39 Works

Plasticity in floral longevity and sex-phase duration of Lobelia siphilitica in response to simulated pollinator declines

Christina Caruso & Kiana Lee
Premise: Pollinator declines can reduce the quantity and quality of pollination services, resulting in less pollen deposited on flowers and lower seed production by plants. In response to these reductions, plants can increase the opportunity for pollination by plastically adjusting their floral traits, including floral longevity and sex-phase duration. However, studies of plant responses to pollinator declines have primarily focused on floral evolution across generations rather than plasticity in floral traits within a generation. Methods:...

Additional file 1 of Correlation scan: identifying genomic regions that affect genetic correlations applied to fertility traits

Babatunde S. Olasege, Laercio R. Porto-Neto, Muhammad S. Tahir, Gabriela C. Gouveia, Angela Cánovas, Ben J. Hayes & Marina R. S. Fortes
Additional file 1. The number of windows, chromosome number, chromosome coordinates, and correlation estimates of each window for the two trait pairs in Brahman and Tropical Composite population (Table S1-S2).

Cumulative cultural evolution and mechanisms for cultural selection in wild bird songs

Heather Williams, Andrew Scharf, Anna R. Ryba, D. Ryan Norris, Daniel J. Mennill, Amy E. M. Newman, Stéphanie M. Doucet & Julie C. Blackwood
Cumulative cultural evolution, the accumulation of sequential changes within a single socially learned behaviour that results in improved function, is prominent in humans and has been documented in experimental studies of captive animals and managed wild populations. Here, we provide evidence that cumulative cultural evolution has occurred in the learned songs of Savannah sparrows. In a first step, “click trains” replaced “high note clusters” over a period of three decades. We use mathematical modeling to...

Data from: Limited evidence of a genetic basis for sex determination in the common creek chub, Semotilus atromaculatus

Amanda V. Meuser, Cassandre B. Pyne & Elizabeth G. Mandeville
Sexual reproduction is almost universal in vertebrates of the animal kingdom; therefore, each species which use it must have a mechanism for designating sex as male or female. Fish especially have a wide range of sex determining systems. In the present study, we aimed to identify a genetic basis for sex determination in the common creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) using genotyping-by-sequencing data. No sex-associated markers were found by RADSex or a GWAS using GEMMA, however,...

Evaluating the use of hair as a non-invasive indicator of trace mineral status in woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou)

Naima Jutha, Claire Jardine, Helen Schwantje, Jesper Mosbacher, David Kinniburgh & Susan Kutz
Trace mineral imbalances can have significant effects on animal health, reproductive success, and survival. Monitoring their status in wildlife populations is, therefore, important for management and conservation. Typically, livers and kidneys are sampled to measure mineral status, but biopsies and lethal-sampling are not always possible, particularly for Species at Risk. We aimed to: 1) determine baseline mineral levels in Northern Mountain caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou; Gmelin, 1788) in northwestern British Columbia, Canada, and 2) determine...

The genomic consistency of the loss of anadromy in an Arctic fish (Salvelinus alpinus)

Sarah Salisbury, Gregory McCracken, Robert Perry, Donald Keefe, Kara Layton, Tony Kess, Cameron Nugent, Jong Leong, Ian Bradbury, Ben Koop, Moira Ferguson & Daniel Ruzzante
The potentially significant genetic consequences associated with the loss of migratory capacity of diadromous fishes which have become landlocked in freshwater are poorly understood. Consistent selective pressures associated with freshwater residency may drive repeated differentiation both between allopatric landlocked and anadromous populations and within landlocked populations (resulting in sympatric morphs). Alternatively, the strong genetic drift anticipated in isolated landlocked populations could hinder consistent adaptation, limiting genetic parallelism. Understanding the degree of genetic parallelism underlying differentiation...

Ecological outcomes of hybridization vary extensively in Catostomus fishes

Elizabeth Mandeville, Elizabeth Mandeville, Robert Ogden Hall & Alex Buerkle
Hybridization outcomes vary geographically and can depend on the environment. Hybridization can also reshape biotic interactions, leading to ecological shifts. If hybrids function differently ecologically in ways that enhance or reduce fitness, and those ecological roles vary geographically, ecological factors might explain variation in hybridization outcomes. However, relatively few studies have focused on ecological traits of hybrids. We compared the feeding ecology of Catostomus fish species and hybrids by using stable isotopes δ13C and δ15N...

Additional file 8 of Correlation scan: identifying genomic regions that affect genetic correlations applied to fertility traits

Babatunde S. Olasege, Laercio R. Porto-Neto, Muhammad S. Tahir, Gabriela C. Gouveia, Angela Cánovas, Ben J. Hayes & Marina R. S. Fortes
Additional file 8. The enriched QTLs of the driver and antagonizing regions for all trait pairs in Brahman and Tropical Composite cattle. The enriched QTLs are rank based on the adj.pval (Table S21-28).

