99 Works

Data from: Evaluating interspecific niche overlaps in environmental and geographic spaces to assess the value of umbrella species

Yoan Fourcade, Aurélien G. Besnard & Jean Secondi
The concept of umbrella species assumes that concentrating resources on the protection of a single species contributes to the conservation of a suite of species and ecological processes belonging to the same ecosystem. The environmental requirements and geographical distribution of the umbrella species should thus overlap those of the group of targeted species. In western France, the conservation of several large grassland floodplains relies on agri-environmental schemes targeting one single bird species, the corncrake Crex...

Data from: Diversity in morphology and locomotory behavior is associated with niche expansion in the semi-aquatic bugs

Antonin J. J. Crumière, M. Emilia Santos, Marie Sémon, David Armisén, Felipe F. F. Moreira & Abderrahman Khila
Acquisition of new ecological opportunities is a major driver of adaptation and species diversification [ 1–4 ]. However, how groups of organisms expand their habitat range is often unclear [ 3 ]. We study the Gerromorpha, a monophyletic group of heteropteran insects that occupy a large variety of water surface-associated niches, from small puddles to open oceans [ 5, 6 ]. Due to constraints related to fluid dynamics [ 7–9 ] and exposure to predation...

Data from: Is diversification history of maize influencing selection of soil bacteria by roots?

Marie-Lara Bouffaud, Martina Kyselková, Brigitte Gouesnard, Genevieve Grundmann, Daniel Muller & Yvan Moënne-Loccoz
A wide range of plant lines has been propagated by farmers during crop selection and dissemination, but consequences of this crop diversification on plant-microbe interactions have been neglected. Our hypothesis was that crop evolutionary history shaped the way the resulting lines interact with soil bacteria in their rhizospheres. Here, the significance of maize diversification as a factor influencing selection of soil bacteria by seedling roots was assessed by comparing rhizobacterial community composition of inbred lines...

Data from: Effects of interspecific coexistence on laying date and clutch size in two closely related species of hole‐nesting birds

Anders Pape Møller, Javier Balbontin, André A. Dhondt, Vladimir Remeš, Frank Adriaensen, Clotilde Biard, Jordi Camprodon, Mariusz Cichoń, Blandine Doligez, Anna Dubiec, Marcel Eens, Tapio Eeva, Anne E. Goodenough, Andrew G. Gosler, Lars Gustafsson, Philipp Heeb, Shelley A. Hinsley, Staffan Jacob, Rimvydas Juškaitis, Toni Laaksonen, Bernard Leclercq, Bruno Massa, Tomasz D. Mazgajski, Rudi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson … & Ruedi G. Nager
Coexistence between great tits Parus major and blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus, but also other hole‐nesting taxa, constitutes a classic example of species co‐occurrence resulting in potential interference and exploitation competition for food and for breeding and roosting sites. However, the spatial and temporal variations in coexistence and its consequences for competition remain poorly understood. We used an extensive database on reproduction in nest boxes by great and blue tits based on 87 study plots across...

Data from: Circadian periodicity in space use by ungulates of temperate regions: how much, when, and why?

Guillaume Peron, Antoine Duparc, Mathieu Garel, Pascal Marchand, Nicolas Morellet, Sonia Said & Anne Loison
1. When they visit and revisit specific areas, animals may reveal what they need from their home range and how they acquire information. The temporal dimension of such movement recursions, i.e., periodicity, is however rarely studied, yet potentially bears a species, population, or individual-specific signature. 2. A recent method allows estimating the contribution of periodic patterns to the variance in a movement path. We applied it to 709 individuals from 5 ungulate species, looking for...

Data from: A branch-heterogeneous model of protein evolution for efficient inference of ancestral sequences

Mathieu Groussin, Bastien Boussau & Manolo Gouy
Most models of nucleotide or amino acid substitution used in phylogenetic studies assume that the evolutionary process has been homogeneous across lineages and that composition of nucleotides or amino acids has remained the same throughout the tree. These oversimplified assumptions are refuted by the observation that compositional variability characterizes extant biological sequences. Branch-heterogeneous models of protein evolution that account for compositional variability have been developed, but are not yet in common use because of the...

