399 Works

Data from: Life history change in response to fishing and an introduced predator in the East African cyprinid Rastrineobola argentea

Diana M. T. Sharpe, Silvester B. Wandera & Lauren J. Chapman
Fishing and introduced species are among the most important stressors affecting freshwaters, and can be important selective agents. We examined the combined effects of commercial fishing and an introduced predator (Nile perch, Lates niloticus) on life history traits in an African cyprinid fish (Rastrineobola argentea) native to the Lake Victoria basin in East Africa. To understand whether these two stressors have driven shifts in life history traits of R. argentea, we tested for associations between...

Data from: Sharp genetic discontinuity across a unimodal Heliconius hybrid zone

Carlos F. Arias, Claudia Rosales, Camilo Salazar, Jully Castano, Eldredge Bermingham, Mauricio Linares & W. Owen McMillan
Hybrid zones are powerful natural systems to study evolutionary processes to gain an understanding of adaptation and speciation. In the Cauca Valley (Colombia), two butterfly races, Heliconius cydno cydnides and Heliconius cydno weymeri, meet and hybridize. We characterized this hybrid zone using a combination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences, Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLPs), microsatellites, and sequences for nuclear loci within and outside of the genomic regions that cause differences in wing color pattern. The...

Data from: The founding of Mauritian endemic coffee trees by a synchronous long-distance dispersal event

Michael D. Nowak, Benjamin C. Haller & Anne D. Yoder
The stochastic process of long-distance dispersal is the exclusive means by which plants colonize oceanic islands. Baker's rule posits that self-incompatible plant lineages are unlikely to successfully colonize oceanic islands because they must achieve a coordinated long-distance dispersal of sufficiently numerous individuals to establish an outcrossing founder population. Here, we show for the first time that Mauritian Coffea species are self-incompatible and thus represent an exception to Baker's rule. The genus Coffea (Rubiaceae) is composed...

Data from: Darwin’s finches and their diet niches: the sympatric coexistence of imperfect generalists

Luis F. De León, Jeffrey Podos, Tariq Gardezi, Anthony Herrel & Andrew P. Hendry
Adaptive radiation can be strongly influenced by interspecific competition for resources, which can lead to diverse outcomes ranging from competitive exclusion to character displacement. In each case, sympatric species are expected to evolve into distinct ecological niches, such as different food types, yet this expectation is not always met when such species are examined in nature. The most common hypotheses to account for the coexistence of species with substantial diet overlap rest on temporal variation...

Data from: Phylogeography of Heliconius cydno and its closest relatives: disentangling their origin and diversification

Carlos F. Arias, Camilo Salazar, Claudia Rosales, Marcus R. Kronforst, Mauricio Linares, Eldredge Bermingham & W. Owen McMillan
The origins of phenotypic variation within mimetic Heliconius butterflies have long fascinated biologists and naturalists. However, the evolutionary processes that have generated this extraordinary diversity remain puzzling. Here we examine intraspecific variation across Heliconius cydno diversification and compare this variation to that within the closely related H. melpomene and H. timareta radiations. Our data, which consist of both mtDNA and genome scan from nearly 2250 AFLP loci, reveal a complex history of differentiation and admixture...

Data from: A tale of two morphs: modeling pollen transfer, magic traits, and reproductive isolation in parapatry

Benjamin C. Haller, Jurriaan M. De Vos, Barbara Keller, Andrew P. Hendry & Elena Conti
The evolution of the flower is commonly thought to have spurred angiosperm diversification. Similarly, particular floral traits might have promoted diversification within specific angiosperm clades. We hypothesize that traits promoting the precise positional transfer of pollen between flowers might promote diversification. In particular, precise pollen transfer might produce partial reproductive isolation that facilitates adaptive divergence between parapatric populations differing in their reproductive-organ positions. We investigate this hypothesis with an individual-based model of pollen transfer dynamics...

