99 Works

Data from: The influence of weather conditions during gestation on life histories in a wild Arctic ungulate

Mathieu Douhard, Leif Egil Loe, Audun Stien, Christophe Bonenfant, R. Justin Irvine, Vebjørn Veiberg, Erik Ropstad & Steve Albon
The internal predictive adaptive response (internal PAR) hypothesis predicts that individuals born in poor conditions should start to reproduce earlier if they are likely to have reduced performance in later life. However, whether this is the case remains unexplored in wild populations. Here, we use longitudinal data from a long-term study of Svalbard reindeer to examine age-related changes in adult female life-history responses to environmental conditions experienced in utero as indexed by rain-on-snow (ROSutero). We...

Data from: Quantifying individual heterogeneity and its influence on life-history trajectories: different methods for different questions and contexts

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Mathieu Douhard, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Fanie Pelletier & Nigel G. Yoccoz
Heterogeneity among individuals influences the life-history trajectories we observe at the population level because viability selection, selective immigration and emigration processes, and ontogeny change the proportion of individuals with specific trait values with increasing age. Here, we review the two main approaches that have been proposed to account for these processes in life-history trajectories, contrasting how they quantify ontogeny and selection, and proposing ways to overcome some of their limitations. Nearly all existing approaches to...

Data from: A single multiplex of twelve microsatellite markers for the simultaneous study of the brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and the mountain hare (Lepus timidus)

Marie-Pauline Beugin, Jérôme Letty, Cécile Kaerle, Jean-Sébastien Guitton, Lina Muselet, Guillaume Queney & Dominique Pontier
The management of hunted species is challenging, as it must conciliate the conservation of species and their sustainable exploitation. Non-genetic tools are widely used in this context but they may present limitations notably when species can hybridize or when large-scale spatial monitoring is required to establish optimal management actions. This is why genetic tools have been more and more integrated in wildlife management practices. However, the markers proposed are often amplified in small multiplexes when...

Data from: Bayesian phylogeographic inferences reveal contrasting colonization dynamics among European groundwater isopods

David Eme, Florian Malard, Lara Konecny-Dupré, Tristan Lefébure & Christophe J. Douady
The potentially important role of northern microrefugia during postglacial dispersal is challenging the view of southern Europe as a refuge and source area of European biota. In groundwaters, large geographic ranges of presumably good dispersers are increasingly suspected to consist of assemblages of cryptic species with narrow ranges. Moreover, a large species range, even when confirmed by molecular evidence, tells us little about the spatiotemporal dynamics of dispersal. Here, we used phylogenetic inferences, species delineation...

Data from: Exploring and visualising spaces of tree reconciliations

Katharina T. Huber, Vincent Moulton, Marie-France Sagot & Blerina Sinaimeri
Tree reconciliation is the mathematical tool that is used to investigate the coevolution of organisms, such as hosts and parasites. A common approach to tree reconciliation involves specifying a model that assigns costs to certain events, such as cospeciation, and then tries to find a mapping between two specified phylogenetic trees which minimises the total cost of the implied events. For such models, it has been shown that there may be a huge number of...

Data from: Metabarcoding for the parallel identification of several hundred predators and their preys: application to bat species diet analysis

Maxime Galan, Jean-Baptiste Pons, Orianne Tournayre, Eric Pierre, Maxime Leuchtmann, Dominique Pontier & Nathalie Charbonnel
Assessing diet variability is of main importance to better understand the biology of bats and design conservation strategies. Although the advent of metabarcoding has facilitated such analyses, this approach does not come without challenges. Biases may occur throughout the whole experiment, from fieldwork to biostatistics, resulting in the detection of false negatives, false positives or low taxonomic resolution. We detail a rigorous metabarcoding approach based on a short COI minibarcode and two-step PCR protocol enabling...

Data from: Non-traditional isotope perspectives in vertebrate palaeobiology

Jeremy E. Martin, Theo Tacail & Vincent Balter
The recent development of multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) notably in the disciplines of earth sciences, now allows the precise measurement of isotope ratios, even at low concentration. Non-traditional isotope systems, such as alkaline earth (Ca, Mg) and transition (Cu, Fe, Zn) metals are now being measured in a variety of biological tissues, including bone and teeth. Although our understanding of the environmental and biological mechanisms behind the fractionation of such elements is...

