46 Works

Data from: Expression of parasite genetic variation changes over the course of infection: implications of within-host dynamics for the evolution of virulence

Melanie Clerc, D. Ebert & M. D. Hall
How infectious disease agents interact with their host changes during the course of infection and can alter the expression of disease-related traits. Yet by measuring parasite life-history traits at one or few moments during infection, studies have overlooked the impact of variable parasite growth trajectories on disease evolution. Here we show that infection-age-specific estimates of host and parasite fitness components can reveal new insight into the evolution of parasites. We do so by characterizing the...

Data from: Regional heritability mapping method helps explain missing heritability of blood lipid traits in isolated populations

Masoud Shirali, Ricardo Pong-Wong, Pau Navarro, Sara Knott, Caroline Hayward, Veronique Vitart, Igor Rudan, Harry Campbell, Nicholas Hastie, Alan Wright & Christopher Haley
Single single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genome-wide association studies (SSGWAS) may fail to identify loci with modest effects on a trait. The recently developed regional heritability mapping (RHM) method can potentially identify such loci. In this study, RHM was compared with the SSGWAS for blood lipid traits (high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG)). Data comprised 2246 adults from isolated populations genotyped using ~300 000 SNP arrays. The results...

Data from: RAD-mapping reveals an evolving, polymorphic and fuzzy boundary of a plant pseudoautosomal region

Suo Qiu, Roberta Bergero, Sara Guirao-Rico, Jose L. Campos, Timothée Cezard, Karim Gharbi & Deborah Charlesworth
How loss of genetic exchanges (recombination) evolves between sex chromosomes is a long-standing question. Suppressed recombination may evolve when a sexually antagonistic (SA) polymorphism occurs in a partially sex-linked, “pseudo-autosomal’ region (or “PAR”), maintaining allele frequency differences between the two sexes, and creating selection for closer linkage with the fully sex-linked region of the Y chromosome in XY systems, or the W in ZW sex chromosome systems. Most evidence consistent with the SA polymorphism hypothesis...

Data from: Low but significant genetic differentiation underlies biologically meaningful phenotypic divergence in a large Atlantic salmon population

Tutku Aykanat, Susan E. Johnston, Eero Niemelä, Panu Orell, Jaakko Erkinaro & Craig R. Primmer
Despite decades of research assessing the genetic structure of natural populations, the biological meaning of low yet significant genetic divergence often remains unclear due to a lack of associated phenotypic and ecological information. At the same time, structured populations with low genetic divergence and overlapping boundaries can potentially provide excellent models to study adaptation and reproductive isolation in cases where high-resolution genetic markers and relevant phenotypic and life history information are available. Here, we combined...

Data from: Are molecular markers useful predictors of adaptive potential?

Elizabeth A. Mittell, Shinichi Nakagawa & Jarrod D. Hadfield
Estimates of molecular genetic variation are often used as a cheap and simple surrogate for a population's adaptive potential, yet empirical evidence suggests they are unlikely to be a valid proxy. However, this evidence is based on molecular genetic variation poorly predicting estimates of adaptive potential rather than how well it predicts true values. As a consequence, the relationship has been systematically underestimated and the precision with which it could be measured severely overstated. By...

Data from: Integrated radar and lidar analysis reveals extensive loss of remaining intact forest on Sumatra 2007–2010

Murray B. Collins & Edward T. A. Mitchard
Forests with high above ground biomass (AGB), including those growing on peat swamps, have historically not been thought suitable for biomass mapping and change detection using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). However, by integrating L-band (λ = 0.23 m) SAR with lidar data from the ALOS and ICESat earth-observing satellites respectively, and 56 forest plots, we were able to create a forest biomass and change map for a 10.7 Mha section of eastern Sumatra that still...

Data from: How integrated are behavioural and endocrine stress response traits? A repeated measures approach to testing the stress coping style model

Kay Boulton, Elsa Couto, Andrew J. Grimmer, Ryan L. Earley, Adelino V.M. Canario, Alastair J. Wilson, Craig A. Walling & Adelino V. M. Canario
It is widely expected that physiological and behavioral stress responses will be integrated within divergent stress-coping styles (SCS) and that these may represent opposite ends of a continuously varying reactive–proactive axis. If such a model is valid, then stress response traits should be repeatable and physiological and behavioral responses should also change in an integrated manner along a major axis of among-individual variation. While there is some evidence of association between endocrine and behavioral stress...

Data from: State-dependent cooperation in burying beetles: parents adjust their contribution towards care based on both their own and their partner’s size

Natalia Pilakouta, Jon Richardson & Per T. Smiseth
Handicapping experiments on species with biparental care show that a focal parent increases its contribution when its partner is handicapped. Such results are interpreted as evidence for negotiation, whereby each parent adjusts its amount of care to that of its partner. However, it is currently unclear whether the focal parent responds to a change in its handicapped partner's behaviour or state. To address this gap, we conducted an experiment on the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides...

