12 Works

Data from: Learning outdoors: Male lizards show flexible spatial learning under semi-natural conditions

Daniel W. A. Noble, Pau Carazo & Martin J. Whiting
Spatial cognition is predicted to be a fundamental component of fitness in many lizard species, and yet some studies suggest that it is relatively slow and inflexible. However, such claims are based on work conducted using experimental designs or in artificial contexts that may underestimate their cognitive abilities. We used a biologically realistic experimental procedure (using simulated predatory attacks) to study spatial learning and its flexibility in the lizard Eulamprus quoyii in semi-natural outdoor enclosures...

Data from: Species tree of a recent radiation: the subfamily Delphininae (Cetacea, Mammalia)

Ana R. Amaral, Jennifer A. Jackson, Luciana M. Moller, Luciano B. Beheregaray & M. Manuela Coelho
Lineages undergoing rapid radiations provide exceptional opportunities for studying speciation and adaptation, but also represent a challenge for molecular systematics because retention of ancestral polymorphisms and the occurrence of hybridization can obscure relationships among lineages. Dolphins in the subfamily Delphininae are one such case. Non-monophyly, rapid speciation events, and discordance between morphological and molecular characters have made the inference of phylogenetic relationships within this subfamily very difficult. Here we approach this problem by applying multiple...

Data from: Natural selection in the water: freshwater invasion and adaptation by water color in the Amazonian pufferfish

Georgina M. Cooke, Ning L. Chao & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Natural selection and ecological adaptation are ultimately responsible for much of the origin of biodiversity. Yet the identification of divergent natural selection has been hindered by the spatial complexity of natural systems, the difficulty in identifying genes under selection and their relationship to environment, and the confounding genomic effects of time. Here we employed genome scans, population genetics and sequence-based phylogeographic methods to identify divergent natural selection on population boundaries in a freshwater invader, the...

Data from: The energetics of life on the deep seafloor

Craig R. McClain, Andrew P. Allen, Derek P. Tittensor & Michael A. Rex
With frigid temperatures and virtually no in situ productivity, the deep oceans, Earth’s largest ecosystem, are especially energy-deprived systems. Our knowledge of the effects of this energy limitation on all levels of biological organization is very incomplete. Here we use the Metabolic Theory of Ecology to examine the relative roles of carbon flux and temperature in influencing metabolic rate, growth rate, lifespan, body size, abundance, biomass, and biodiversity for life on the deep seafloor. We...

Data from: Building genetic networks using relatedness information: a novel approach for the estimation of dispersal and characterization of group structure in social animals

Lee Ann Rollins, Lucy E. Browning, Clare E. Holleley, James L. Savage, Andrew F. Russell & Simon C. Griffith
Natal dispersal is an important life history trait driving variation in individual fitness and, therefore, a proper understanding of the factors underlying dispersal behaviour is critical to many fields including population dynamics, behavioural ecology and conservation biology. However, individual dispersal patterns remain difficult to quantify despite many years of research using direct and indirect methods. Here, we quantify dispersal in a single intensively-studied population of the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps) using genetic networks...

Data from: Kin selection, not group augmentation, predicts helping in an obligate cooperatively breeding bird

Lucy E. Browning, Samantha C. Patrick, Lee A. Rollins, Simon C. Griffith & Andrew F. Russell
Kin selection theory has been the central model for understanding the evolution of cooperative breeding, where non-breeders help bear the cost of rearing young. Recently the dominance of this idea has been questioned; particularly in obligate cooperative breeders where breeding without help is uncommon and seldom successful. In such systems, the direct benefits gained through augmenting current group size have been hypothesised to provide a tractable alternative (or addition) to kin selection. However, clear empirical...