Data from: Testing determinants of the annual individual fitness: an overall mean mixture model for de-lifing data

Pierre Dupont, Dominique Allainé, Aurélie Cohas & Roger Pradel
1. The de-lifing method (Coulson et al. 2006), though very promising for studying ecological and evolutionary changes, has been scarcely used to identify factors influential on fitness. 2. Through simulations representative of a variety of iteroparous species, we establish that a two-component normal mixture usually provides a much better representation of de-lifing data than the single normal distribution assumed in classical linear models. 3. To test determinants of the annual individual fitness, we propose the...

Data from: Evaluating the accuracy of biodiversity changes through geological times: from simulation to solution

Corentin Gibert & Gilles Escarguel
Estimating biodiversity and its variations through geologic time is a notoriously difficult task, due to several taphonomic and methodological effects that make the reconstructed signal potentially distinct from the unknown, original one. Through a simulation approach, we examine the effect of a major, surprisingly still understudied, source of potential disturbance: the effect of time discretization through biochronological construction, which generates spurious coexistences of taxa within discrete time intervals (i.e., biozones), and thus potentially makes continuous-...

Data from: On the evolutionary consequences of increasing litter size with multiple paternity in wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa)

Thibault Gayet, Sebastien Devillard, Marlène Gamelon, Serge Brandt, Ludovic Say & Eric Baubet
Understanding how some species may be able to evolve quickly enough to deal with anthropogenic pressure is of prime interest in evolutionary biology, conservation and management. Wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) populations keep growing all over Europe despite increasing hunting pressure. In wild boar populations subject to male-selective harvesting, the initially described polygynous mating system may switch to a promiscuous/polyandrous one. Such a change in the mating system, where potentially more males sire a litter...

Drivers of amphibian population dynamics and asynchrony at local and regional scales

Hugo Cayuela, Richard A. Griffiths, Nurul Zakaria, Jan W. Arntzen, Pauline Priol, Jean-Paul Léna, Aurélien Besnard & Pierre Joly
Identifying the drivers of population fluctuations in spatially distinct populations remains a significant challenge for ecologists. Whereas regional climatic factors may generate population synchrony (i.e., the Moran effect), local factors including the level of density-dependence may reduce the level of synchrony. Although divergences in the scaling of population synchrony and spatial environmental variation have been observed, the regulatory factors that underlie such mismatches are poorly understood. Few previous studies have investigated how density-dependent processes and...

Data from: Immunogenetic heterogeneity in a widespread ungulate: the European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus)

Erwan Quéméré, Maxime Galan, Jean-François Cosson, François Klein, Stéphane Aulagnier, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Joël Merlet, A. J. Mark Hewison & Nathalie Charbonnel
Understanding how immune genetic variation is shaped by selective and neutral processes in wild populations is of prime importance in both evolutionary biology and epidemiology. The European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) has considerably expanded its distribution range these last decades, notably by colonizing agricultural landscapes. This range shift is likely to have led to bottlenecks and increased roe deer exposure to a new range of pathogens that until recently predominantly infected humans and domestic fauna....

Data from: Ultrasonic cavitation induces necrosis and impairs growth in three-dimensional models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Einas Abou Ali, Benoit Bordacaha, Jean-Louis Mestas, Frederic Batteux, Cyril Lafon, Marine Camus & Frederic Prat
Introduction: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a rapidly increasing cause of mortality whose dismal prognosis is mainly due to overwhelming chemoresistance. New therapeutic approaches include physical agents such as ultrasonic cavitation, but clinical applications require further insights in the mechanisms of cytotoxicity. Three dimensional in vitro culture models such as spheroids exploit realistic spatial, biochemical and cellular heterogeneity that may bridge some of the experimental gap between conventional in vitro and in vivo experiments. Purpose:...

