13 Works

Data from: Membrane potential dynamics of spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in V1 of awake mice

Quentin Perrenoud, Cyriel M. A. Pennartz & Luc J. Gentet
Cortical gamma activity (30–80 Hz) is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV) and pyramidal cells (PYRs). However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unclear. Here, we characterized the intracellular dynamics of PVs and PYRs during spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in layers 2/3 of V1 of awake mice using targeted patch-clamp recordings and synchronous local field...

Data from: Contemporary variations of immune responsiveness during range expansion of two invasive rodents in Senegal

Christophe Diagne, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Stéphane Cornet, Laëtitia Husse, Souleymane Doucouré, Ambroise Dalecky, Khalilou Bâ, Mamadou Kane, Youssoupha Niang, Mamoudou Diallo, Aliou Sow, Odile Fossati-Gaschignard, Sylvain Piry, Emmaneulle Artige, Mbacké Sembène, Carine Brouat, Nathalie Charbonnel & Emmanuelle Artige
Biological invasions provide unique opportunities for studying life history trait changes over contemporary time scales. As spatial spread may be related to changes in parasite communities, several hypotheses (such as the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) or EICA-refined hypotheses) suggest immune changes in invasive species along invasion gradients. Although native hosts may be subject to similar changes in parasite selection pressures, their immune responses have been rarely investigated in invasion contexts. In this study,...

Data from: Cohort variation in individual body mass dissipates with age in large herbivores

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Steve Albon, Steeve D. Côté, Joseph M. Craine, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Mathieu Garel, Phyllis Lee, Cynthia Moss, Daniel H. Nussey, Fanie Pelletier, Audun Stien & Torkild Tveraa
Environmental conditions experienced during early growth and development markedly shape phenotypic traits. Consequently, individuals of the same cohort may show similar life-history tactics throughout life. Conditions experienced later in life, however, could fine-tune these initial differences, either increasing (cumulative effect) or decreasing (compensatory effect) the magnitude of cohort variation with increasing age. Our novel comparative analysis that quantifies cohort variation in individual body size trajectories shows that initial cohort variation dissipates throughout life, and that...

Data from: Introduced Drosophila subobscura populations perform better than native populations during an oviposition choice task due to increased fecundity but similar learning ability

Julien Foucaud, Céline Moreno, Marta Pascual, Enrico L. Rezende, Luis E. Castañeda, Patricia Gibert & Frederic Mery
The success of invasive species is tightly linked to their fitness in a putatively novel environment. While quantitative components of fitness have been studied extensively in the context of invasive species, fewer studies have looked at qualitative components of fitness, such as behavioral plasticity, and their interaction with quantitative components, despite intuitive benefits over the course of an invasion. In particular, learning is a form of behavioral plasticity that makes it possible to finely tune...

Data from: The influence of weather conditions during gestation on life histories in a wild Arctic ungulate

Mathieu Douhard, Leif Egil Loe, Audun Stien, Christophe Bonenfant, R. Justin Irvine, Vebjørn Veiberg, Erik Ropstad & Steve Albon
The internal predictive adaptive response (internal PAR) hypothesis predicts that individuals born in poor conditions should start to reproduce earlier if they are likely to have reduced performance in later life. However, whether this is the case remains unexplored in wild populations. Here, we use longitudinal data from a long-term study of Svalbard reindeer to examine age-related changes in adult female life-history responses to environmental conditions experienced in utero as indexed by rain-on-snow (ROSutero). We...

Data from: On the evolutionary consequences of increasing litter size with multiple paternity in wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa)

Thibault Gayet, Sebastien Devillard, Marlène Gamelon, Serge Brandt, Ludovic Say & Eric Baubet
Understanding how some species may be able to evolve quickly enough to deal with anthropogenic pressure is of prime interest in evolutionary biology, conservation and management. Wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) populations keep growing all over Europe despite increasing hunting pressure. In wild boar populations subject to male-selective harvesting, the initially described polygynous mating system may switch to a promiscuous/polyandrous one. Such a change in the mating system, where potentially more males sire a litter...