Additional file 1 of Comparative transcriptomics analysis pipeline for the meta-analysis of phylogenetically divergent datasets (CoRMAP)

Yiru Sheng, R. Ayesha Ali & Andreas Heyland
Additional file 1. Supplementary Table 1. A configuration table listing key parameters used in CoRMAP.

Additional file 5 of Correlation scan: identifying genomic regions that affect genetic correlations applied to fertility traits

Babatunde S. Olasege, Laercio R. Porto-Neto, Muhammad S. Tahir, Gabriela C. Gouveia, Angela Cánovas, Ben J. Hayes & Marina R. S. Fortes
Additional file 5. The number of windows, chromosome number, chromosome coordinates, correlation estimates and rank value for the drivers and antagonizing regions (Bonferroni corrected p < 0.05) in Brahman (BB) and Tropical Composite population for the studied trait (Table S12-19).

Additional file 2 of Effect of up to 30-days of storage at different temperatures on detection of feline kidney injury molecule-1 in urine

Aleksandra Milaszewska, Alice Defarges, Michelle Oblak, Brigitte Brisson, Gabrielle Monteith & Dorothee Bienzle
Additional file 2.

Simulated pollinator decline has similar effects on seed production of female and hermaphrodite Lobelia siphilitica, but different effects on selection on floral traits

Gavin Hossack & Christina Caruso
PREMISE: Pollinator decline, by reducing seed production, is predicted to strengthen natural selection on floral traits. However, the effect of pollinator decline on gender dimorphic species (such as gynodioecious species, where plants produce female or hermaphrodite flowers) may differ between the sex morphs: if pollinator decline reduces the seed production of females more than hermaphrodites, then it should also have a larger effect on selection on floral traits in females than in hermaphrodites. RESULTS: Experimentally...

Long-term resilience of primary sex ratios in a species with temperature dependent sex determination after decades of climate warming

Jessica A. Leivesley, E. Graham Nancekivell, Ronald J. Brooks, Jacqueline Litzgus & Njal Rollinson
Species with environmental sex determination (ESD) have persisted through deep time, despite massive environmental perturbation in the geological record. Understanding how species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), a type of ESD, persist through climate change is particularly timely given the current climate crisis, as highly biased sex ratios and extinction are predicted. Since 1982, we have studied primary sex ratios of a reptile with TSD (Chelydra serpentina). Primary sex ratios remained unchanged over time, despite...

Do pseudogenes pose a problem for metabarcoding marine animal communities?

Jessica Schultz & Paul Hebert
Because DNA metabarcoding typically employs sequence diversity among mitochondrial amplicons to estimate species composition, nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (NUMTs) can inflate diversity. This study quantifies the incidence and attributes of NUMTs derived from the 658 bp barcode region of cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) in 156 marine animal genomes. NUMTs were examined to ascertain if they could be recognized by their possession of indels or stop codons. In total, 309 NUMTs  150 bp were detected,...

Data from: Environmental filtering of macroinvertebrate traits influences ecosystem functioning in a large river floodplain

Natalie K. Rideout, Zacchaeus G. Compson, Wendy A. Monk, Meghann R. Bruce, Mehrdad Hajibabaei, Teresita M. Porter, Michael T.G. Wright & Donald J. Baird
The Biodiversity-Ecosystem Function hypothesis postulates that higher biodiversity is correlated with faster ecosystem process rates and increased ecosystem stability in fluctuating environments. Exhibiting high spatio-temporal habitat diversity, floodplains are highly productive ecosystems, supporting communities that are naturally resilient and highly diverse. We examined linkages among floodplain wetland habitats, invertebrate communities and their associated traits, and ecosystem function across 60 sites within the floodplain wetlands of the lower Wolastoq | Saint John River, New Brunswick, using...

Additional file 10 of Correlation scan: identifying genomic regions that affect genetic correlations applied to fertility traits

Babatunde S. Olasege, Laercio R. Porto-Neto, Muhammad S. Tahir, Gabriela C. Gouveia, Angela Cánovas, Ben J. Hayes & Marina R. S. Fortes
Additional file 10. Canonical pathways significantly enriched (Benjamini-Hochberg P-values < 0.01) for all trait pairs in Brahman and Tropical Composite population (Fig. S5-S12).

Data from: A first draft of the core fungal microbiome of Schedonorus arundinaceus with and without its fungal mutualist Epichloë coenophiala

Jenna Dale & Jonathan Newman
Tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus) is a cool-season grass that is commonly infected with the fungal endophyte Epichloë coenophiala. Although the relationship between tall fescue and E. coenophiala is well-studied, less is known about its broader fungal communities. We used next-generation sequencing of the ITS2 region to describe the complete foliar fungal microbiomes in a set of field-grown tall fescue plants over two years, and whether these fungal communities were affected by the presence of Epichloë....