Direct observation of hyperpolarization breaking through the spin diffusion barrier

Quentin Stern, Samuel F. Cousin, Frederic Mentink-Vigier, Arthur C. Pinon, Stuart J. Elliott, Olivier Cala & Sami Jannin
Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used tool for overcoming the low intrinsic sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Its practical applicability is typically bounded, however, by the so-called ‘spin diffusion barrier’, which relates to the poor efficiency of polarization transfer from highly polarized nuclei close to paramagnetic centers to bulk nuclei. A quantitative assessment of this barrier has been hindered so far by the lack of general methods for studying nuclear-polarization...

Enforced monoandry and female investment into reproduction

Gabriele Sorci, Loïc Lesobre, Pauline Vuarin, Gwènaëlle Levêque, Michel Saint Jalme & Frédéric Lacroix
While uncovering the costs and benefits of polyandry has attracted considerable attention, assessing the net effect of sexual selection on population fitness requires the experimental manipulation of female mating over generations, which is usually only achievable in laboratory populations of arthropods. However, knowing if sexual selection improves or impairs the expression of life history traits is key for the management of captive populations of endangered species, which are mostly long-lived birds and mammals. It might...

Muscle systems and motility of early animals highlighted by cnidarians from the basal Cambrian

Xing Wang, Jean Vannier, Xiaoguang Yang, Lucas Leclère, Qiang Ou, Xikun Song, Tsuyoshi Komiya & Jian Han
Although fossil evidence suggests that various animal groups were able to move actively through their environment in the early stages of their evolution, virtually no direct information is available on the nature of their muscle systems. The origin of jellyfish swimming, for example, is of great interest to biologists. Exceptionally preserved muscles are described here in benthic peridermal olivooid medusozoans from the basal Cambrian of China (Kuanchuanpu Formation, ca. 535 Ma) that have direct equivalent...

In silico and empirical evaluation of twelve metabarcoding primer sets for insectivorous diet analyses

Orianne Tournayre, Ondine Filippi-Codaccioni, Marine Trillat, Sylvain Piry, Dominique Pontier, Nathalie Charbonnel, Maxime Galan & Maxime Leuchtmann
During the most recent decade, environmental DNA metabarcoding approaches have been both developed and improved to minimize the biological and technical biases in these protocols. However, challenges remain, notably those relating to primer design. In the current study, we comprehensively assessed the performance of ten COI and two 16S primer pairs for eDNA metabarcoding, including novel and previously published primers. We used a combined approach of in silico, in vivo-mock community (33 arthropod taxa from...

Data from: Land cover, individual’s age and spatial sorting shape landscape resistance in the invasive frog Xenopus laevis

Giovanni Vimercati, Natasha Kruger & Jean Secondi
1. The description of functional connectivity is based on the quantification of landscape resistance, which represents species-specific movement costs across landscape features. Connectivity models use these costs to identify movement corridors at both individual and population levels and provide management recommendations for populations of conservation interest. Typically, resistance costs assigned to specific land cover types are assumed to be valid for all individuals of the population. Little attention has been paid to intraspecific variation in...

Datafiles and code for Covas et al: The oxidative cost of helping and its minimisation in a cooperative breeder

Rita Covas, Sophie Lardy, Liliana Silva, Benjamin Rey, André Ferreira, Franck Theron, Arnaud Tognetti, Bruno Faivre & Claire Doutrelant
Cooperative actions are beneficial to the group, but presumably costly to the individual co-operators. In cooperatively breeding species, helping to raise young is thought to involve important energetic costs, which could lead to elevated exposure to reactive oxygen species, resulting in oxidative stress. However, identifying such costs can be difficult if individuals adjust their investment in helping in relation to environmental conditions or their own physiological condition. Experimental approaches are therefore required to quantify the...

Data from: High-throughput sequencing of transposable element insertions suggests adaptive evolution of the invasive Asian Tiger Mosquito towards temperate environments

Clément Goubert, Hélène Henri, Guillaume Minard, Claire Valiente Moro, Patrick Mavingui, Cristina Vieira & Matthieu Boulesteix
Invasive species represent unique opportunities to evaluate the role of local adaptation during colonization of new environments. Among these species, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a threatening vector of several human viral diseases, including dengue and chikungunya, and raises concerns about the Zika fever. Its broad presence in both temperate and tropical environments has been considered the reflection of great “ecological plasticity.” However, no study has been conducted to assess the role of...