Data from: Influences of past climatic changes on historical population structure and demography of a cosmopolitan marine predator, the common dolphin (genus Delphinus)

Ana Amaral, Luciano Beheregaray, Kerstin Bilgmann, Luís Freitas, Kelly Robertson, Marina Sequeira, Karen Stockin, M. M. Coelho & Luciana Möller
Climatic oscillations during the Pleistocene have greatly influenced the distribution and connectivity of many organisms, leading to extinctions but also generating biodiversity. While the effects of such changes have been extensively studied in the terrestrial environment, studies focusing on the marine realm are still scarce. Here we used sequence data from one mitochondrial and five nuclear loci to assess the potential influence of Pleistocene climatic changes on the phylogeography and demographic history of a cosmopolitan...

Data from: Divergent natural selection with gene flow along major environmental gradients in Amazonia: insights from genome scans, population genetics and phylogeography of the characin fish Triportheus albus

Georgina M. Cooke, Ning L. Chao & Luciano B. Beheregaray
The unparalleled diversity of tropical ecosystems like the Amazon Basin has been traditionally explained using spatial models within the context of climatic and geological history. Yet, it is adaptive genetic diversity that defines how species evolve and interact within an ecosystem. Here we combine genome scans, population genetics and sequenced-based phylogeographic analyses to examine spatial and ecological arrangements of selected and neutrally evolving regions of the genome of an Amazonian fish, Triportheus albus. Using a...

Data from: Cost of reproduction in the Queensland fruit fly: Y-model vs. lethal protein hypothesis

Benjamin G. Fanson, Kerry V. Fanson & Phillip W. Taylor
The trade-off between lifespan and reproduction is commonly explained by differential allocation of limited resources. Recent research has shown that the ratio of protein to carbohydrate (P:C) of a fly's diet mediates the lifespan/reproduction trade-off, with higher P:C diets increasing egg production but decreasing lifespan. To test if this P:C effect is due to changing allocation strategies (Y-model hypothesis) or detrimental effects of protein ingestion on lifespan (lethal protein hypothesis), we measured lifespan and egg...

Data from: Hybridization of Southern Hemisphere blue whale subspecies and a sympatric area off Antarctica: impacts of whaling or climate change?

Catherine R. M. Attard, Luciano B. Beheregaray, K. Curt S. Jenner, Peter C. Gill, Micheline- N. Jenner, Margaret G. Morrice, Kelly M. Robertson & Luciana M. Möller
Understanding the degree of genetic exchange between subspecies and populations is vital for the appropriate management of endangered species. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) have two recognized Southern Hemisphere subspecies that show differences in geographic distribution, morphology, vocalizations and genetics. During the austral summer feeding season the pygmy blue whale (B. m. brevicauda) is found in temperate waters and the Antarctic blue whale (B. m. intermedia) in polar waters. Here we used genetic analyses to report...

Data from: In the eye of the beholder: visual mate choice lateralization in a polymorphic songbird

Jennifer J. Templeton, D. James Mountjoy, Sarah R. Pryke & Simon C. Griffith
Birds choose mates on the basis of colour, song and body size, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying these mating decisions. Reports that zebra finches prefer to view mates with the right eye during courtship, and that immediate early gene expression associated with courtship behaviour is lateralized in their left hemisphere suggest that visual mate choice itself may be lateralized. To test this hypothesis, we used the Gouldian finch, a polymorphic species in...

Data from: Platelet factor 4 and Duffy antigen required for platelet killing of Plasmodium falciparum

Brendan J. McMorran, Laura Wieczorski, Karen E. Drysdale, Jo-Anne Chan, Hong Ming Huang, Clare Smith, Chalachew Mitiku, James G. Beeson, Gaetan Burgio & Simon J. Foote
Platelets restrict the growth of intraerythrocytic malaria parasites by binding to parasitized cells and killing the parasite within. Here, we show that the platelet molecule platelet factor 4 (PF4 or CXCL4) and the erythrocyte Duffy-antigen receptor (Fy) are necessary for platelet-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum parasites. PF4 is released by platelets on contact with parasitized red cells, and the protein directly kills intraerythrocytic parasites. This function for PF4 is critically dependent on Fy, which binds...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Macquarie University
    12
  • Flinders University
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of Lisbon
    2
  • Federal University of Amazonas
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    1
  • United Nations Environment Programme
    1
  • Australian National University
    1