49 Works

Data from: Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico

Ignacio Mena, Martha I. Nelson, Francisco Quezada-Monroy, Jayeeta Dutta, Refugio Cortes-Fernández, J. Horacio Lara-Puente, Felipa Castro-Peralta, Luis F. Cunha, Nídia Sequeira-Trovão, Bernardo Lozano-Dubernard, Andrew Rambaut, Harm Van Bakel & Adolfo García-Sastre
Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of...

Data from: Comparative analysis of Begonia plastid genomes and their utility for species-level phylogenetics

Catherine Kidner, Nicola Harrison, Richard Harrison, Richard J. Harrison & Catherine A. Kidner
Recent, rapid radiations make species-level phylogenetics difficult to resolve. We used a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing approach to identify informative genomic regions to resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels in Begonia from a survey of sixteen species. A long-range PCR method was used to generate draft plastid genomes to provide a strong phylogenetic backbone, identify fast evolving regions and provide informative molecular markers for species-level phylogenetic studies in Begonia.

Data from: Cohort variation in individual body mass dissipates with age in large herbivores

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Steve Albon, Steeve D. Côté, Joseph M. Craine, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Mathieu Garel, Phyllis Lee, Cynthia Moss, Daniel H. Nussey, Fanie Pelletier, Audun Stien & Torkild Tveraa
Environmental conditions experienced during early growth and development markedly shape phenotypic traits. Consequently, individuals of the same cohort may show similar life-history tactics throughout life. Conditions experienced later in life, however, could fine-tune these initial differences, either increasing (cumulative effect) or decreasing (compensatory effect) the magnitude of cohort variation with increasing age. Our novel comparative analysis that quantifies cohort variation in individual body size trajectories shows that initial cohort variation dissipates throughout life, and that...

Data from: The biogeography of kin discrimination across microbial neighbourhoods

Susanne A. Kraemer, Sébastien Wielgoss, Francesca Fiegna & Gregory J. Velicer
The spatial distribution of potential interactants is critical to social evolution in all cooperative organisms. Yet the biogeography of microbial kin discrimination at the scales most relevant to social interactions is poorly understood. Here we resolve the microbiogeography of social identity and genetic relatedness in local populations of the model cooperative bacterium Myxococcus xanthus at small spatial scales, across which the potential for dispersal is high. Using two criteria of relatedness—colony-merger compatibility during cooperative motility...

Data from: Spatially coordinated dynamic gene transcription in living pituitary tissue

Karen Featherstone, Kirsty Hey, Hiroshi Momiji, Anne V. McNamara, Amanda L. Patist, Joanna Woodburn, David G. Spiller, Helen C. Christian, Alan S. McNeilly, John J. Mullins, Barbel F. Finkenstadt, David A. Rand, Michael R. H. White & Julian R. E. Davis
Transcription at individual genes in single cells is often pulsatile and stochastic. A key question emerges regarding how this behaviour contributes to tissue phenotype, but it has been a challenge to quantitatively analyse this in living cells over time, as opposed to studying snap-shots of gene expression state. We have used imaging of reporter gene expression to track transcription in living pituitary tissue. We integrated live-cell imaging data with statistical modelling for quantitative real-time estimation...

Soil dates using radiocarbon in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soil dates determined using radiocarbon in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Depth-specific soil core samples were dated using radiocarbon. Soil cores were sampled during early summer in 2013 and 2014. Each year soil cores were sampled from a peatland plateau, thawing features of the peatland plateau, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites in Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Laboratory soil incubation respiration rates from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset contains measures of laboratory soil incubation respiration rates from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Samples from soil cores were incubated in the laboratory to quantify CO2 and CH4 gas production rates at two different temperatures under both anoxic and oxic incubations. Soil cores were sampled from a peatland plateau and a thawing feature of the peatland plateau and from a unburnt and a burnt black spruce forest, and also additional sites in Yukon.

Snow Survey of Great Britain: transcribed data for Scotland, 1945 to 2007

M. Spencer
This dataset comprises observations of snowline from the Snow Survey of Great Britain (SSGB) at 140 sites across Scotland . Daily observations were made between 1945 and 2007. Observations were made by a ground observer who looked out from a given location at 0900 GMT each day and noted the elevation at which snow cover was greater than 50%. The initial aim was to 'secure representative data relating to the occurrence of snow cover at...

