35 Works

Drieschia sp. MicroCT-Scans for 3D reconstruction

Marc Christian Allentoft-Larsen, Brett C. Gonzalez, Joost Daniels, Kakani Katija, Karen Osborn & Katrine Worsaae
Annelids are predominantly found along the seafloor, but over time have colonised a vast diversity of habitats, such as the water column, where different modes of locomotion are necessary. Yet, little is known about their potential muscular adaptation to the continuously swimming required in the water column. The musculature and motility were examined for five scale worm species of Polynoidae (Aphroditiformia, Annelida) found in shallow waters, deep sea and caves that exhibit crawling, occasional swimming...

Gesiella jameensis MicroCT-scans for 3D reconstruction

Marc Christian Allentoft-Larsen, Brett C. Gonzalez, Joost Daniels, Kakani Katija, Karen Osborn & Katrine Worsaae
Annelids are predominantly found along the seafloor, but over time have colonised a vast diversity of habitats, such as the water column, where different modes of locomotion are necessary. Yet, little is known about their potential muscular adaptation to the continuously swimming required in the water column. The musculature and motility were examined for five scale worm species of Polynoidae (Aphroditiformia, Annelida) found in shallow waters, deep sea and caves that exhibit crawling, occasional swimming...

Supplementary information for integrating sequence capture and restriction-site associated DNA sequencing to resolve recent radiations of Pelagic seabirds

Joan Ferrer-Obiol, Helen F. James, R. Terry Chesser, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís, Julio Rozas, Marta Riutort & Andreanna J. Welch
The diversification of modern birds has been shaped by a number of radiations. Rapid diversification events make reconstructing the evolutionary relationships among taxa challenging due to the convoluted effects of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression. Phylogenomic datasets have the potential to detect patterns of phylogenetic incongruence, and to address their causes. However, the footprints of ILS and introgression on sequence data can vary between different phylogenomic markers at different phylogenetic scales depending on factors...

The genome of a daddy-long-legs (Opiliones) illuminates the evolution of arachnid appendages

Guilherme Gainett, Vanessa L. González, Jesús Ballesteros, Emily V. W. Setton, Caitlin M. Baker, Leonardo Barolo Gargiulo, Carlos E. Santibáñez-López, Jonathan A. Coddington & Prashant P. Sharma
Chelicerate arthropods exhibit dynamic genome evolution, with ancient whole genome duplication (WGD) events affecting several orders. Yet, genomes remain unavailable for a number of poorly studied orders, such as Opiliones (daddy-long-legs), which has hindered comparative study. We assembled the first opilionid draft genome for the species Phalangium opilio, which bears elongate, prehensile appendages, made possible by numerous distal articles called tarsomeres. Here, we show that the genome of P. opilio exhibits a single Hox cluster...

Harmothoe imbricata MicroCT-scans for 3D reconstruction

Marc Christian Allentoft-Larsen, Brett C. Gonzalez, Joost Daniels, Kakani Katija, Karen Osborn & Katrine Worsaae
Annelids are predominantly found along the seafloor, but over time have colonised a vast diversity of habitats, such as the water column, where different modes of locomotion are necessary. Yet, little is known about their potential muscular adaptation to the continuously swimming required in the water column. The musculature and motility were examined for five scale worm species of Polynoidae (Aphroditiformia, Annelida) found in shallow waters, deep sea and caves that exhibit crawling, occasional swimming...

Data from: The role of taxonomic expertise in interpretation of metabarcoding studies

Paula Pappalardo, Allen G. Collins, Katrina M. Pagenkopp Lohan, Kate M. Hanson, Sarit B. Truskey, William Jaeckle, Cheryl Lewis Ames, Jessica A. Goodheart, Stephanie L. Bush, Leann M. Biancani, Ellen E. Strong, Michael Vecchione, M. G. Harasewych, Karen Reed, Chan Lin, Elise Hartil, Jessica Whelpley, Jamie Blumberg, Kenan Matterson, Niamh E. Redmond, Allison Becker, Michael J. Boyle & Karen J. Osborn
The performance of DNA metabarcoding approaches for characterizing biodiversity can be influenced by multiple factors. Here we used morphological assessment of taxa in zooplankton samples to develop a large barcode database and to assess the congruence of taxonomic identification with metabarcoding under different conditions. We analyzed taxonomic assignment of metabarcoded samples using two genetic markers (COI, 18S V1-2), two types of clustering into molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs, ZOTUs), and three methods for taxonomic assignment...

