77 Works

Drakaea glyptodon nuclear microsatellite and chloroplast haplotype data

Dorset Trapnell, Patrick Smallwood, Kingsley Dixon & Ryan Phillips
Many orchids are characterized by small, patchily distributed populations. Resolving how they persist is important for understanding the ecology of this hyper-diverse family, many members of which are of conservation concern. Ten populations of the common terrestrial orchid Drakaea glyptodon from Southwest Australia were genotyped with ten nuclear and five chloroplast SSR markers. Levels and partitioning of genetic variation, and effective population sizes (Ne), were estimated. Spatial genetic structure of nuclear diversity, together with chloroplast...

Data from: An experimental evaluation of traits that influence the sexual behaviour of pollinators in sexually deceptive orchids

Ryan D. Phillips & Rod Peakall
Pollination by sexual deception of male insects is perhaps one of the most remarkable cases of mimicry in the plant kingdom. However, understanding the influence of floral traits on pollinator behaviour in sexually deceptive orchids is challenging, due to the risk of confounding changes in floral odour when manipulating morphology. Here, we investigated the floral traits influencing the sexual response of male Zaspilothynnus nigripes (Tiphiidae) wasps, a pollinator of two distantly related sexually deceptive orchids...

Data from: Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet

Yuko Mabuchi & Theresa L. Frankel
Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune...

Data from: Australian spiny mountain crayfish and their temnocephalan ectosymbionts: an ancient association on the edge of coextinction?

Jennifer F. Hoyal Cuthill, Kim B. Sewell, Lester R. G. Cannon, Michael A. Charleston, Susan Lawler, D. Timothy J. Littlewood, Peter D. Olson & David Blair
Australian spiny mountain crayfish (Euastacus, Parastacidae) and their ecotosymbiotic temnocephalan flatworms (Temnocephalida, Platyhelminthes) may have co-occurred and interacted through deep time, during a period of major environmental change. Therefore, reconstructing the history of their association is of evolutionary, ecological, and conservation significance. Here, time-calibrated Bayesian phylogenies of Euastacus species and their temnocephalans (Temnohaswellia and Temnosewellia) indicate near-synchronous diversifications from the Cretaceous. Statistically significant cophylogeny correlations between associated clades suggest linked evolutionary histories. However, there is...

Data from: Maternal corticosterone exposure has transgenerational effects on grand-offspring

Nicola Khan, Richard A. Peters, Emily Richardson & Kylie A. Robert
The hormone fluctuations that an animal experiences during ovulation can have lifelong effects on developing offspring. These hormones may act as an adaptive mechanism, allowing offspring to be ‘pre-programmed’ to survive in an unstable environment. Here, we used a transgenerational approach to examine the effects of elevated maternal corticosterone (CORT) on the future reproductive success of female offspring. We show that female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) exposed to embryonic CORT produce daughters that have equal...

Data from: Outlier SNPs detect weak regional structure against a background of genetic homogeneity in the Eastern Rock Lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi

Laura N. Woodings, Nicholas P. Murphy, Stephen R. Doyle, Nathan E. Hall, Andrew J. Robinson, Geoffrey W. Liggins, Bridget S. Green, Ira R. Cooke, James J. Bell & Jan M. Strugnell
Genetic differentiation is characteristically weak in marine species making assessments of population connectivity and structure difficult. However the advent of genomic methods have increased genetic resolution, enabling studies to detect weak, but significant population differentiation within marine species. With an increasing number of studies employing high resolution genome-wide techniques, we are realising the connectivity of marine populations is often complex and quantifying this complexity can provide an understanding of the processes shaping marine species genetic...

Data from: Avian predation intensity as a driver of clinal variation in colour morph frequency

Genevieve Matthews, Celine T. Goulet, Kaspar Delhey, Zak S. Atkins, Geoffrey M. While, Michael G. Gardner & David G. Chapple
1) Phenotypic variation provides the framework for natural selection to work upon, enabling adaptive evolution. One of the most discernible manifestations of phenotypic variability is colour variation. When this variation is discrete, genetically-based colour pattern morphs occur simultaneously within a population. 2) Why and how colour polymorphisms are maintained is an evolutionary puzzle. Several evolutionary drivers have been hypothesized as influencing clinal patterns of morph frequency, with spatial variation in climate and predation being considered...