Data from: The dual nature of hemocyanin in the establishment and persistence of the squid-vibrio symbiosis

Natacha Kremer, Julia Schwartzman, René Augustin, Lawrence Zhou, Edward G. Ruby, Stéphane Hourdez & Margaret J. McFall-Ngai
We identified and sequenced from the squid Euprymna scolopes two isoforms of haemocyanin that share the common structural/physiological characteristics of haemocyanin from a closely related cephalopod, Sepia officinalis, including a pronounced Bohr effect. We examined the potential roles for haemocyanin in the animal's symbiosis with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Our data demonstrate that, as in other cephalopods, the haemocyanin is primarily synthesized in the gills. It transits through the general circulation into other tissues...

Data from: The use of MSR (Minimum Sample Richness) for sample assemblage comparisons

Kenny J. Travouillon, Gilles Escarguel, Serge Legendre, Michael Archer & Suzanne J. Hand
Minimum Sample Richness (MSR) is defined as the smallest number of taxa that must be recorded in a sample to achieve a given level of inter-assemblage classification accuracy. MSR is calculated from known or estimated richness and taxonomic similarity. Here we test MSR for strengths and weaknesses by using 167 published mammalian local faunas from the Paleogene and early Neogene of the Query and Liane area (Massif Central, southwestern France), and then apply MSR to...

Data from: Quantitative genetics of the use of conspecific and heterospecific social cues for breeding site choice

Jere Tolvanen, Sami Mikael Kivelä, Blandine Doligez, Jennifer Morinay, Lars Gustafsson, Piter Bijma, Veli-Matti Pakanen & Jukka T. Forsman
Social information use for decision-making is common and affects ecological and evolutionary processes, including social aggregation, species coexistence and cultural evolution. Despite increasing ecological knowledge on social information use, very little is known about its genetic basis and therefore its evolutionary potential. Genetic variation in a trait affecting an individual's social and non-social environment may have important implications for population dynamics, interspecific interactions and for expression of other, environmentally plastic traits. We estimated repeatability, additive...

Data from: Are human natal sex ratio differences across the world adaptive? A test of Fisher’s principle

Mathieu Douhard & Stéphane Dray
Fisher’s principle states that natural selection favours an equal number of male and female births at the population level, unless there are sex differences in rearing costs or sex differences in mortality before the end of the period of parental investment. Sex differences in rearing costs should be more pronounced in low- than in high-resource settings. We, therefore, examined whether human development index and sex differences in child mortality contribute to the natural variation in...

Strain diversity and spatial distribution are linked to epidemic dynamics in host populations

Jenalle Eck, Benoit Barrès, Samuel Soubeyrand, Jukka Siren, Elina Numminen & Anna-Liisa Laine
The inherently variable nature of epidemics renders predictions of when and where infection is expected to occur challenging. Differences in pathogen strain composition, diversity, fitness, and spatial distribution are generally ignored in epidemiological modeling and are rarely studied in natural populations, yet they may be important drivers of epidemic trajectories. To examine how these factors are linked to epidemics in natural host populations, we collected epidemiological and genetic data from fifteen populations of the powdery...

Mosquito-bacteria interactions during larval development trigger metabolic changes with carry-over effects on adult fitness

Louis Lambrechts, Emilie Giraud, Hugo Varet, Rachel Legendre, Odile Sismeiro, Fabien Aubry, Stéphanie Dabo, Laura Dickson & Claire Valiente Moro
In animals with distinct life stages such as holometabolous insects, adult phenotypic variation is often shaped by the environment of immature stages, including their interactions with microbes colonizing larval habitats. Such carry-over effects were previously observed for several adult traits of the mosquito Aedes aegypti after larval exposure to different bacteria, but the mechanistic underpinnings are unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular changes triggered by gnotobiotic larval exposure to different bacteria in Ae. aegypti. We...