Data from: Quantitative genetic inheritance of morphological divergence in a lake-stream stickleback ecotype pair: implications for reproductive isolation

Daniel Berner, Renaud Kaeuffer, Anne-Catherine Grandchamp, Joost A. M. Raeymaekers, Katja Räsänen & Andrew P. Hendry
Ecological selection against hybrids between populations occupying different habitats might be an important component of reproductive isolation during the initial stages of speciation. The strength and directionality of this barrier to gene flow depends on the genetic architecture underlying divergence in ecologically relevant phenotypes. We here present line cross analyses of inheritance for two key foraging-related morphological traits involved in adaptive divergence between stickleback ecotypes residing parapatrically in lake and stream habitats within the Misty...

Data from: Secondary evolution of a self-incompatibility locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia

Sier-Ching Chantha, Adam C. Herman, Adrian E. Platts, Xavier Vekemans & Daniel J. Schoen
Self-incompatibility (SI) is the flowering plant reproductive system in which self pollen tube growth is inhibited, thereby preventing self-fertilization. SI has evolved independently in several different flowering plant lineages. In all Brassicaceae species in which the molecular basis of SI has been investigated in detail, the product of the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) gene functions as receptor in the initial step of the self pollen-rejection pathway, while that of the S-locus cysteine-rich (SCR) gene functions...

Data from: Predators, energetics and fitness drive neonatal reproductive failure in red squirrels

Emily K. Studd, Stan Boutin, Andrew G. McAdam, Charles J. Krebs & Murray M. Humphries
Neonatal reproductive failure should occur when energetic costs of parental investment outweigh fitness benefits. However, little is known about the drivers of neonatal reproductive failure in free ranging species experiencing continuous natural variation in predator abundance and in the energetic and fitness costs and benefits associated with parental investment. Long-term comprehensive studies are required to better understand how biotic, abiotic, and life history conditions interact to drive occurrences of reproductive failure in the wild. Using...

Data from: Reproductive sharing in relation to group and colony-level attributes in a cooperative breeding fish

Jennifer K. Hellmann, Isaac Y. Ligocki, Constance M. O'Connor, Adam R. Reddon, Kelly A. Garvy, Susan E. Marsh-Rollo, H. Lisle Gibbs, Sigal Balshine & Ian M. Hamilton
The degree to which group members share reproduction is dictated by both within-group (e.g. group size and composition) and between-group (e.g. density and position of neighbours) characteristics. While many studies have investigated reproductive patterns within social groups, few have simultaneously explored how within-group and between-group social structure influence these patterns. Here, we investigated how group size and composition, along with territory density and location within the colony, influenced parentage in 36 wild groups of a...

Data from: Mitigation of pollen limitation in the lowbush blueberry agroecosystem: effect of augmenting natural pollinators

Melissa Fulton, Linley K. Jesson, Kyle Bobiwash & Daniel J. Schoen
Growers of small fruit crops often supplement the natural pollinator community by introducing pollinators into commercial orchards and fields, but there are relatively few studies that test the extent to which such interventions increase fruit yield. To test whether plants are limited by pollen availability, inflorescences in 78 commercial lowbush blueberry fields during three years were hand-pollinated either with supplemental outcross pollen, or marked and left as controls (open-pollination). Maximum fruit set with supplemental pollination...

Data from: Revisiting Darwin’s naturalization conundrum: explaining invasion success of non-native trees and shrubs in southern Africa

Simeon Bezeng Bezeng, Jonathan T. Davies, Kowiyou Yessoufou, Olivier Maurin & Michelle Van Der Bank
1. Invasive species are detrimental ecologically and economically. Their negative impacts in Africa are extensive and call for a renewed commitment to better understand the correlates of invasion success. 2. Here, we explored several putative drivers of species invasion among woody non-native trees and shrubs in southern Africa, a region of high floristic diversity. We tested for differences in functional traits between plant categories using a combination of phylogenetic independent contrasts and a simulation-based phylogenetic...

Data from: Thixotropy and rheopexy of muscle fibers probed using sinusoidal oscillations

David Altman, Fabio C. Minozzo & Dilson E. Rassier
Length changes of muscle fibers have previously been shown to result in a temporary reduction in fiber stiffness that is referred to as thixotropy. Understanding the mechanism of this thixotropy is important to our understanding of muscle function since there are many instances in which muscle is subjected to repeated patterns of lengthening and shortening. By applying sinusoidal length changes to one end of single permeabilized muscle fibers and measuring the force response at the...

