised that the presence of infected, behaviourally altered individuals might disturb the spread of escape waves. We used the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus, which increases risk-taking behaviour and decrease social responsiveness of its host,...

Size-selective mortality induces evolutionary changes in group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a fish

Valerio Sbragaglia, Valerio Sbragaglia, Jose Fernando López-Olmeda, Elena Frigato, Cristiano Bertolucci & Robert Arlinghaus
1. Intensive and trait-selective mortality of fish and wildlife can cause evolutionary changes in a range of life-history and behavioral traits. These changes might in turn alter the circadian system due to coevolutionary mechanisms or correlated selection responses both at behavioral and molecular levels, with knock-on effects on daily physiological processes and behavioral outputs. 2. We examined the evolutionary impact of size-selective harvesting on group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a model fish...

An unbiased molecular approach using 3’UTRs resolves the avian family-level tree of life

Heiner Kuhl, Carolina Frankl-Vilches, Antje Bakker, Gerald Mayr, Gerhard Nikolaus, Stefan Boerno, Sven Klages, Bernd Timmermann & Manfred Gahr
Presumably, due to a rapid early diversification, major parts of the higher-level phylogeny of birds are still resolved controversially in different analyses or are considered unresolvable. To address this problem, we produced an avian tree of life, which includes molecular sequences of one or several species of ∼ 90% of the currently recognized family-level taxa (429 species, 379 genera) including all 106 for the non-passerines and 115 for the passerines (Passeriformes). The unconstrained analyses of...

Data from: Behavioural and fitness effects of translocation to a novel environment: whole-lake experiments in two aquatic top predators

Christopher Monk, Bernard Chéret, Philipp Czapla, Daniel Hühn, Thomas Klefoth, Erik Eschbach, Robert Hagemann & Robert Arlinghaus
Translocation into a novel environment through common fisheries-management practices, such as fish stocking, provides opportunities to study behavioural and fitness impacts of translocations at realistic ecological scales. The process of stocking, as well as the unfamiliarity with novel ecological conditions and the interactions with resident fish may affect translocated individuals, leading to alterations of behaviours and causing fitness impacts. Our objectives were to investigate how aquatic top-predators behaviourally establish themselves and compete with resident individuals...

Personality driven life-history trade-offs differ in two sub-populations of free ranging predators

Félicie Dhellemmes, Jean-Sebastien Finger, Matthew Smukall, Samuel Gruber, Tristan Guttridge, Kate Laskowski & Jens Krause
1) Consistent individual differences in behaviour (i.e. personality) can be explained in an evolutionary context if they are favoured by life-history trade-offs as conceptualized in the pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis. Theory predicts that faster growing individuals suffer higher mortality and that this trade-off is mediated through exploration/risk-taking personality, but empirical support for this remains limited and ambiguous. Equivocal support to the POLS hypothesis suggests that the link between life-history and personality may only emerge under...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    7
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • Bangor University
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Ball State University
    1
  • Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut
    1