8 Works

Human impact, climate and dispersal strategies determine plant invasion on islands

Severin D. H. Irl, Andreas H. Schweiger, Manuel J. Steinbauer, Claudine Ah-Peng, José R. Arévalo, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Alessandro Chiarucci, Curtis C. Daehler, José M. Fernández-Palacios, Olivier Flores, Christoph Kueffer, Petr Madera, Rüdiger Otto, Julienne M. I. Schweiger, Dominique Strasberg & Anke Jentsch
Aim: Biological invasions are likely determined by species dispersal strategies as well as environmental characteristics of a recipient region, especially climate and human impact. However, the contribution of climatic factors, human impact and dispersal strategies in driving invasion processes is still controversial and not well embedded in the existing theoretical considerations. Here, we study how climate, species dispersal strategies and human impact determine plant invasion processes on islands distributed in all major oceans in the...

Evolutionary winners are ecological losers among oceanic island plants

José María Fernández-Palacios, Rüdiger Otto, Michael K. Borregaard, Holger Kreft, Jonathan P. Price, Manuel J. Steinbauer, Patrick Weigelt & Robert J. Whittaker
Aim: Adaptive radiation, in which successful lineages proliferate by exploiting untapped niche space, provides a popular but potentially misleading characterization of evolution on oceanic islands. Here we analyse the respective roles of members of in situ diversified vs. non-diversified lineages in shaping the main ecosystems of an archipelago to explore the relationship between evolutionary and ecological ‘success’. Location: Canary Islands. Taxon: Vascular plants. Methods: We quantified the abundance/rarity of the native flora according to the...

Data from: Overall dynamic body acceleration measures activity differently on large vs small aquatic animals

Lucía Martina Martín López, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Peter Teglberg Madsen & Mark Johnson
Acceleration-based proxies for activity and energy expenditure are widely used in bio-logging studies of animal movement and locomotion to explore biomechanical strategies, energetic costs of behaviour, habitat use and the impact of anthropogenic disturbance. The foremost such proxy is Overall Dynamic Body Acceleration (ODBA) along with variants VeDBA and PDBA. This technique, which involves summing the magnitude of high-pass-filtered acceleration signals (the so-called dynamic acceleration) over a reference interval, has been applied to animals as...

Speciation in the abyss - genomics and morphology reveal a new species of beaked whale

Emma L. Carroll, Michael R. McGowen, Morgan L. McCarthy, Felix G. Marx, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Merel L. Dalebout, Sascha Dreyer, Oscar E. Gaggiotti, Sabine S. Hansen, Anton Van Helden, Aubrie B. Onoufriou, Robin W. Baird, C. Scott Baker, Simon Berrow, Danielle Cholewiak, Diane Claridge, Rochelle Constantine, Nicholas J. Davison, Catarina Eira, R. Ewan Fordyce, John Gatesy, G. J. Greg Hofmeyr, Vidal Martin, James G. Mead, Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni … & Morten T. Olsen
Earth’s deep oceans remains less well understood than the surface of Mars. Beaked whales (ziphiids) are among the most visible inhabitants of the abyss, due to their large size and worldwide distribution, yet their diversity and ecology remain obscure. We combine genomic and morphometric analyses to reveal a new Southern Hemisphere ziphiid species, Ramari’s beaked whale, Mesoplodon eueu, whose name is linked to the Indigenous people of the lands from which the species holotype and...

Changes in community-weighted trait mean, functional diversity, soil chemical properties and temperature along an elevational gradient in Tenerife, Canary Islands

Amanda Ratier Backes, Larissa Frey, José Ramón Arévalo & Sylvia Haider
This dataset comprises community-weighted trait means and functional diversity of leaf traits, chemical soil properties and temperature recorded in roadside (disturbed) and interior (less disturbed) plots, along an elevational gradient of 2,300 m in Tenerife, Canary Islands. The leaf traits measured were specific leaf area (SLA), nitrogen, nitrogen to phosphorus ratio, leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon to phosphorus ratio. The soil chemical properties measured were pH, nitrogen, nitrogen to phosphorus ratio, carbon to...

Data on infection experiments of cane toads

Martin Mayer, Lia Schlippe Justicia, Richard Shine & Gregory Brown
This dataset contains data from an infection experiment described in the paper: “Mayer, M., Schlippe Justicia, L, Shine, R., & Brown, G. P. (2021). Host defense or parasite cue: Skin secretions mediate interactions between amphibians and their parasites. Ecology Letters, in revision”. Amphibian skin secretions (substances produced by the amphibian plus microbiota) plausibly act as a first line of defense against parasite/pathogen attack, but may also provide chemical cues for pathogens. To clarify the role...

Controls of chlorophyll fluorescence spectra vary among leaves in a boreal forest and over a spring recovery of photosynthesis

Paulina Rajewicz, Chao Zhang, Jon Atherton, Shari Van Wittenberghe, Anu Riikonen, Troy Magney, Beatriz Fernandez-Marin, Jose Ignacio Garcia Plazaola & Albert Porcar-Castell
Chlorophyll fluorescence can be used to track to seasonal dynamics of photosynthesis in boreal forests. However, the relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis is affected by biochemical and morphological factors, which vary across time and space as a function of light environment, species, and environmental conditions. We investigated how various factors, and their spatio-temporal dynamics during spring recovery of photosynthesis in a boreal forest, affect spatio-temporal variation in chlorophyll fluorescence spectra. The factors under consideration...

Echolocating toothed whales use ultra-fast echo-kinetic responses to track evasive prey

Heather Vance, Peter Madsen, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Danuta Wisniewska, Michael Ladegaard, Sascha Hooker & Mark Johnson
Visual predators rely on fast-acting optokinetic responses to track and capture agile prey. Most toothed whales, however, rely on echolocation for hunting and have converged on biosonar clicking rates reaching 500/s during prey pu rsuits. If echoes are processed on a click by click basis, as assumed, neural responses 100x faster than those in vision are required to keep pace with this information flow. Using high resolution bio-logging of wild predator prey interactions we show...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    8

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • University of La Laguna
    8
  • Aarhus University
    3
  • University of Bayreuth
    2
  • University of St Andrews
    2
  • University of Copenhagen
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • University of La Réunion
    1
  • University of Hohenheim
    1
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine
    1
  • University of Aveiro
    1