Data from: \"Identification of SNP markers for the endangered Ugandan red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) using RAD sequencing\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 December 2014 to 31 January 2015

Maria Jose Ruiz Lopez, Tony L. Goldberg, Colin A. Chapman, Patrick A. Omeja, James H. Jones, William M. Switzer, Paul D. Etter, Eric A. Johnson & Nelson Ting
Despite dramatic growth in the field of primate genomics over the past decade, studies of primate population and conservation genomics in the wild have been hampered due to the difficulties inherent in studying non-model organisms and endangered species, such as lack of a reference genome and current challenges in de novo primate genome assembly. Here, we used Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to develop a population-based SNP panel for the Ugandan red colobus (P. rufomitratus...

Data from: Monoallelic chromatin conformation flanking long-range silenced domains in cancer-derived and normal cells

Domenic Di Paola, John Raelson, Emmanouil Rampakakis, Mark Basik, Maria Zannis-Hadjopoulos & W. Edward C. Bradley
Epigenetic inactivation of chromatin plays an important role in determining cell phenotype in both normal and cancer cells, but our knowledge is still incomplete with respect to any potential monoallelic nature of the phenomenon. We have genotyped DNA isolated from chromatin of two colorectal cancer-derived lines and a culture of normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC), which was immunoprecipitated with antibodies to acetylated vs. methylated histone H3K9, and presented the data as B allele frequency...

Data from: Recent selection for self-compatibility in a population of Leavenworthia alabamica

Adam C. Herman & Daniel J. Schoen
The evolution of self-compatibility (SC) is the first step in the evolutionary transition in plants from outcrossing enforced by self-incompatibility (SI) to self-fertilization. In the Brassicaceae, SI is controlled by alleles of two tightly linked genes at the S-locus. Despite permitting inbreeding, mutations at the S-locus leading to SC may be selected if they provide reproductive assurance and/or gain a transmission advantage in a population when SC plants self- and outcross. Positive selection can leave...

Data from: The wings before the bird: an evaluation of flapping-based locomotory hypotheses in bird antecedents

T. Alexander Dececchi, Hans C.E. Larsson & Michael B. Habib
Background. Powered flight is implicated as a major driver for the success of birds. Here we examine the effectiveness of three hypothesized pathways for the evolution of the flight stroke, the forelimb motion that powers aerial locomotion, in a terrestrial setting across a range of stem and basal avians: flap running, Wing Assisted Incline Running (WAIR), and wing-assisted leaping. Methods. Using biomechanical mathematical models based on known aerodynamic principals and in vivo experiments and ground...

Data from: Predicting the outcome of competition when fitness inequality is variable

Michael T. Pedruski, Gregor F. Fussmann & Andrew Gonzalez
Traditional niche theory predicts that when species compete for one limiting resource in simple ecological settings the more fit competitor should exclude the less fit competitor. Since the advent of neutral theory ecologists have increasingly become interested both in how the magnitude of fitness inequality between competitors and stochasticity may affect this prediction. We used numerical simulations to investigate the outcome of two-species resource competition along gradients of fitness inequality (inequality in R*) and initial...

Data from: Scoring tools for the analysis of infant respiratory inductive plethysmography signals

Carlos Alejandro Robles-Rubio, Gianluca Bertolizio, Karen A. Brown & Robert E. Kearney
Infants recovering from anesthesia are at risk of life threatening Postoperative Apnea (POA). POA events are rare, and so the study of POA requires the analysis of long cardiorespiratory records. Manual scoring is the preferred method of analysis for these data, but it is limited by low intra- and inter-scorer repeatability. Furthermore, recommended scoring rules do not provide a comprehensive description of the respiratory patterns. This work describes a set of manual scoring tools that...

Data from: Multi-contrast submillimetric 3-Tesla hippocampal subfield segmentation protocol and dataset

Jessie Kulaga-Yoskovitz, Boris C. Bernhardt, Seok-Jun Hong, Tommaso Mansi, Kevin E. Liang, Andre J. W. Van Der Kouwe, Jonathan Smallwood, Andrea Bernasconi & Neda Bernasconi
The hippocampus is composed of distinct anatomical subregions that participate in multiple cognitive processes and are differentially affected in prevalent neurological and psychiatric conditions. Advances in high-field MRI allow for the non-invasive identification of hippocampal substructure. These approaches, however, demand time-consuming manual segmentation that relies heavily on anatomical expertise. Here, we share manual labels and associated high-resolution MRI data (MNI-HISUB25; submillimetric T1- and T2-weighted images, detailed sequence information, and stereotaxic probabilistic anatomical maps) based on...