Additional file 4 of Comparative transcriptomics analysis pipeline for the meta-analysis of phylogenetically divergent datasets (CoRMAP)

Yiru Sheng, R. Ayesha Ali & Andreas Heyland
Additional file 4. Mapping approach, 179 common DEGs were found in MT and MC when data were normalized by TMM and filtered by no-adjusted p-value < 0.05 cut-off.

Additional file 4 of Comparative transcriptomics analysis pipeline for the meta-analysis of phylogenetically divergent datasets (CoRMAP)

Yiru Sheng, R. Ayesha Ali & Andreas Heyland
Additional file 4. Mapping approach, 179 common DEGs were found in MT and MC when data were normalized by TMM and filtered by no-adjusted p-value < 0.05 cut-off.

Genomic basis of deep‐water adaptation in Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus) morphs

Tony Kess, J. Brian Dempson, Sarah J. Lehnert, Kara Layton, Anthony Einfeldt, Paul Bentzen, Sarah Salisbury, Amber Messmer, Steven Duffy, Daniel Ruzzante, Cameron Nugent, Moira Ferguson, Jong Leong, Ben Koop, Michael O'Connell, Ian Bradbury, Kara K. S. Layton, Sarah J. Salisbury, Amber M. Messmer, Daniel E. Ruzzante, Cameron M. Nugent, Moira M. Ferguson, Jong S. Leong, Ben F. Koop, Michael F. O’Connell … & Ian R. Bradbury
Colonization of extreme habitats requires extensive adaptation to novel environmental challenges. Deep-water environments (>50 m) have high hydrostatic pressure, low temperature, and low light, requiring physiological and visual system adaptation, but genomic mechanisms underlying evolution in these environments are rarely known. Post-glacial colonization of Gander Lake in Newfoundland, Canada, by Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus) provides the opportunity to study the genomic basis of adaptation to extreme deep-water environments. Here, we compare genomic and morphometric divergence...

Body size and digestive system shape resource selection by ungulates: a cross-taxa test of the Forage Maturation Hypothesis

Saeideh Esmaeili, Brett Jesmer, Shannon Albeke, Ellen Aikens, Kathryn Schoenecker, Sarah King, Briana Abrahms, Bayarbaatar Buuveibaatar, Jeffrey Beck, Randall Boone, Francesca Cagnacci, Simon Chamaillé-Jammes, Buyanaa Chimeddorj, Paul Cross, Nandintsetseg Dejid, Jagdag Enkhbayar, Ilya Fischhoff, Adam Ford, Kate Jenks, Mahmoud-Reza Hemami, Jacob Hennig, Takehiko Ito, Petra Kaczensky, Matthew Kauffman, John Linnell … & Jacob Goheen
The Forage Maturation Hypothesis (FMH) states that energy intake for ungulates is maximized when forage biomass is at intermediate levels. Nevertheless, metabolic allometry and different digestive systems suggest that resource selection should vary across ungulate species. By combining GPS relocations with remotely-sensed data on forage characteristics and surface water, we quantified the effect of body size and digestive system in determining movements of 30 populations of hindgut fermenters (equids) and ruminants across biomes. Selection for...

Additional file 1 of Comparative transcriptomics analysis pipeline for the meta-analysis of phylogenetically divergent datasets (CoRMAP)

Yiru Sheng, R. Ayesha Ali & Andreas Heyland
Additional file 1. Supplementary Table 1. A configuration table listing key parameters used in CoRMAP.

Additional file 3 of Comparative transcriptomics analysis pipeline for the meta-analysis of phylogenetically divergent datasets (CoRMAP)

Yiru Sheng, R. Ayesha Ali & Andreas Heyland
Additional file 3. Trimmed Mean of M-values.

Helminth-associated changes in host immune phenotype connect top-down and bottom-up interactions during co-infection

Vanessa Ezenwa, Mauricio Seguel, Sarah Budischak & Anna Jolles
Within-host parasite interactions can be mediated by the host and changes in host phenotypes often serve as indicators of the presence or intensity of parasite interactions. Parasites like helminths induce a range of physiological, morphological, and immunological changes in hosts that can drive bottom-up (resource-mediated) or top-down (immune-mediated) interactions with co-infecting parasites. Although top-down and bottom-up interactions are typically studied in isolation, the diverse phenotypic changes induced by parasite infection may serve as a useful...

Additional file 2 of Effect of up to 30-days of storage at different temperatures on detection of feline kidney injury molecule-1 in urine

Aleksandra Milaszewska, Alice Defarges, Michelle Oblak, Brigitte Brisson, Gabrielle Monteith & Dorothee Bienzle
Additional file 2.

Registration Year

  • 2022
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    39

Affiliations

  • University of Guelph
    39
  • University of Queensland
    10
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    10
  • Agriculture and Food
    10
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    10
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • University of Windsor
    2