Data from: Divergent in shape and convergent in function: adaptive evolution of the mandible in Sub-Antarctic mice

Sabrina Renaud, Ronan Ledevin, Benoît Pisanu, Jean-Louis Chapuis, Petra Quillfeldt & Emilie A. Hardouin
Convergent evolution in similar environments constitutes strong evidence of adaptive evolution. Transported with people around the world, house mice colonized even remote areas, such as Sub-Antarctic islands. There, they returned to a feral way of life, shifting towards a diet enriched in terrestrial macroinvertebrates. Here, we test the hypothesis that this triggered convergent evolution of the mandible, a morphological character involved in food consumption. Mandible shape from four Sub-Antarctic islands was compared to phylogeny, tracing...

Data from: Contemporary variations of immune responsiveness during range expansion of two invasive rodents in Senegal

Christophe Diagne, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Stéphane Cornet, Laëtitia Husse, Souleymane Doucouré, Ambroise Dalecky, Khalilou Bâ, Mamadou Kane, Youssoupha Niang, Mamoudou Diallo, Aliou Sow, Odile Fossati-Gaschignard, Sylvain Piry, Emmaneulle Artige, Mbacké Sembène, Carine Brouat, Nathalie Charbonnel & Emmanuelle Artige
Biological invasions provide unique opportunities for studying life history trait changes over contemporary time scales. As spatial spread may be related to changes in parasite communities, several hypotheses (such as the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) or EICA-refined hypotheses) suggest immune changes in invasive species along invasion gradients. Although native hosts may be subject to similar changes in parasite selection pressures, their immune responses have been rarely investigated in invasion contexts. In this study,...

Data from: Recovery of benthic marine communities from the end-Permian mass extinction at the low-latitudes of Eastern Panthalassa

Richard Hofmann, Michael Hautmann, Arnaud Brayard, Alexander Nützel, Kevin Bylund, James Jenks, Emmanuelle Vennin, Nicolas Olivier & Hugo Bucher
Based on the quantitative community analysis using species-level identifications, we track the restoration of benthic ecosystems after the end-Permian mass extinction throughout the Lower Triassic of the western USA. New data on the palaeoecology of the Thaynes Group and Sinbad Formation are provided, which fill a gap between the recently studied palaeoecology of the Griesbachian–Dienerian Dinwoody Formation and the Spathian Virgin Formation. In the Sinbad Formation and Thaynes Group, 17 species (12 genera) of bivalves,...

Data from: δ18O-derived incubation temperatures of oviraptorosaur eggs

Romain Amiot, Xu Wang, Shuo Wang, Christophe Lécuyer, Jean-Michel Mazin, Jinyou Mo, Jean-Pierre Flandrois, François Fourel, Xiaolin Wang, Xing Xu, Zhijun Zhang & Zhonghe Zhou
In order to determine the incubation temperature of eggs laid by non-avian dinosaurs, we analysed the oxygen isotope compositions of both eggshell carbonate (δ18Oc) and embryo bone phosphate (δ18Op) from seven oviraptorosaur eggs with preserved in ovo embryo bones. These eggs come from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Jiangxi Province, China. Oviraptorosaur theropods were selected because of their known brooding behaviour as evidenced by preserved adult specimens fossilized in brooding posture on their clutch....

Data from: Transient growth-enhancing effects of elevated maternal thyroid hormones at no apparent oxidative cost during early postnatal period

Bin-Yan Hsu, Blandine Doligez, Lars Gustafsson & Suvi Ruuskanen
Maternal thyroid hormones (THs) have been proven crucial for embryonic development in humans, but their influence within the natural variation on wild animals remains unknown. So far the only two studies that experimentally investigated the potential fitness consequences of maternal THs in birds found inconsistent results. More studies are thus required to assess the general effects of maternal THs and their influences on more behavioral and physiological parameters. In this study, we experimentally elevated yolk...

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