What does it mean to be wild? Assessing human influence on the environments of nonhuman primate specimens in museum collections

Andrea Eller, Stephanie Canington, Sana Saiyed, Rita Austin, Courtney Hofman & Sabrina Sholts
Natural history collections are often thought to represent environments in a pristine natural state, free from human intervention – the so-called “wild”. In this study, we aim to assess the level of human influence represented by natural history collections of wild-collected primates over 120 years at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). Our sample consisted of 875 catarrhine primate specimens in NMNH collections, representing 13 genera collected in 39 countries from 1882...

Isotopic data of kelps and particulate organic matter (POM) from relevant studies and estimated contributions of kelps to local consumers

Emma Elliott Smith & Michael Fox
Kelp forests are highly productive coastal habitats that serve as biodiversity hotspots and provide valuable ecosystem services. Despite being one the largest marine biomes, kelp forests have been drastically understudied relative to other marine systems. Notably, while the role of kelp as habitat-forming, or ‘foundation species’, is well-documented, a comprehensive understanding of kelp forest food web structure is lacking, particularly regarding the importance of kelp-derived energy/nutrients to consumers. Here, we provide a biogeographic perspective on...

Key roles for the freezing line and disturbance in driving the low plant species richness of temperate regions

Suresh K Rana, Alexander E White & Trevor D Price
Aim: At the macroscale, climate strongly correlates with species richness gradients, resulting from differences in in-situ diversification and dispersal. One historical explanation for the pattern is that regions spanning temperate climates contain few species because past disturbances have generated high extinction rates, and species from tropical regions are unable to easily colonize temperate regions. We test these postulates for Himalayan plants, which span subtropical to temperate climates over steep elevational gradients. Location: Himalaya Time period:...

Evolutionary modularity, integration and disparity in an accretionary skeleton: Analysis of venerid Bivalvia

Stewart Edie, Safia Khouja, Katie Collins, Nicholas Crouch & David Jablonski
Modular evolution, the relatively independent evolution of body parts, may promote high morphological disparity in a clade. Conversely, integrated evolution via the stronger covariation of parts may limit disparity. However, integration can also promote high disparity by channeling morphological evolution along lines of least resistance—a process that may be particularly important in the accumulation of disparity among organisms with accretionary growth, as in many invertebrate systems. We use a time-calibrated phylogenetic hypothesis and high-density, 3D...

DNA metabarcoding marker choice skews perception of marine eukaryotic biodiversity

Jordan M Casey, Emma Ransome, Allen G Collins, Angka Mahardini, Eka M Kurniasih, Andrianus Sembiring, Nina M D Schiettekatte, Ni Kadek Dita Cahyani, Aji Wahyu Anggoro, Mikaela Moore, Abby Uehling, Mahdi Belcaid, Paul H Barber, Jonathan B Geller & Christopher P Meyer
DNA metabarcoding is an increasingly popular technique to investigate biodiversity; however, many methodological unknowns remain, especially concerning the biases resulting from marker choice. Regions of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 18S rDNA (18S) genes are commonly employed “universal” markers for eukaryotes, but the extent of taxonomic biases introduced by these markers and how such biases may impact metabarcoding performance is not well quantified. Here, focusing on macro-eukaryotes, we use standardized sampling from...

Base-substitution mutation rate across the nuclear genome of Alpheus snapping shrimp and the timing of isolation by the Isthmus of Panama

Katherine Silliman, Jane Indorf, Nancy Knowlton, William Browne & Carla Hurt
The formation of the Isthmus of Panama and final closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS) provides an independent calibration point for examining the rate of DNA substitutions. This vicariant event has been widely used to estimate the substitution rate across mitochondrial genomes and to date evolutionary events in other taxonomic groups. Nuclear sequence data is increasingly being used to complement mitochondrial datasets for phylogenetic and evolutionary investigations; these studies would benefit from information regarding...

Quaternary equatorial Atlantic deep-sea ostracodes: evidence for a distinct tropical fauna in the deep sea

Moriaki Yasuhara, Hisayo Okahashi, Huai-Hsuan May Huang, Yuanyuan Hong, Hokuto Iwatani, Rachel Chu & Gene Hunt
Low latitude, deep-sea faunas remain poorly understood and described. Here we systematically describe Quaternary deep-sea ostracodes from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 925 (Ceara Rise; 4°12.2'N, 43°29.3'W; 3040 m water depth) in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Twenty-six genera and 52 species were examined and illustrated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images. Six new species are described herein: Pseudocythere spinae, Hemiparacytheridea zarikiani, Pedicythere canis, Xylocythere denticulata, Paracytherois obtusa, and Poseidonamicus sculptus. The results show that...

