99 Works

Data from: Back and forth Wolbachia transfers reveal efficient strains to control spotted wing drosophila populations

Julien Cattel, Katerina Nikolouli, Thibault Andrieux, Julien Martinez, Francis Jiggins, Sylvain Charlat, Fabrice Vavre, David Lejon, Patricia Gibert & Laurence Mouton
1.Since its recent invasion of the European and American continents, the spotted wing Drosophila Drosophila suzukii has become a burden of the fruit industry. Armed with a highly sclerotized ovipositor, females can lay eggs in a wider variety of ripening and healthy fruits than other Drosophila species. Economic losses due to Drosophila suzukii reach millions of dollars annually and methods to control natural populations in the field mainly rely on the use of chemical pesticides....

Data from: Introduction history overrides social factors in explaining genetic structure of females in Mediterranean mouflon

Elodie Portanier, Mathieu Garel, Sebastien Devillard, Pascal Marchand, Julie Andru, Daniel Maillard & Gilles Bourgoin
Fine-scale spatial genetic structure of populations results from social and spatial behaviors of individuals such as sex-biased dispersal and philopatry. However, the demographic history of a given population can override such socio-spatial factors in shaping genetic variability when bottlenecks or founder events occurred in the population. Here, we investigated whether socio-spatial organization determines the fine-scale genetic structure for both sexes in a Mediterranean mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon×Ovis sp.) population in southern France 60 years after...

Data from: Chikungunya virus impacts the diversity of symbiotic bacteria in mosquito vector

Karima Zouache, Rory J. Michelland, Anna-Bella Failloux, Genevieve L. Grundmann & Patrick Mavingui
Mosquitoes transmit numerous arboviruses including dengue and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). In recent years, mosquito species Aedes albopictus has expanded in the Indian Ocean region and was the principal vector of chikungunya outbreaks in La Reunion and neighbouring islands in 2005 and 2006. Vector-associated bacteria have recently been found to interact with transmitted pathogens. For instance, Wolbachia modulates the replication of viruses or parasites. However there has been no systematic evaluation of the diversity of the...

Data from: Membrane potential dynamics of spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in V1 of awake mice

Quentin Perrenoud, Cyriel M. A. Pennartz & Luc J. Gentet
Cortical gamma activity (30–80 Hz) is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV) and pyramidal cells (PYRs). However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unclear. Here, we characterized the intracellular dynamics of PVs and PYRs during spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in layers 2/3 of V1 of awake mice using targeted patch-clamp recordings and synchronous local field...

Data from: Fluctuating food resources influence developmental plasticity in wild boar

Marlène Gamelon, Mathieu Douhard, Eric Baubet, Olivier Gimenez, Serge Brandt, Jean-Michel Gaillard & J.-M. Gaillard
To maximize long-term average reproductive success, individuals can diversify the phenotypes of offspring produced within a reproductive event by displaying the ‘coin-flipping’ tactic. Wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) females have been reported to adopt this tactic. However, whether the magnitude of developmental plasticity within a litter depends on stochasticity in food resources has not been yet investigated. From long-term monitoring, we found that juvenile females produced similar-sized fetuses within a litter independent of food availability....

Data from: Does multiple paternity explain phenotypic variation among offspring in wild boar?

Marlène Gamelon, Thibault Gayet, Eric Baubet, Sébastien Devillard, Ludovic Say, Serge Brandt, Christophe Pélabon & Bernt-Erik Sæther
During pregnancy, littermates compete to extract maternal resources from the placenta. Unequal extraction of resources leads to developmental differences among offspring and thus within-litter variation in offspring mass. Because competition among littermates can be stronger among half-sibs, multiple paternity may represent an adaptive strategy allowing females to increase within-litter phenotypic variation among offspring when facing variable environments. Wild boar (Sus scrofa) females produce large litters with diversified offspring in terms of body mass. Additionally, multiple...

