17 Works

Data from: Sexual deception in a cannibalistic mating system? testing the Femme Fatale hypothesis

Katherine L. Barry
Animal communication theory holds that in order to be evolutionarily stable, signals must be honest on average, but significant dishonesty (i.e. deception) by a subset of the population may also evolve. A typical praying mantid mating system involves active mate searching by males, which is guided by airborne sex pheromones in most species for which mate-searching cues have been studied. The Femme Fatale hypothesis suggests that female mantids may be selected to exploit conspecific males...

Data from: Quantifying realized inbreeding in wild and captive animal populations

Ulrich Knief, Georg Hemmrich-Stanisak, Michael Wittig, Andre Franke, Simon C. Griffith, Bart Kempenaers & Wolfgang Forstmeier
Most molecular measures of inbreeding do not measure inbreeding at the scale that is most relevant for understanding inbreeding depression—namely the proportion of the genome that is identical-by-descent (IBD). The inbreeding coefficient FPed obtained from pedigrees is a valuable estimator of IBD, but pedigrees are not always available, and cannot capture inbreeding loops that reach back in time further than the pedigree. We here propose a molecular approach to quantify the realized proportion of the...

Data from: Age-dependent social learning in a lizard

Daniel W. A. Noble, Richard W. Byrne & Martin J. Whiting
Evidence of social learning, whereby the actions of an animal facilitate the acquisition of new information by another, is taxonomically biased towards mammals, especially primates, and birds. However, social learning need not be limited to group-living animals because species with less interaction can still benefit from learning about potential predators, food sources, rivals and mates. We trained male skinks (Eulamprus quoyii), a mostly solitary lizard from eastern Australia, in a two-step foraging task. Lizards belonging...

Data from: Developmental stress increases reproductive success in male zebra finches

Ondi L. Crino, Colin T. Prather, Stephanie C. Driscoll, Jeffrey M. Good & Creagh W. Breuner
There is increasing evidence that exposure to stress during development can have sustained effects on animal phenotype and performance across life-history stages. For example, developmental stress has been shown to decrease the quality of sexually selected traits (e.g. bird song), and therefore is thought to decrease reproductive success. However, animals exposed to developmental stress may compensate for poor quality sexually selected traits by pursuing alternative reproductive tactics. Here, we examine the effects of developmental stress...

Data from: Dissecting the variation of a visual trait: the proximate basis of UV-Visible reflectance in crab spiders (Thomisidae)

Felipe M. Gawryszewski, Debra Birch, Darrell J. Kemp & Marie E. Herberstein
1. The astounding diversity of animal colouration is indicative of a wide variety of selection pressures. Despite great interest in adaptive function, detailed understanding of the constituent elements of colour traits is lacking for many systems. Such information is important in allowing more accurate appraisals of colour variation and its potential production costs. 2. In this study, we ‘dissect’ the dorsal colour of crab spiders (Thomisidae) to examine the mechanistic basis of a polyphenic colour...

Data from: Riverscape genetics identifies replicated ecological divergence across an Amazonian ecotone

Georgina M. Cooke, Erin L. Landguth & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Ecological speciation involves the evolution of reproductive isolation and niche divergence in the absence of a physical barrier to gene flow. The process is one of the most controversial topics of the speciation debate, particularly in tropical regions. Here, we investigate ecologically based divergence across an Amazonian ecotone in the electric fish, Steatogenys elegans. We combine phylogenetics, genome scans and population genetics with a recently developed individual-based evolutionary landscape genetics approach that incorporates selection. This...

Data from: Evidence for shifts to faster growth strategies in the new ranges of invasive alien plants

Michelle R. Leishman, Julia Cooke & David M. Richardson
Understanding the processes underlying the transition from introduction to naturalisation and spread is an important goal of invasion ecology. Release from pests and pathogens in association with capacity for rapid growth are thought to confer an advantage for species in novel regions. We assessed leaf herbivory and leaf-level traits associated with growth strategy in the native and exotic ranges of 13 invasive plant species from 256 populations. Species were native to either the Western Cape...

Data from: Riverscape genetics identifies replicated ecological divergence across an Amazonian ecotone

Georgina Margaret Cooke, Erin L. Landguth & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Ecological speciation involves the evolution of reproductive isolation and niche divergence in the absence of a physical barrier to gene flow. The process is one of the most controversial topics of the speciation debate, particularly in tropical regions. Here, we investigate ecologically based divergence across an Amazonian ecotone in the electric fish, Steatogenys elegans. We combine phylogenetics, genome scans, and population genetics with a recently developed individual-based evolutionary landscape genetics approach that incorporates selection. This...