Data from: A phylogenomic approach to vertebrate phylogeny supports a turtle-archosaur affinity and a possible paraphyletic Lissamphibia

Jonathan J. Fong, Jeremy M. Brown, Matthew K. Fujita & Bastien Boussau
In resolving the vertebrate tree of life, two fundamental questions remain: 1) what is the phylogenetic position of turtles within amniotes, and 2) what are the relationships between the three major lissamphibian (extant amphibian) groups? These relationships have historically been difficult to resolve, with five different hypotheses proposed for turtle placement, and four proposed branching patterns within Lissamphibia. We compiled a large cDNA/EST dataset for vertebrates (75 genes for 129 taxa) to address these outstanding...

Data from: Revisiting the link between breeding effort and oxidative balance through field evaluation of two sympatric sibling insect species

Benjamin Rey, Pierre-François Pélisson, Marie-Claude Bel-Venner, Yann Voituron & Samuel Venner
The idea that oxidative stress could be a major force governing evolutionary trade-offs has recently been challenged by experimental approaches in laboratory conditions triggering extensive debates centered on theoretical and methodological issues. Here, we revisited the link between oxidative stress and reproduction by measuring multiple antioxidant and oxidative damages in wild-caught females of two sibling weevil species (Curculio elephas, C. glandium). The strength of our study arises from: (1) studied species are sympatric and exploit...

Data from: Anatomy and affinities of a new 535-million-year-old medusozoan from the Kuanchuanpu Formation, South China

Xing Wang, Jian Han, Jean Vannier, Qiang Ou, Xiaoguang Yang, Kentaro Uesugi, Osamu Sasaki & Tsuyoshi Komiya
We describe here Sinaster petalon gen. et sp. nov., a new embryonic form from the c. 535 million-year-old Kuanchuanpu Formation of South China (Ningqiang, Shaanxi Province). The excellent three-dimensional, phosphatic preservation of these microfossils allowed us to use x-ray microtomographic techniques to make accurate reconstructions of their internal structures and to compare their anatomy point-by-point with that of extant cnidarians and other animal groups. Sinaster petalon has anatomical features typical of extant Medusozoa (Cnidaria), such...

Data from: Changes in horn size of Stone's sheep over four decades correlate with trophy hunting pressure

Mathieu Douhard, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Fanie Pelletier, Jean-Michel Gaillard & Christophe Bonenfant
Selective harvest may lead to rapid evolutionary change. For large herbivores, trophy hunting removes males with large horns. That artificial selection, operating in opposition to sexual selection, can lead to undesirable consequences for management and conservation. There have been no comparisons of long-term changes in trophy size under contrasting harvest pressures. We analyzed horn measurements of Stone's rams (Ovis dalli stonei) harvested over 37 years in two large regions of British Columbia, Canada, with marked...

Data from: Habitat-related variation in the plasticity of a UV sensitive photoreceptor over a small spatial scale in the palmate newt

Jean Secondi, Mélissa Martin, Delphine Goven, Pascal Mège, Stéphane Sourice & Marc Théry
Plastic phenotypes are expected to be favoured in heterogeneous environments compared with stable environments. Sensory systems are interesting to test this theory because they are costly to produce and support, and strong fitness costs are expected if they are not tuned to the local environment. Consistently, the visual system of several species changes with the conditions experienced during early development. However, there is little information on whether the amplitude of the change, i.e. the reaction...

Data from: Socially-mediated effects of climate change decrease survival of hibernating Alpine marmots

Célia Rezouki, Marion Tafani, Aurélie Cohas, Anne Loison, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Dominique Allainé & Christophe Bonenfant
1. In the context of global change, an increasing challenge is to understand the interaction between weather variables and life histories. Species-specific life histories should condition the way climate influences population dynamics, particularly those that are associated with environmental constraints, such as lifestyles like hibernation and sociality. However, the influence of lifestyle in the response of organisms to climate change remains poorly understood. 2. Based on a 23-year longitudinal study of the Alpine marmot, we...