Data from: Influence of oxidative homeostasis on bacterial density and cost of infection in Drosophila–Wolbachia symbioses

David Monnin, Natacha Kremer, Clément Berny, Hélène Henri, Adeline Dumet, Yann Voituron, Emmanuel Desouhant & Fabrice Vavre
The evolution of symbioses along the continuum between parasitism and mutualism can be influenced by the oxidative homeostasis, i.e. the balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant molecules. Indeed, ROS can contribute to the host immune defence to regulate symbiont populations, but are also toxic. This interplay between ROS and symbiosis is notably exemplified by recent results in arthropod-Wolbachia interactions. Wolbachia are symbiotic bacteria involved in a wide range of interactions with their arthropods...

Data from: Combining familiarity and landscape features helps break down the barriers between movements and home ranges in a non-territorial large herbivore

Pascal Marchand, Mathieu Garel, Gilles Bourgoin, Antoine Duparc, Dominique Dubray, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Recent advances in animal ecology have enabled identification of certain mechanisms that lead to the emergence of territories and home ranges from movements considered as unbounded. Among them, memory and familiarity have been identified as key parameters in cognitive maps driving animal navigation, but have been only recently used in empirical analyses of animal movements. At the same time, the influence of landscape features on movements of numerous species and on space division in territorial...

Data from: Genome scan reveals selection acting on genes linked to stress response in wild pearl millet

Cécile Berthouly-Salazar, Anne-Céline Thuillet, Bénédicte Rhoné, Cédric Mariac, Issaka Salia Ousseini, Marie Couderc, Maud I. Tenaillon & Yves Vigouroux
Uncovering genomic regions involved in adaption is a major goal in evolutionary biology. High-throughput sequencing now makes it possible to tackle this challenge in nonmodel species. Yet, despite the increasing number of methods targeted to specifically detect genomic footprints of selection, the complex demography of natural populations often causes high rates of false positive in gene discoveries. The aim of this study was to identify climate adaptations in wild pearl millet populations, Cenchrus americanus ssp....

Data from: Socially-mediated effects of climate change decrease survival of hibernating Alpine marmots

Célia Rezouki, Marion Tafani, Aurélie Cohas, Anne Loison, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Dominique Allainé & Christophe Bonenfant
1. In the context of global change, an increasing challenge is to understand the interaction between weather variables and life histories. Species-specific life histories should condition the way climate influences population dynamics, particularly those that are associated with environmental constraints, such as lifestyles like hibernation and sociality. However, the influence of lifestyle in the response of organisms to climate change remains poorly understood. 2. Based on a 23-year longitudinal study of the Alpine marmot, we...

Data from: Diversity in morphology and locomotory behavior is associated with niche expansion in the semi-aquatic bugs

Antonin J. J. Crumière, M. Emilia Santos, Marie Sémon, David Armisén, Felipe F. F. Moreira & Abderrahman Khila
Acquisition of new ecological opportunities is a major driver of adaptation and species diversification [ 1–4 ]. However, how groups of organisms expand their habitat range is often unclear [ 3 ]. We study the Gerromorpha, a monophyletic group of heteropteran insects that occupy a large variety of water surface-associated niches, from small puddles to open oceans [ 5, 6 ]. Due to constraints related to fluid dynamics [ 7–9 ] and exposure to predation...

Data from: Evaluating interspecific niche overlaps in environmental and geographic spaces to assess the value of umbrella species

Yoan Fourcade, Aurélien G. Besnard & Jean Secondi
The concept of umbrella species assumes that concentrating resources on the protection of a single species contributes to the conservation of a suite of species and ecological processes belonging to the same ecosystem. The environmental requirements and geographical distribution of the umbrella species should thus overlap those of the group of targeted species. In western France, the conservation of several large grassland floodplains relies on agri-environmental schemes targeting one single bird species, the corncrake Crex...

Data from: How structured is the entangled bank? The surprisingly simple organization of multiplex ecological networks leads to increased persistence and resilience

Sonia Kéfi, Vincent Miele, Evie A. Wieters, Sergio A. Navarrete & Eric L. Berlow
Species are linked to each other by a myriad of positive and negative interactions. This complex spectrum of interactions constitutes a network of links that mediates ecological communities’ response to perturbations, such as exploitation and climate change. In the last decades, there have been great advances in the study of intricate ecological networks. We have, nonetheless, lacked both the data and the tools to more rigorously understand the patterning of multiple interaction types between species...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • University of Lyon System
    13
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    5
  • Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage
    3
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    2
  • James Hutton Institute
    2
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • Lyon Neuroscience Research Center
    1
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    1
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    1
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    1