Data from: Timetree of Aselloidea reveals species diversification dynamics in groundwater

Claire Morvan, Florian Malard, Emmanuel Paradis, Tristan Lefébure, Lara Konecny-Dupré & Christophe J. Douady
A key challenge for biologists is to document and explain global patterns of diversification in a wide range of environments. Here, we explore patterns of continental-scale diversification in a groundwater species-rich clade, the superfamily Aselloidea (Pancrustacea: Isopoda). Our analyses supported a constant diversification rate during most of the course of Aselloidea evolution, until 4–15 Ma when diversification rates started to decrease. This constant accumulation of lineages challenges the view that groundwater species diversification in temperate...

Pathogen-mediated selection favours the maintenance of innate immunity gene polymorphism in a widespread wild ungulate

Erwan Quéméré, Pauline Hessenauer, Maxime Galan, Marie Fernandez, Joël Merlet, Yannick Chaval, Nicolas Morellet, Hélène Verheyden, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont & Nathalie Charbonnel
Toll-like Receptors (TLR) play a central role in recognition and host frontline defence against a wide range of pathogens. A number of recent studies have shown that TLR genes (Tlrs) often exhibit large polymorphism in natural populations. Yet, there is little knowledge on how this polymorphism is maintained and how it influences disease susceptibility in the wild. In previous work, we showed that some Tlrs exhibit similarly high levels of genetic diversity as genes of...

Data from: Demographic processes shaping genetic variation of the solitarious phase of the desert locust

Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Christophe Plantamp, Laurence Blondin, Christine Pagès, Jean-Michel Vassal & Michel Lecoq
Between plagues, the solitarious desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) is generally thought to exist as small populations, which are particularly prone to extinction events in arid regions of Africa and Asia. Given the high genetic structuring observed in one geographical area (the Eritrean coast) by former authors, a metapopulation dynamics model involving repeated extinction and colonization events was favored. In this study, we assessed the validity of a demographic scenario involving temporary populations of the solitarious...

Data from: The cryptic and the apparent reversed: lack of genetic differentiation within the morphologically diverse plexus of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer

Frederic Quillevere, Aurore André, Agnes Weiner, Ralf Aurahs, Raphaël Morard, Christophe J. Douady, Thibault De Garidel-Thoron, Gilles Escarguel, Colomban De Vargas & Michal Kucera
Previous genetic studies of extant planktonic foraminifera have provided evidence that the traditional, strictly morphological definition of species in these organisms underestimates their biodiversity. Here, we report the first case where this pattern is reversed. The modern (sub)tropical species plexus Globigerinoides sacculifer is characterized by large morphological variability, which has led to the proliferation of taxonomic names attributed to morphological end-members within the plexus. In order to clarify the taxonomic status of its morphotypes and...

Data from: Influence of oxidative homeostasis on bacterial density and cost of infection in Drosophila–Wolbachia symbioses

David Monnin, Natacha Kremer, Clément Berny, Hélène Henri, Adeline Dumet, Yann Voituron, Emmanuel Desouhant & Fabrice Vavre
The evolution of symbioses along the continuum between parasitism and mutualism can be influenced by the oxidative homeostasis, i.e. the balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant molecules. Indeed, ROS can contribute to the host immune defence to regulate symbiont populations, but are also toxic. This interplay between ROS and symbiosis is notably exemplified by recent results in arthropod-Wolbachia interactions. Wolbachia are symbiotic bacteria involved in a wide range of interactions with their arthropods...

Data from: The cost of growing large: sex-specific costs of post-weaning growth on body mass senescence in a wild mammal

Frédéric Douhard, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Maryline Pellerin, Laurent Jacob & Jean-François Lemaître
Individual body mass often positively correlates with survival and reproductive success, whereas fitness costs of growing large are rarely detected in vertebrates in the wild. Evidence that adult body mass progressively declines with increasing age is accumulating across mammalian populations. Growing fast to a large body can increase the cellular damage accumulated throughout life, leading body growth in early life to be negatively associated with the rate of body mass senescence. Moreover, the onset of...

Context dependent fitness costs of reproduction despite stable body mass costs in an Arctic herbivore

Gabriel Pigeon, Steve Albon, Leif Egil Loe, Richard Bischof, Christophe Bonenfant, Mads Farchhammer, Justine Irvine, Erik Ropstad, Vebjorn Veiberg & Audun Stein
1. The cost of reproduction on demographic rates is often assumed to operate through changing body condition. Several studies have found that reproduction depresses body mass more if the current conditions are severe, such as high population densities or adverse weather, than under benign environmental conditions. However, few studies have investigated the association between the fitness and body mass costs of reproduction. 2. Using 25 years of individual-based capture-recapture data from Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus...