Data from: Faunal community consequence of interspecific bark trait dissimilarity in early-stage decomposing logs

Juan Zuo, Matty Berg, Roy Klein, Jasper Nusselder, Gert Neurink, Orsi Decker, Mariet M. Hefting, Ute Sass-Klaassen, Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn, Leo Goudzwaard, Jurgen Van Hal, Frank J. Sterck, Lourens Poorter, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen & Matty P. Berg
Dead tree trunks have significant ecosystem functions related to biodiversity and biogeochemical cycles. When lying on the soil surface, they are colonized by an array of invertebrate fauna, but what determines their community composition is still unclear. We apply community assembly theory to colonization of tree logs by invertebrates. During early decomposition, the attached bark is critically important as an environment filter for community assembly through habitat provision. Specifically, we hypothesized that the more dissimilar...

Data from: Tree-hugging koalas demonstrate a novel thermoregulatory mechanism for arboreal mammals

Natalie J. Briscoe, Kathrine A. Handasyde, Stephen R. Griffiths, Warren P. Porter, Andrew Krockenberger & Michael R. Kearney
How climate impacts organisms depends not only on their physiology, but also whether they can buffer themselves against climate variability via their behaviour. One of the way species can withstand hot temperatures is by seeking out cool microclimates, but only if their habitat provides such refugia. Here, we describe a novel thermoregulatory strategy in an arboreal mammal, the koala Phascolarctos cinereus. During hot weather, koalas enhanced conductive heat loss by seeking out and resting against...

Data from: Patterns and drivers of aquatic invertebrate diversity across an arid biome

Jenny Davis, Lien Sim, Ross M. Thompson, Adrian Pinder, Jayne Brim Box, Nick P. Murphy, Fran Sheldon, Alejandra Morán-Ordóñez, Paul Sunnucks & Nicholas P. Murphy
Managing and restoring faunal diversity across large areas requires an understanding of the roles of connectivity and dispersal in driving community patterns. We sought to determine the influence of connectivity, water regime, water source, geographical location, and dispersal traits on patterns of aquatic invertebrate diversity across a continent-wide arid biome. We compiled data on freshwater invertebrate assemblages from sites spanning the breadth of arid Australia. Univariate analyses (analysis of variance and rarefaction) revealed that alpha...

Data from: Development of a protocol for environmental impact studies using causal modelling

Rezvan Hatami
1- The global issue of water scarcity caused by climate change and human utilisation highlights the importance of an efficient assessment of water quality in freshwater systems. One of the challenges facing water management in environmental impact studies is the difficulty of inferring causality in complex systems. Traditional water assessment methods are inadequate because they are challenged to separate natural variation from the effect of human activities. 2- Knowing the causal structure of a complex...

The Hydroperoxyl Radical Scavenging Activity of Sulfuretin: Insights from Theory

Quan Vo, Nguyen Thi Hoa, Do Thi My Hang, Do Phu Hieu, Huynh Van Truong, Loc Phuoc Hoang & Adam Mechler
This dataset contains data from the calculations described in the paper: “Nguyen Thi Hoa, Do Thi My Hang, Do Phu Hieu, Huynh Van Truong, Loc Phuoc Hoang, Adam Mechler and Quan V. Vo*. (2021), The Hydroperoxyl Radical Scavenging Activity of Sulfuretin: Insights from Theory. Royal Society Open Science. 2021. The thermodynamic and kinetic calculations were applied to evaluate the HOO· radical scavenging activity of sulfuretin (SFR) in the gas phase and solvents (water and pentyl...