Speciation in the abyss - genomics and morphology reveal a new species of beaked whale

Emma L. Carroll, Michael R. McGowen, Morgan L. McCarthy, Felix G. Marx, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Merel L. Dalebout, Sascha Dreyer, Oscar E. Gaggiotti, Sabine S. Hansen, Anton Van Helden, Aubrie B. Onoufriou, Robin W. Baird, C. Scott Baker, Simon Berrow, Danielle Cholewiak, Diane Claridge, Rochelle Constantine, Nicholas J. Davison, Catarina Eira, R. Ewan Fordyce, John Gatesy, G. J. Greg Hofmeyr, Vidal Martin, James G. Mead, Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni … & Morten T. Olsen
Earth’s deep oceans remains less well understood than the surface of Mars. Beaked whales (ziphiids) are among the most visible inhabitants of the abyss, due to their large size and worldwide distribution, yet their diversity and ecology remain obscure. We combine genomic and morphometric analyses to reveal a new Southern Hemisphere ziphiid species, Ramari’s beaked whale, Mesoplodon eueu, whose name is linked to the Indigenous people of the lands from which the species holotype and...

Data and scripts from: Phylogenomic analysis points to a South American origin of Manihot and illuminates the primary gene pool of cassava

Marcelo F. Simon, J. Moises Mendoza F., Márcio Lacerda Lopes Martins, Sergei V. Drovetski, Natalia A. S. Przelomska, Hope Loiselle, Taciana B. Cavalcanti, Peter W. Inglis, Natalie G. Mueller, Robin G. Allaby, Fábio De Oliveira Freitas & Logan Kistler
The genus Manihot, with around 120 known species, is native to a wide range of habitats and regions in the tropical and subtropical Americas. Its high species richness and recent diversification only ~6Mya have significantly complicated previous phylogenetic analyses. Several basic elements of Manihot evolutionary history therefore remain unresolved. Here, we conduct a comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of Manihot, focusing on exhaustive sampling of South American taxa. We find that two recently described species from northeast...

Capturing single-copy nuclear genes, organellar genomes, and nuclear ribosomal DNA from deep genome skimming data for plant phylogenetics: A case study in Vitaceae

Bin-Bin Liu, Zhi-Yao Ma, Chen Ren, Richard Hodel, Miao Sun, Xiu-Qun Liu, Guang-Ning Liu, De-Yuan Hong, Elizabeth Zimmer & Jun Wen
With the decreasing cost and availability of many newly developed bioinformatics pipelines, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized plant systematics in recent years. Genome skimming has been widely used to obtain high-copy fractions of the genomes, including plastomes, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA). In this study, through simulations, we evaluated the optimal (minimum) sequencing depth and performance for recovering single-copy nuclear genes (SCNs) from genome skimming data, by subsampling genome resequencing data and...

Phylogenomics, origin and diversification of anthozoans (Phylum Cnidaria)

Catherine McFadden, Andrea Quattrini, Mercer Brugler, Peter Cowman, Luisa Dueñas, Marcelo Kitahara, David Paz-García, James Reimer & Estefania Rodríguez
Anthozoan cnidarians (corals and sea anemones) include some of the world's most important foundation species, capable of building massive reef complexes that support entire ecosystems. Although previous molecular phylogenetic analyses have revealed widespread homoplasy of the morphological characters traditionally used to define orders and families of anthozoans, analyses using mitochondrial genes or rDNA have failed to resolve many key nodes in the phylogeny. With a fully resolved, time-calibrated phylogeny for 234 species constructed from hundreds...

Phylogenomic analyses of the East Asian endemic Abelia (Caprifoliaceae) shed insights into the temporal and spatial diversification history with widespread hybridization

Qing-Hui Sun, Diego F. Morales-Briones, Hong-Xin Wang, Jacob Landis, Jun Wen & Hua-Feng Wang
• Background and Aims Abelia (Caprifoliaceae) is a small genus with five species, including one man-made hybrid and several natural hybrids. The genus has a discontinuous distribution in Mainland China, the Taiwan Island, and the Ryukyu Islands, providing a model system to explore mechanisms of species dispersal in the East Asian flora. However, the current phylogenetic relationships within Abelia remain uncertain. • Methods In this study, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships within Abelia using nuclear...

Sympatrically-breeding congeneric seabirds (Stercorarius spp.) from Arctic Canada migrate to four oceans

Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Paul Woodard, Mark Mallory & Jennie Rausch
Polar systems of avian migration remain unpredictable. For seabirds nesting in the Nearctic, it is often difficult to predict which of the world’s oceans birds will migrate to after breeding. Here we report on three related seabird species that migrated across four oceans following sympatric breeding at a central Canadian high Arctic nesting location. Using telemetry we tracked pomarine jaeger (Stercorarius pomarinus, n=1) to the Arctic Ocean to the western Pacific Ocean; parasitic jaeger (S....