Campanula rotundifolia cytotype, distribution and first flowering dates

J. Wilson, A. Perry, Shepherd, M. Duran-Castillo, CE. Jeffree & S. Cavers
This dataset comprises information of location and cytotype of over 1300 samples of Campanula rotundifolia L. from the northern hemisphere (mostly from Britain and Ireland) and data from a common garden study in which British and Irish cytotypes were grown together and their flowering phenology and growth were assessed. Campanula rotundifolia L. is a widespread polyploid perennial herbaceous plant, with diploid, tetraploid, pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes.

Soil moisture profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soil moisture profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil mositure profiles were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites.

Data from: Temporal and phylogenetic evolution of the sauropod dinosaur body plan

Karl T. Bates, Philip D. Mannion, Peter L. Falkingham, Stephen L. Brusatte, John R. Hutchinson, Alexandros Otero, William I. Sellers, Corwin Sullivan, Kent A. Stevens & Vivian Allen
The colossal size and body plan of sauropod dinosaurs are unparalleled in terrestrial vertebrates. However, to date, there have been only limited attempts to examine temporal and phylogenetic patterns in the sauropod bauplan. Here, we combine three-dimensional computational models with phylogenetic reconstructions to quantify the evolution of whole-body shape and body segment properties across the sauropod radiation. Limitations associated with the absence of soft tissue preservation in fossils result in large error bars about mean...

Data from: Temporal shifts and temperature sensitivity of avian spring migratory phenology: a phylogenetic meta-analysis

Takuji Usui, Stuart H. M. Butchart & Albert B. Phillimore
There are wide reports of advances in the timing of spring migration of birds over time and in relation to rising temperatures, though phenological responses vary substantially within and among species. An understanding of the ecological, life-history and geographic variables that predict this intra- and interspecific variation can guide our projections of how populations and species are likely to respond to future climate change. Here, we conduct phylogenetic meta-analyses addressing slope estimates of the timing...

Data from: The cranial endocast of Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi) and the interrelationships of stem-group lungfishes

Alice M. Clement, Tom J. Challands, John A. Long & Per E. Ahlberg
The first virtual cranial endocast of a lungfish from the Early Devonian, Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi, is described. Dipnorhynchus, only the fourth Devonian lungfish for which a near complete cranial endocast is known, is a key taxon for clarifying primitive character states within the group. A ventrally-expanded telencephalic cavity is present in the endocast of Dipnorhynchus demonstrating that this is the primitive state for “true” Dipnoi. Dipnorhynchus also possesses a utricular recess differentiated from the sacculolagenar pouch...

Data from: Formin is associated with left-right asymmetry in the pond snail and the frog

Angus Davison, Gary S. McDowell, Jennifer M. Holden, Harriet F. Johnson, Georgios D. Koutsovoulos, M. Maureen Liu, Paco Hulpiau, Frans Van Roy, Christopher M. Wade, Ruby Banerjee, Fengtang Yang, Satoshi Chiba, John W. Davey, Daniel J. Jackson, Michael Levin & Mark L. Blaxter
While components of the pathway that establishes left-right asymmetry have been identified in diverse animals, from vertebrates to flies, it is striking that the genes involved in the first symmetry-breaking step remain wholly unknown in the most obviously chiral animals, the gastropod snails. Previously, research on snails was used to show that left-right signaling of Nodal, downstream of symmetry breaking, may be an ancestral feature of the Bilateria. Here, we report that a disabling mutation...

Data from: Para-allopatry in hybridizing fire-bellied toads (Bombina bombina and B. variegata): inference from transcriptome-wide coalescence analyses

Beate Nürnberger, Konrad Lohse, Anna Fijarczyk, Jacek M. Szymura & Mark L. Blaxter
Ancient origins, profound ecological divergence, and extensive hybridization make the fire-bellied toads Bombina bombina and B. variegata (Anura: Bombinatoridae) an intriguing test case of ecological speciation. Previous modeling has proposed that the narrow Bombina hybrid zones represent strong barriers to neutral introgression. We test this prediction by inferring the rate of gene exchange between pure populations on either side of the intensively studied Kraków transect. We developed a method to extract high confidence sets of...

Data from: Inbreeding depression by environment interactions in a free-living mammal population

Josephine M. Pemberton, Philip E. Ellis, Jill G. Pilkington & Camillo Bérénos
Experimental studies often find that inbreeding depression is more severe in harsh environments, but the few studies of in situ wild populations available to date rarely find strong support for this effect. We investigated evidence for inbreeding depression by environment interactions in nine traits in the individually monitored Soay sheep population of St Kilda, using genomic inbreeding coefficients based on 37 037 single-nucleotide polymorphism loci, and population density as an axis of environmental variation. All...