Data from: Drug repurposing: a systematic approach to evaluate candidate oral neuroprotective interventions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

Hanna M. Vesterinen, Peter Connick, Cadi M. J. Irvine, Emily S. Sena, Kieren J. Egan, Gary G. Carmichael, Afiyah Tariq, Sue Pavitt, Jeremy Chattaway, Malcolm Robert Macleod, Siddharthan Chandran & Jeremy Chataway
Objective: To develop and implement an evidence based framework to select, from drugs already licenced, candidate oral neuroprotective drugs to be tested in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Design: Systematic review of clinical studies of oral putative neuroprotective therapies in MS and four other neurodegenerative diseases with shared pathological features, followed by systematic review and meta-analyses of the in vivo experimental data for those interventions. We presented summary data to an international multi-disciplinary committee, which assessed...

Data from: Genotypic diversity and differentiation among populations of two benthic freshwater diatoms as revealed by microsatellites

Pieter Vanormelingen, Katharine M. Evans, David G. Mann, Stacey Lance, Ann-Eline Debeer, Sofie D'Hondt, Tine Verstraete, Luc De Meester & Wim Vyverman
Given their large population sizes and presumed high dispersal capacity, protists are expected to exhibit homogeneous population structure over large spatial scales. On the other hand, the fragmented and short-lived nature of the lentic freshwater habitats that many protists inhabit promotes strong population differentiation. We used microsatellites in two benthic freshwater diatoms, Eunotia bilunaris ‘robust’ and Sellaphora capitata, sampled from within a pond and connected ponds, through isolated ponds from the same region to western...

Data from: Growth responses of a green alga to multiple environmental drivers

Georgina L. Brennan & Sinead Collins
One feature of global change is that biota must respond not to single, but to multiple environmental drivers. By growing a model photosynthetic microbe in environments containing between one and eight different drivers, including changes in CO2, temperature, and pH, in different combinations, we show that the number as well as the identities of drivers explain shifts in population growth rates. This is because the biotic response to multiple environmental drivers depends on the response...

Data from: Unified pre- and postsynaptic long-term plasticity enables reliable and flexible learning

Rui Ponte Costa, Robert C. Froemke, Per Jesper Sjöström & Mark C. W. Van Rossum
Although it is well known that long-term synaptic plasticity can be expressed both pre- and postsynaptically, the functional consequences of this arrangement have remained elusive. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity with both pre- and postsynaptic expression develops receptive fields with reduced variability and improved discriminability compared to postsynaptic plasticity alone. These long-term modifications in receptive field statistics match recent sensory perception experiments. Moreover, learning with this form of plasticity leaves a hidden postsynaptic memory trace...

Data from: Concordance of bacterial communities of two tick species and blood of their shared rodent host

Evelyn C. Rynkiewicz, Chris Hemmerich, Clay Fuqua, Keith Clay & Douglas B. Rusch
High-throughput sequencing is revealing that most macro-organisms house diverse microbial communities. Of particular interest are disease vectors whose microbiome could potentially affect pathogen transmission and vector competence. We investigated bacterial community composition and diversity of the ticks Dermacentor variabilis (n = 68) and Ixodes scapularis (n = 15) and blood of their shared rodent host, Peromyscus leucopus (n = 45) to quantify bacterial diversity and concordance. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified from genomic DNA...

Data from: High levels of interspecific gene flow in an endemic cichlid fish adaptive radiation from an extreme lake environment

Antonia G. P. Ford, Kanchon K. Dasmahapatra, Lukas Rüber, Karim Gharbi, Timothée Cezard & Julia J. Day
Studying recent adaptive radiations in isolated insular systems avoids complicating causal events and thus may offer clearer insight into mechanisms generating biological diversity. Here, we investigate evolutionary relationships and genomic differentiation within the recent radiation of Alcolapia cichlid fish that exhibit extensive phenotypic diversification, and which are confined to the extreme soda lakes Magadi and Natron in East Africa. We generated an extensive RAD data set of 96 individuals from multiple sampling sites and found...

Data from: The relative efficiency of modular and non-modular networks of different size

Colin R. Tosh & Luke McNally
Most biological networks are modular but previous work with small model networks has indicated that modularity does not necessarily lead to increased functional efficiency. Most biological networks are large, however, and here we examine the relative functional efficiency of modular and non-modular neural networks at a range of sizes. We conduct a detailed analysis of efficiency in networks of two size classes: ‘small’ and ‘large’, and a less detailed analysis across a range of network...

Data from: Maintenance of species boundaries in a Neotropical radiation of Begonia

Alex D. Twyford, Catherine A. Kidner & Richard A. Ennos
A major goal of evolutionary biology is to determine the mechanisms generating biodiversity. In Begonia, one of the largest plant genera (1900+ species), it has been postulated that the high number of endemic species is a by-product of low gene flow among populations, which predisposes the group to speciation. However, this model of divergence requires that reproductive barriers accumulate rapidly among diverging species that overlap in their geographic ranges, otherwise speciation will be opposed by...