Data from: Assessing reproductive isolation using a contact zone between parapatric lake-stream stickleback ecotypes

Dieta Hanson, Jean-Sébastien Moore, Eric B. Taylor, Rowan D.H. Barrett, Andrew P. Hendry, J.-S. Moore & R. D. H. Barrett
Ecological speciation occurs when populations evolve reproductive isolation as a result of divergent natural selection. This isolation can be influenced by many potential reproductive barriers, including selection against hybrids, selection against migrants, and assortative mating. How and when these barriers act and interact in nature is understood for relatively few empirical systems. We used a mark-recapture experiment in a contact zone between lake and stream three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus, Linnaeus) to evaluate the occurrence of...

Data from: Multiple pairwise analysis of non-homologous centromere coupling reveals preferential chromosome size-dependent interactions and a role for bouquet formation in establishing the interaction pattern

Philippe Lefrançois, Beth Rockmill, Pingxing Xie, G. Shirleen Roeder & Michael Snyder
During meiosis, chromosomes undergo a homology search in order to locate their homolog to form stable pairs and exchange genetic material. Early in prophase, chromosomes associate in mostly non-homologous pairs, tethered only at their centromeres. This phenomenon, conserved through higher eukaryotes, is termed centromere coupling in budding yeast. Both initiation of recombination and the presence of homologs are dispensable for centromere coupling (occurring in spo11 mutants and haploids induced to undergo meiosis) but the presence...

Data from: Relationship between the sequencing and timing of vocal motor elements in birdsong

Andrew M. M. Matheson & Jon T. Sakata
Accurate coordination of the sequencing and timing of motor gestures is important for the performance of complex and evolutionarily relevant behaviors. However, the degree to which motor sequencing and timing are related remains largely unknown. Birdsong is a communicative behavior that consists of discrete vocal motor elements (‘syllables’) that are sequenced and timed in a precise manner. To reveal the relationship between syllable sequencing and timing, we analyzed how variation in the probability of syllable...

Data from: Experimental evidence for within- and cross-seasonal effects of fear on survival and reproduction

Kyle H. Elliott, Gustavo S. Betini, Ian Dworkin & D. Ryan Norris
Fear of predation can have non-lethal effects on individuals within a season but whether, and to what extent, these effects carry over into subsequent seasons is not known. Using a replicated seasonal population of the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we examined both within- and cross-seasonal effects of fear on survival and reproductive output. Compared to controls, flies exposed to the scent of mantid (Tenodera sinensis) predators in the non-breeding season had 64% higher mortality,...

Data from: Predators inhibit brain cell proliferation in natural populations of electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentals

Kent D. Dunlap, Alex Tran, Michael Ragazzi, Rudiger Krahe, Vielka Salazar, Michael A. Ragazzi & Vielka L. Salazar
Compared to laboratory environments, complex natural environments promote brain cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Predators are one important feature of many natural environments, and, in the laboratory, predatory stimuli tend to inhibit brain cell proliferation. Often, laboratory predator stimuli also elevate plasma glucocorticoids, which can then reduce brain cell proliferation. However, it is unknown how natural predators affect cell proliferation or whether glucocorticoids mediate the neurogenic response to natural predators. We examined brain cell proliferation in...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    89
  • 2021
    33
  • 2020
    49
  • 2019
    26
  • 2018
    47
  • 2017
    28
  • 2016
    29
  • 2015
    40
  • 2014
    22
  • 2013
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    399

Affiliations

  • McGill University
    399
  • University of Montreal
    46
  • First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University
    46
  • Soochow University
    46
  • Wuhan University
    40
  • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College
    38
  • Zhejiang University
    36
  • Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University
    34
  • Shanghai Jiao Tong University
    34
  • Institute of Hydrobiology
    32