Data from: Selection on parental performance opposes selection for larger body mass in a wild population of blue tits

Caroline Elizabeth Thomson, Florian Bayer, Nicholas Crouch, Samantha Farrell, Elizabeth Heap, Elizabeth Mittell, Mar Zurita-Cassinello & Jarrod D. Hadfield
There is abundant evidence in many taxa for positive directional selection on body size, and yet little evidence for microevolutionary change. In many species, variation in body size is partly determined by the actions of parents, so a proposed explanation for stasis is the presence of a negative genetic correlation between direct and parental effects. Consequently, selecting genes for increased body size would result in a correlated decline in parental effects, reducing body size in...

Data from: The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

Nicola S. Lewis, Colin A. Russell, Tavis K. Anderson, Kathryn Berger, David F. Burke, Judith M. Fonville, Ronald A.M. Fouchier, Paul Kellam, Bjorn F. Koel, Tung Nguyen, Bundit Nuansrichy, J. S. Malik Peiris, Takehiko Saito, Gaelle Simon, Eugene Skepner, Nobuhiro Takemae, ESNIP3 Consortium, Richard J. Webby, Kristien Van Reeth, Sharon M. Brookes, Lars Larsen, Ian H. Brown, Amy L. Vincent, Pinky Langat, Filip Bielejec … & JS Malik Peiris
Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the...

Data from: Fine with heat, problems with water: microclimate alters water loss in a thermally adapted insular lizard

Anat Belasen, Kinsey Brock, Binbin Li, Dimitra Chremou, Efstratios Valakos, Panayiotis Pafilis, Barry Sinervo & Johannes Foufopoulos
Global change, including habitat isolation and climate change, has both short- and long-term impacts on wildlife populations. For example, genetic drift and inbreeding result in genetic impoverishment in small, isolated populations, while species undergo range shifts or adaptive phenotypic change in response to shifts in environmental temperatures. In this study, we utilize a model system in which Holocene landscape changes have occurred to examine long-term effects of population isolation. To examine how isolation may constrain...

Data from: Use of novel psychoactive substances by inpatients on general adult psychiatric wards

Jack L. Stanley, Daniel V. Mogford, Rebecca J. Lawrence & Stephen M. Lawrie
Objectives: Non-illicit alternatives to controlled drugs, known as Novel Psychoactive Substances (NPS) have recently risen to prominence. They are readily available with uncertain pharmacology and no widely available assay. Given that psychiatric patients are at risk of comorbid substance abuse, we hypothesized that NPS use would be present in the psychiatric population, and sought to determine its prevalence and investigate the characteristics of those who use these drugs with a retrospective review of discharge letters....

Data from: Mode of resistance to viral lysis affects host growth across multiple environments in the marine picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri

Sarah E. Heath & Sinead Collins
Viruses play important roles in population dynamics and as drivers of evolution in single-celled marine phytoplankton. Viral infection of Ostreococcus tauri often causes cell lysis, but two spontaneously arising resistance mechanisms occur: resistant cells that cannot become infected and resistant producer cells that are infected but not lysed, and which may slowly release viruses. As of yet, little is known about how consistent the effects of viruses on their hosts are across different environments. To...

Data from: The effect of dietary restriction on reproduction: a meta-analytic perspective

Joshua P. Moatt, Shinichi Nakagawa, Malgorzata Lagisz & Craig A. Walling
Background: Dietary restriction (DR), a reduction in the amount of food or particular nutrients eaten, is the most consistent environmental manipulation to extend lifespan and protect against age related diseases. Current evolutionary theory explains this effect as a shift in the resolution of the trade-off between lifespan and reproduction. However, recent studies have questioned the role of reproduction in mediating the effect of DR on longevity and no study has quantitatively investigated the effect of...

Data from: Maternal effects alter the severity of inbreeding depression in the offspring

Natalie Pilakouta & Per T. Smiseth
A maternal effect is a causal influence of the maternal phenotype on the offspring phenotype over and above any direct effects of genes. There is abundant evidence that maternal effects can have a major impact on offspring fitness. Yet, no previous study has investigated the potential role of maternal effects in influencing the severity of inbreeding depression in the offspring. Inbreeding depression is a reduction in the fitness of inbred offspring relative to outbred offspring....

Autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes (CO2) were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites.

Registration Year

  • 2016
    49

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    49

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    49
  • University of Exeter
    13
  • University of Sheffield
    12
  • University of Sussex
    10
  • University of Cambridge
    4
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Ghent University
    2
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    2
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2