Data for: Substantial intraspecific trait variation across a hydrological gradient in northern Australian fishes

Osmar Luiz, Julian Olden, Mark Kennard, David Crook, Michael Douglas, Thor Saunders, Dion Wedd, Brendan Adair & Alison King
Trait-based models of ecological communities and ecosystem functioning often fail to account for intraspecific variation in functional traits, assuming that intraspecific variability is negligible compared to interspecific variability. However, this assumption remains poorly tested across vertebrate animals where past studies routinely describe species according to mean trait values without explicit consideration of individual trait variability. We assessed nine functional traits for 4,254 individuals belonging to 15 freshwater fish species from 11 families in Northern Australia,...

Theoretical insights into the antiradical activity and copper-catalyzed oxidative damage of mexidol in the physiological environment

Quan V. Vo, Nguyen Thi Hoa, Mai Van Bay & Adam Mechler
This dataset contains data from the calculations described in the paper: “Quan V. Vo*, Nguyen Thi Hoa, Mai Van Bay, Adam Mechler, Theoretical insights into the antiradical activity and copper-catalyzed oxidative damage of mexidol in the physiological environment. Royal Society Open Science. 2021. In this study, the hydroperoxyl radical scavenging activity of MD was studied to establish baseline antioxidant activity, followed by an investigation of the effect of MD on the copper-catalyzed oxidative damage in...

Data from: Enhancing plant diversity in a novel grassland using seed addition

Tara J. Zamin, Alex Jolly, Steve Sinclair, John W. Morgan & Joslin L. Moore
1.Restoration of novel ecosystems to a historical benchmark may not always be possible or advisable. Novel ecosystems may be managed by targeting specific components and accepting the novelty of other ecosystem attributes. The feasibility of this component-wise management of novel ecosystems has rarely been tested. 2.In a novel grassland, where C3 grasses have replaced C4 grasses, nutrients have been elevated, and diversity has been lost due to a history of agricultural land use, we aimed...

Data from: Assessing the sensitivity of biodiversity indices used to inform fire management

Katherine M. Giljohann, Luke T. Kelly, Jemima Connell, Michael F. Clarke, Rohan H. Clarke, Tracey J. Regan & Michael A. McCarthy
Biodiversity indices are widely used to summarise changes in the distribution and abundance of multiple species and measure progress towards management targets. However, the sensitivity of biodiversity indices to the data, landscape classification and conservation values underpinning them are rarely interrogated. There are limited studies to help scientists and land managers use biodiversity indices in the presence of fire and vegetation succession. The geometric mean of species’ relative abundance or occurrence (G) is a biodiversity...

Data from: Use of a rostral appendage during social interactions in the Ecuadorian Anolis proboscis

Diego R. Quirola, Andrés Mármol, Omar Torres-Carvajal, Andrea Narvaez, Fernando Ayala-Varela & Ignacio T. Moore
The use of sexually selected characters in inter- and intra-sexual interactions has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists. Recently, a distinction between sexually selected traits as ornaments versus weapons has been advanced. We investigated the behaviour of an enigmatic lizard with a prominent sexually dimorphic trait in an effort to describe whether the trait was the product of sexual selection and further whether it functioned as a weapon or an ornament. The subject of...

Fire, drought and flooding rains: the effect of climatic extremes on bird species’ responses to time since fire

Jemima Connell, Mark Hall, Dale Nimmo, Simon Watson & Michael Clarke
Aim: Climatic extremes and fire affect ecosystems across the globe, yet our understanding of how species are influenced by the interaction of these broad-scale ecological drivers is poorly understood. Using a ten-year dataset, we tested how extreme drought and rainfall interacted with time since fire (TSF) to shape bird species’ distributions. Location: Semi-arid mallee woodlands of south-eastern Australia. Methods: We quantified the effects of climatic extremes on bird species’ occurrence, species richness and incidence at...

Data from: Polyceraty (multi-horns) in Damara sheep maps to ovine chromosome 2

Ockert F. C. Greyvenstein, Coralie M. Reich, Este Van Marle-Koster, David G. Riley & Ben J. Hayes
Polyceraty (presence of multiple horns) is rare in modern day ungulates. Although not found in wild sheep, polyceraty does occur in a small number of domestic sheep breeds covering a wide geographical region. Damara are fat-tailed hair sheep, from the south-western region of Africa, which display polyceraty, with horn number ranging from zero to four. We conducted a genome-wide association study for horn number with 43 Damara genotyped with 606 006 SNP markers. The analysis...