Noachian Bedrock at Endeavour Crater: Data Tables, Statistical Modeling and Locator Images

David Mittlefehldt, Ralf Gellert, Scott VanBommel, Raymond Arvidson, James W. Ashley, Benton Clark, Larry S. Crumpler, William H. Farrand, Matthew Golombek, John Grant, Richard Morris & Christian Schröder

Data from: Phylogeny of gracillariid leaf-mining moths: evolution of larval behaviour inferred from phylogenomic and Sanger data

Xuankun Li, Ryan St Laurent, Chandra Earl, Camiel Doorenweerd, Erik Van Nieukerken, Don Davis, Atsushi Kawakita, Shigeki Kobayashi, Andreas Zwick, Carlos Lopez-Vaamonde, Issei Ohshima & Akito Kawahara
Gracillariidae is the most taxonomically diverse cosmopolitan leaf-mining moth family, consisting of nearly 2000 named species in 105 described genera, classified into eight extant subfamilies. The majority of gracillariid species are internal plant feeders as larvae, creating mines and galls in plant tissue. Despite their diversity and ecological adaptations, their phylogenetic relationships, especially at the subfamily level, remain largely uncertain. Genomic data (83 taxa and 589 loci) were integrated with Sanger data (130 taxa and...

Evolutionary tradeoffs between male secondary sexual traits revealed by a phylogeny of the hyperdiverse tribe Eumaeini (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

Wendy A. Valencia-Montoya, Tiago B. Quental, João Filipe R. Tonini, Gerard Talavera, James D. Crall, Gerardo Lamas, Robert C. Busby, Ana Paula S. Carvalho, Ana B. Morais, Nicolás Oliveira Mega, Helena Piccoli Romanowski, Marjorie A. Liénard, Shayla Salzman, Melissa R. L. Whitaker, Akito Y. Kawahara, David J. Lohman, Robert K. Robbins & Naomi E. Pierce
Male butterflies in the hyperdiverse tribe Eumaeini possess an unusually complex and diverse repertoire of secondary sexual characteristics involved in pheromone production and dissemination. Maintaining multiple sexually selected traits is likely to be metabolically costly, potentially resulting in trade-offs in the evolution of male signals. However, a phylogenetic framework to test hypotheses regarding the evolution and maintenance of male sexual traits in Eumaeini has been lacking. Here, we infer a comprehensive, time-calibrated phylogeny from 379...

Branchipolynoe sp. MicroCT-Scans for 3D reconstruction

Marc Christian Allentoft-Larsen, Brett C. Gonzalez, Joost Daniels, Kakani Katija, Karen Osborn & Katrine Worsaae
Annelids are predominantly found along the seafloor, but over time have colonised a vast diversity of habitats, such as the water column, where different modes of locomotion are necessary. Yet, little is known about their potential muscular adaptation to the continuously swimming required in the water column. The musculature and motility were examined for five scale worm species of Polynoidae (Aphroditiformia, Annelida) found in shallow waters, deep sea and caves that exhibit crawling, occasional swimming,...

Macellicephala longipalpa MicroCT-scans for 3d reconstruction

Marc Christian Allentoft-Larsen, Brett C. Gonzalez, Joost Daniels, Kakani Katija, Karen Osborn & Katrine Worsaae
Annelids are predominantly found along the seafloor, but over time have colonised a vast diversity of habitats, such as the water column, where different modes of locomotion are necessary. Yet, little is known about their potential muscular adaptation to the continuously swimming required in the water column. The musculature and motility were examined for five scale worm species of Polynoidae (Aphroditiformia, Annelida) found in shallow waters, deep sea and caves that exhibit crawling, occasional swimming...

Environmental DNA in a global biodiversity hotspot: Lessons from coral reef fish diversity across the Indonesian archipelago

Onny Marwayana, Zachary Gold, Christopher Meyer & Paul Barber
Indonesia is the heart of the Coral Triangle, the world’s most diverse marine ecosystem. Preserving the biological and economic value of this marine biodiversity requires efficient and economical ecosystem monitoring, yet our understanding of marine biodiversity in this region remains limited. Towards this end, this study uses environmental DNA (eDNA) to survey fish communities across a well-documented biodiversity gradient in Indonesia. A total of 6,608,693 sequence reads of MiFish 12S rRNA from 39 sites spanning...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    35

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    35

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Institution
    35
  • Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
    7
  • University of Copenhagen
    7
  • University of Chicago
    3
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    2
  • Durham University
    2
  • Washington University in St. Louis
    2
  • University of Barcelona
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2