3 Works

Muscle systems and motility of early animals highlighted by cnidarians from the basal Cambrian

Xing Wang, Jean Vannier, Xiaoguang Yang, Lucas Leclère, Qiang Ou, Xikun Song, Tsuyoshi Komiya & Jian Han
Although fossil evidence suggests that various animal groups were able to move actively through their environment in the early stages of their evolution, virtually no direct information is available on the nature of their muscle systems. The origin of jellyfish swimming, for example, is of great interest to biologists. Exceptionally preserved muscles are described here in benthic peridermal olivooid medusozoans from the basal Cambrian of China (Kuanchuanpu Formation, ca. 535 Ma) that have direct equivalent...

Datafiles and code for Covas et al: The oxidative cost of helping and its minimisation in a cooperative breeder

Rita Covas, Sophie Lardy, Liliana Silva, Benjamin Rey, André Ferreira, Franck Theron, Arnaud Tognetti, Bruno Faivre & Claire Doutrelant
Cooperative actions are beneficial to the group, but presumably costly to the individual co-operators. In cooperatively breeding species, helping to raise young is thought to involve important energetic costs, which could lead to elevated exposure to reactive oxygen species, resulting in oxidative stress. However, identifying such costs can be difficult if individuals adjust their investment in helping in relation to environmental conditions or their own physiological condition. Experimental approaches are therefore required to quantify the...

Natal dispersal does not entail survival costs but is linked to breeding dispersal in a migratory shorebird, the southern dunlin Calidris alpina schinzii

Veli-Matti Pakanen, Veli-Matti Pakanen, Kari Koivula, Blandine Doligez, Lars-Åke Flodin, Angela Pauliny, Nelli Rönkä & Donald Blomqvist
The costs and benefits of dispersal are often assessed by comparing fitness between dispersing and non-dispersing individuals. Importantly, individuals that disperse between their natal and first breeding site may subsequently be more likely to disperse between breeding sites compared to those that remained philopatric to their natal site. Such within-individual consistency in dispersal behaviour can bias local survival estimation, and thus the survival comparison between dispersing and non-dispersing individuals, if breeding dispersal leads to permanent...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Lyon System
    3
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • University of Gothenburg
    1
  • Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology
    1
  • Sorbonne University
    1
  • Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse
    1
  • University of Oulu
    1
  • China University of Geosciences
    1
  • University of Tokyo
    1