Data from: Multiple mating in the context of interspecific hybridization between two Tetramorium ant species

Marion Cordonnier, Gilles Escarguel, Adeline Dumet & Bernard Kaufmann
In eusocial Hymenoptera, haplodiploidy and polyandry may facilitate selection for hybridization. Interspecific hybridization is widespread in ants and can lead to hybrid inviability as well as the formation of new species through hybrid speciation. However, in ants, polyandry is uncommon. By analyzing microsatellite markers on 15 ant workers per colony, we show that the mating system of 28 pure colonies of Tetramorium immigrans, 15 pure colonies of Tetramorium caespitum and 27 hybrid colonies is a...

Effects of high and low-efficacy therapy in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

Izanne Roos, Emmanuelle Leray, Romain Casey, Dana Horakova, Eva Havrdova, Guillermo Izquierdo, Sara Eichau, Francesco Patti, Gilles Edan, Marc Debouverie, Jean Pelletier, Serkan Ozakbas, Maria Pia Amato, Pierre Clavelou, Pierre Grammond, Cavit Boz, Katherine Buzzard, Olga Skibina, Jonathan Ciron, Oliver Gerlach, Francois Grand'Maison, Jeannette Lechner-Scott, Charles Malpas, Helmut Butzkueven, Sandra Vukusic … & Tomas Kalincik
Objective: To compare the clinical effectiveness of high- and low-efficacy treatments in patients with recently active and inactive secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) after accounting for therapeutic lag. Methods: Patients treated with high- (natalizumab, alemtuzumab, mitoxantrone, ocrelizumab, rituximab, cladribine, fingolimod) or low-efficacy (interferon β, glatiramer acetate, teriflunomide) therapies after SPMS onset were selected from MSBase and OFSEP, two large observational cohorts. Therapeutic lag was estimated for each patient based on their demographic and clinical characteristics....

Alternative developmental and transcriptomic responses to host plant water limitation in a butterfly metapopulation

Aapo Kahilainen, Vicencio Oostra, Panu Somervuo, Guillaume Minard & Marjo Saastamoinen
The dataset is from a study examining the effects of host plant water stress on the developmental and transcriptomic responses of its specialist Lepidopteran herbivore. The study combines host plant metabolic profiling with development assays and full-transcriptome sequencing of herbivore larvae. First, we profiled metabolic differences between well-watered and water-limited ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR). Second, we tested how performance of developing Glanville fritillary (Melitaea cinxia) larvae was affected...

Data from: A non-lethal sampling method to obtain, generate and assemble whole-blood transcriptomes from small, wild mammals

Zixia Huang, Aurore Gallot, Nga T. Lao, Sébastien J. Puechmaille, Nicole M. Foley, David Jebb, Michaël Bekaert & Emma C. Teeling
The acquisition of tissue samples from wild populations is a constant challenge in conservation biology, especially for endangered species and protected species where nonlethal sampling is the only option. Whole blood has been suggested as a nonlethal sample type that contains a high percentage of bodywide and genomewide transcripts and therefore can be used to assess the transcriptional status of an individual, and to infer a high percentage of the genome. However, only limited quantities...

Data from: Spatiotemporal spike coding of behavioral adaptation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex

Laureline Logiaco, René Quilodran, Emmanuel Procyk & Angelo Arleo
The frontal cortex controls behavioral adaptation in environments governed by complex rules. Many studies have established the relevance of firing rate modulation after informative events signaling whether and how to update the behavioral policy. However, whether the spatiotemporal features of these neuronal activities contribute to encoding imminent behavioral updates remains unclear. We investigated this issue in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) of monkeys while they adapted their behavior based on their memory of feedback...

Data from: Movement is the glue connecting home ranges and habitat selection

Bram Van Moorter, Christer M. Rolandsen, Mathieu Basille & Jean-Michel Gaillard
1. Animal space use has been studied by focusing either on geographic (e.g. home ranges, species' distribution) or on environmental (e.g. habitat use and selection) space. However, all patterns of space use emerge from individual movements, which are the primary means by which animals change their environment. 2. Individuals increase their use of a given area by adjusting two key movement components: the duration of their visit and/or the frequency of revisits. Thus, in spatially...