Data from: How structured is the entangled bank? The surprisingly simple organization of multiplex ecological networks leads to increased persistence and resilience

Sonia Kéfi, Vincent Miele, Evie A. Wieters, Sergio A. Navarrete & Eric L. Berlow
Species are linked to each other by a myriad of positive and negative interactions. This complex spectrum of interactions constitutes a network of links that mediates ecological communities’ response to perturbations, such as exploitation and climate change. In the last decades, there have been great advances in the study of intricate ecological networks. We have, nonetheless, lacked both the data and the tools to more rigorously understand the patterning of multiple interaction types between species...

Data from: Postglacial recolonisation in a cold climate specialist in Western Europe: patterns of genetic diversity in the adder (Vipera berus) support the central-marginal hypothesis

Sylvain Ursenbacher, Michaël Guillon, Hervé Cubizolle, Andréaz Dupoué, Gabriel Blouin-Demers & Olivier Lourdais
Understanding the impact of postglacial recolonization on genetic diversity is essential in explaining current patterns of genetic variation. The central–marginal hypothesis (CMH) predicts a reduction in genetic diversity from the core of the distribution to peripheral populations, as well as reduced connectivity between peripheral populations. While the CMH has received considerable empirical support, its broad applicability is still debated and alternative hypotheses predict different spatial patterns of genetic diversity. Using microsatellite markers, we analysed the...

Data from: The influence of early-life allocation to antlers on male performance during adulthood: evidence from contrasted populations of a large herbivore

Jean-François Lemaître, Louise Cheynel, Frederic Douhard, Gilles Bourgoin, François Débias, Hubert Ferté, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Sylvia Pardonnet, Maryline Pellerin, Benjamin Rey, Cécile Vanpé, A.J. Mark Hewison, Jean-Michel Gaillard & A. J. Mark Hewison
1. To secure mating opportunities, males often develop and maintain conspicuous traits that are involved in intra-sexual and/or inter-sexual competition. While current models of sexual selection rely on the assumption that producing such traits is costly, quantifying the cost of allocating to secondary sexual traits remains challenging. 2. According to the principle of allocation, high energy allocation to growth or sexual traits in males should lead to reduced energy allocation to the maintenance of cellular...

Data from: On the equivalence of host local adaptation and parasite maladaptation: an experimental test

Mélissa Lemoine, Blandine Doligez & Heinz Richner
In spatio-temporally varying environments, host-parasite coevolution may lead to either host or parasite local adaptation. Using reciprocal infestations over 11 pairs of plots, we tested local adaptation in the hen flea and its main host, the great tit. Flea reproductive success (number of adult at host fledging) was lower on host individuals from the same plot compared to foreign hosts (from another plot), revealing flea local maladaptation. Host reproductive success (number of fledged young) was...

Data from: Is diversification history of maize influencing selection of soil bacteria by roots?

Marie-Lara Bouffaud, Martina Kyselková, Brigitte Gouesnard, Genevieve Grundmann, Daniel Muller & Yvan Moënne-Loccoz
A wide range of plant lines has been propagated by farmers during crop selection and dissemination, but consequences of this crop diversification on plant-microbe interactions have been neglected. Our hypothesis was that crop evolutionary history shaped the way the resulting lines interact with soil bacteria in their rhizospheres. Here, the significance of maize diversification as a factor influencing selection of soil bacteria by seedling roots was assessed by comparing rhizobacterial community composition of inbred lines...

Data from: The use of MSR (Minimum Sample Richness) for sample assemblage comparisons

Kenny J. Travouillon, Gilles Escarguel, Serge Legendre, Michael Archer & Suzanne J. Hand
Minimum Sample Richness (MSR) is defined as the smallest number of taxa that must be recorded in a sample to achieve a given level of inter-assemblage classification accuracy. MSR is calculated from known or estimated richness and taxonomic similarity. Here we test MSR for strengths and weaknesses by using 167 published mammalian local faunas from the Paleogene and early Neogene of the Query and Liane area (Massif Central, southwestern France), and then apply MSR to...

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