Data from: The kinetochore prevents centromere-proximal crossover recombination during meiosis

Nadine Vincenten, Lisa-Marie Kuhl, Isabel Lam, Ashwini Oke, Alastair R. W. Kerr, Andreas Hochwagen, Jennifer C. Fung, Scott Keeney, Gerben Vader & Adèle L. Marston
During meiosis, crossover recombination is essential to link homologous chromosomes and drive 22 faithful chromosome segregation. Crossover recombination is non-random across the genome, 23 and centromere-proximal crossovers are associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy, 24 including Trisomy 21 in humans. Here, we identify the conserved Ctf19/CCAN kinetochore sub- 25 complex as a major factor that minimizes potentially deleterious centromere-proximal crossovers 26 in budding yeast. We uncover multi-layered suppression of pericentromeric recombination by the 27...

Data from: Parental age influences offspring telomere loss

Britt J. Heidinger, Katherine A. Herborn, Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Winnie Boner, Sarah Burthe, Mark Newell, Sarah Wanless, Francis Daunt, Pat Monaghan & Hanna M.V. Granroth-Wilding
The age of the parents at the time of offspring production can influence offspring longevity, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The effect of parental age on offspring telomere dynamics (length and loss rate) is one mechanism that could be important in this context. Parental age might influence the telomere length that offspring inherit or age-related differences in the quality of parental care could influence the rate of offspring telomere loss. However, these routes...

Data from: Existing infection facilitates establishment and density of malaria parasites in their mosquito vector

Laura C. Pollitt, Joshua T. Bram, Simon Blanford, Matthew J. Jones & Andrew F. Read
Very little is known about how vector-borne pathogens interact within their vector and how this impacts transmission. Here we show that mosquitoes can accumulate mixed strain malaria infections after feeding on multiple hosts. We found that parasites have a greater chance of establishing and reach higher densities if another strain is already present in a mosquito. Mixed infections contained more parasites but these larger populations did not have a detectable impact on vector survival. Together...

Data from: Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures

Ida E. Bailey, André Backes, Patrick T. Walsh, Kate V. Morgan, Simone L. Meddle & Susan D. Healy
In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual...

Data from: Age, oxidative stress exposure and fitness in a long-lived seabird

Katherine A. Herborn, Francis Daunt, Britt J. Heidinger, Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Sarah J. Burthe, Mark A. Newell & Pat Monaghan
The need to manage exposure to oxidative stress, which can damage macromolecules, is thought to influence the resolution of life history trade-offs. Oxidative damage is expected to increase with age as a consequence of changes in the optimal investment in defences or repair, and/or because of senescence in antioxidant defence systems, though the pattern might differ between short and long-lived species. However, data on age related changes in damage levels in wild populations are rare....

Data from: Genome-wide tests for introgression between cactophilic Drosophila implicate a role of inversions during speciation

Konrad Lohse, Magnus Clarke, Michael G. Ritchie & William J. Etges
Models of speciation-with-gene-flow have shown that the reduction in recombination between alternative chromosome arrangements can facilitate the fixation of locally adaptive genes in the face of gene flow and contribute to speciation. However, it has proven frustratingly difficult to show empirically that inversions have reduced gene flow and arose during or shortly after the onset of species divergence rather than represent ancestral polymorphisms. Here we present an analysis of whole genome data from a pair...

Data from: Contrasting responses of male and female foraging effort to year-round wind conditions

Sue Lewis, Richard A. Phillips, Sarah J. Burthe, Sarah Wanless & Francis Daunt
1. There is growing interest in the effects of wind on wild animals, given evidence that wind speeds are increasing and becoming more variable in some regions, particularly at temperate latitudes. Wind may alter movement patterns or foraging ability, with consequences for energy budgets and, ultimately, demographic rates. 2. These effects are expected to vary among individuals due to intrinsic factors such as sex, age or feeding proficiency. Furthermore, this variation is predicted to become...

Data from: Conflict of interest and signal interference lead to the breakdown of honest signalling

Roman Popat, Eric Pollitt, Freya J. G. Harrison, Hardeep Naghra, Kar-Wai Hong, Kok-Gan Chan, Ashleigh S. Griffin, Paul Williams, Sam P. Brown, Stuart A. West, Stephen P. Diggle, Eric J. G. Pollitt & Freya Harrison
Animals use signals to coordinate a wide range of behaviours, from feeding offspring to predator avoidance. This poses an evolutionary problem, because individuals could potentially signal dishonestly to coerce others into behaving in ways that benefit the signaller. Theory suggests that honest signalling is favoured when individuals share a common interest and signals carry reliable information. Here, we exploit the opportunities offered by bacterial signalling, to test these predictions with an experimental evolution approach. We...

Data from: Repeatability of adaptation in experimental populations of different sizes

Josianne Lachapelle, Joshua Reid & Nick Colegrave
The degree to which evolutionary trajectories and outcomes are repeatable across independent populations depends on the relative contribution of selection, chance and history. Population size has been shown theoretically and empirically to affect the amount of variation that arises among independent populations adapting to the same environment. Here, we measure the contribution of selection, chance and history in different-sized experimental populations of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii adapting to a high salt environment to determine...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    46

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    46

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    46
  • University of Glasgow
    5
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    4
  • University of St Andrews
    3
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • New York University
    2
  • McGill University
    2
  • University of Leeds
    2
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    2