Data from: Life histories and conservation of long-lived reptiles, an illustration with the American Crocodile (Crocodylus acutus)

Venetia Briggs-Gonzalez, Christophe Bonenfant, Mathieu Basille, Michael Cherkiss, Jeff Beauchamp & Frank Mazzotti
1. Successful species conservation is dependent on adequate estimates of population dynamics, but age-specific demographics are generally lacking for long-lived iteroparous species. Accurate demographic information allows estimation of population growth rate, as well as projection of future population sizes and quantitative analyses of fitness trade-offs involved in evolution of life-history strategies. 2. Here, a long-term capture-recapture study was conducted from 1978-2014 on the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) in southern Florida. Over the study period, 7,427...

Data from: Genome-wide analysis of allele frequency change in sunflower crop-wild hybrid populations evolving under natural conditions

Jonathan Corbi, Eric J. Baack, Jennifer M. Dechaine, Gerald Seiler & John M. Burke
Crop-wild hybridization occurs in numerous plant species, and could alter the genetic structure and evolutionary dynamics of wild populations. Studying crop-derived alleles in wild populations is also relevant to assessing/mitigating the risks associated with transgene escape. To date, crop-wild hybridization has generally been examined via short-term studies, typically within a single generation, focusing on few traits or genetic markers. Little is known about patterns of selection on crop-derived alleles over multiple generations, particularly at a...

Data from: Microsatellite evolutionary rate and pattern in Schistocerca gregaria inferred from direct observation of germline mutations

Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Christophe Plantamp, Réjane Streiff, Laurence Blondin, Cyril Piou & M.-P. Chapuis
Unravelling variation among taxonomic orders regarding the rate of evolution in microsatellites is crucial for evolutionary biology and population genetics research. The mean mutation rate of microsatellites tends to be lower in arthropods than in vertebrates, but data are scarce and mostly concern accumulation of mutations in model species. Based on parent-offspring segregations and a hierarchical Bayesian model, the mean rate of mutation in the orthopteran insect Schistocerca gregaria was estimated at 2.1e-4 per generation...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny of the highly diversified catfish subfamily Loricariinae (Siluriformes, Loricariidae) reveals incongruences with morphological classification

Raphaël Covain, Sonia Fisch-Muller, Claudio Oliveira, Jan H. Mol, Juan I. Montoya-Burgos & Stéphane Dray
The Loricariinae belong to the Neotropical mailed catfish family Loricariidae, the most species-rich catfish family. Among loricariids, members of the Loricariinae are united by a long and flattened caudal peduncle and the absence of an adipose fin. Despite numerous studies of the Loricariidae, there is no comprehensive phylogeny of this morphologically highly diversified subfamily. To fill this gap, we present a molecular phylogeny of this group, including 350 representatives, based on the analysis of mitochondrial...

Data from: Combining familiarity and landscape features helps break down the barriers between movements and home ranges in a non-territorial large herbivore

Pascal Marchand, Mathieu Garel, Gilles Bourgoin, Antoine Duparc, Dominique Dubray, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Recent advances in animal ecology have enabled identification of certain mechanisms that lead to the emergence of territories and home ranges from movements considered as unbounded. Among them, memory and familiarity have been identified as key parameters in cognitive maps driving animal navigation, but have been only recently used in empirical analyses of animal movements. At the same time, the influence of landscape features on movements of numerous species and on space division in territorial...

Data from: Early life expenditure in sexual competition is associated with increased reproductive senescence in male red deer

Jean-François Lemaître, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Josephine M. Pemberton, Tim H. Clutton-Brock, Daniel H. Nussey, J.-F. Lemaitre & J.-M. Gaillard
The evolutionary theories of senescence predict that investment in reproduction in early life should come at the cost of reduced somatic maintenance, and thus earlier or more rapid senescence. There is now growing support for such trade-offs in wild vertebrates, but these exclusively come from females. Here, we test this prediction in male red deer (Cervus elaphus) using detailed longitudinal data collected over a 40-year field study. We show that males which had larger harems...

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