Data from: Signatures of polygenic adaptation associated with climate across the range of a threatened fish species with high genetic connectivity

Katherine A. Harrisson, Stephen J. Amish, Alexandra Pavlova, Shawn R. Narum, Marina Telonis-Scott, Meaghan L. Rourke, Jarod Lyon, Zeb Tonkin, Dean M. Gilligan, Brett A. Ingram, Mark Lintermans, Han Ming Gan, Christopher M. Austin, Gordon Luikart & Paul Sunnucks
Adaptive differences across species’ ranges can have important implications for population persistence and conservation management decisions. Despite advances in genomic technologies, detecting adaptive variation in natural populations remains challenging. Key challenges in gene-environment association studies involve distinguishing the effects of drift from those of selection, and identifying subtle signatures of polygenic adaptation. We used paired-end restriction-site associated-DNA sequencing data (6605 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) to examine population structure and test for signatures of adaptation...

Data from: Is environmental legislation conserving tropical stream faunas? a large-scale assessment of local, riparian and catchment-scale influences on Amazonian stream fish

Cecília G. Leal, Jos Barlow, Toby Gardner, Robert M. Hughes, Rafael P. Leitão, Ralph Mac Nally, Philip R. Kaufmann, Silvio F. B. Ferraz, Jansen Zuanon, Felipe R. De Paula, Joice Ferreira, James R. Thomson, Gareth D. Lennox, Eurizângela P. Dary, Cristhiana P. Röpke, Paulo S. Pompeu & Toby A. Gardner
1.Agricultural expansion and intensification are major threats to tropical biodiversity. In addition to the direct removal of native vegetation, agricultural expansion often elicits other human-induced disturbances, many of which are poorly addressed by existing environmental legislation and conservation programmes. This is particularly true for tropical freshwater systems, where there is considerable uncertainty about whether a legislative focus on protecting riparian vegetation is sufficient to conserve stream fauna. 2.To assess the extent to which stream fish...

Data from: Effectiveness of camera traps for quantifying daytime and nighttime visitation by vertebrate pollinators

Siegfried L. Krauss, David G. Roberts, Ryan D. Phillips & Caroline Edwards
1. Identification of pollen vectors is a fundamental objective of pollination biology. The foraging and social behavior of these pollinators has profound effects on plant mating, making quantification of their behaviour critical for understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of different pollinators for the plants they visit. However, accurate quantification of visitation may be problematic, especially for shy animals and/or when the temporal and spatial scale of observation desired is large. Sophisticated heat- and movement-triggered...

Data from: Temporal genetic patterns of diversity and structure evidence sweepstakes in reproductive success of a spiny lobster

Cecilia Villacorta-Rath, Carla A. Souza, Nicholas P. Murphy, Bridget S. Green, Caleb Gardner & Jan M. Strugnell
Population structure of many marine organisms is spatially patchy and varies within and between years, a phenomenon defined as chaotic genetic patchiness. This results from the combination of planktonic larval dispersal and environmental stochasticity. Additionally, in species with bi-partite life, post-settlement selection can magnify these genetic differences. The high fecundity (up to 500,000 eggs annually) and protracted larval duration (12-24 months) and dispersal of the southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, make it a good test...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: A global database and ‘state of the field’ review of research into ecosystem engineering by land animals.

Nicole V. Coggan, Matthew W. Hayward & Heloise Gibb
1. Ecosystem engineers have been widely studied for terrestrial systems, but global trends in research encompassing the range of taxa and functions have not previously been synthesised. 2. We synthesised contemporary understanding of engineer fauna in terrestrial habitats and assessed the methods used to document patterns and processes, asking: 1.Which species act as ecosystem engineers and with whom do they interact? 2. What are the impacts of ecosystem engineers in terrestrial habitats and how are...

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