Data from: The hawk-dove game in a sexually reproducing species explains a colorful polymorphism of an endangered bird

Hanna Kokko, Simon C. Griffith & Sarah R. Pryke
The hawk–dove game famously introduced strategic game theory thinking into biology and forms the basis of arguments for limited aggression in animal populations. However, aggressive ‘hawks’ and peaceful ‘doves’, with strategies inherited in a discrete manner, have never been documented in a real animal population. Thus, the applicability of game-theoretic arguments to real populations might be contested. Here, we show that the head-colour polymorphism of red and black Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) provides a real-life...

Data from: Roses are red, violets are blue - so how much replication should you do? An assessment of variation in the colour of flowers and birds

Rhiannon L. Dalrymple, Francis K. C. Hui, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Darrell J. Kemp & Angela T. Moles
After years of qualitative and subjective study, quantitative colour science is now enabling rapid measurement, analysis and comparison of colour traits. However, it has not been determined how many replicates one needs to accurately quantify a species' colours for studies aimed at broad cross-species trait comparison. We address this major methodological knowledge gap. We first quantified and assessed the variance in colour within and between species. Reflectance spectra of flowers from ten plant species and...

Data from: How much of the world is woody?

Richard G. FitzJohn, Matt W. Pennell, Amy E. Zanne, Peter F. Stevens, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell & Matthew W. Pennell
1.The question posed by the title of this paper is a basic one, and it is surprising that the answer is not known. Recently assembled trait datasets provide an opportunity to address this, but scaling these datasets to the global scale is challenging because of sampling bias. Although we currently know the growth form of tens of thousands of species, these data are not a random sample of global diversity; some clades are exhaustively characterised,...

Data from: Signal design and courtship presentation coincide for highly biased delivery of an iridescent butterfly mating signal

Thomas Edward White, Jochen Zeil & Darrell J. Kemp
Sensory drive theory contends that signalling systems should evolve to optimize transmission between senders and intended receivers, while minimising visibility to eavesdroppers where possible. In visual communication systems, the high directionality afforded by iridescent colouration presents underappreciated avenues for mediating this trade-off. This hypothesis predicts functional links between signal design and presentation such that visual conspicuousness is maximised only under ecologically relevant settings and/or to select audiences. We addressed this prediction using Hypolimnas bolina, a...

Data from: Morphological and moisture availability controls of the leaf area-to-sapwood area ratio: analysis of measurements on Australian trees

Henrique Furstenau Togashi, Ian Colin Prentice, Bradley John Evans, David Ian Forrester, Paul Drake, Paul Feikema, Kim Brooksbank, Derek Eamus, Daniel Taylor & Iain Colin Prentice
1. The leaf area-to-sapwood area ratio (LA:SA) is a key plant trait that links photosynthesis to transpiration. The pipe model theory states that the sapwood cross-sectional area of a stem or branch at any point should scale isometrically with the area of leaves distal to that point. Optimization theory further suggests that LA:SA should decrease toward drier climates. Although acclimation of LA:SA to climate has been reported within species, much less is known about the...

Data from: Sex and boldness explain individual differences in spatial learning in a lizard

Pau Carazo, Daniel W. A. Noble, Dani Chandrasoma & Martin J. Whiting
Understanding individual differences in cognitive performance is a major challenge to animal behaviour and cognition studies. We used the Eastern water skink (Eulamprus quoyii) to examine associations between exploration, boldness and individual variability in spatial learning, a dimension of lizard cognition with important bearing on fitness. We show that males perform better than females in a biologically relevant spatial learning task. This is the first evidence for sex differences in learning in a reptile, and...

Data from: Biomechanical and leaf-climate relationships: a comparison of ferns and seed plants

Daniel J. Peppe, Casee R. Lemons, Dana L. Royer, Scott L. Wing, Ian J. Wright, Christopher H. Lusk & Chazelle H. Rhoden
Premise of the study: Relationships of leaf size and shape (physiognomy) with climate have been well characterized for woody non-monocotyledonous angiosperms (dicots), allowing the development of models for estimating paleoclimate from fossil leaves. More recently, petiole width of seed plants has been shown to scale closely with leaf mass. By measuring petiole width and leaf area in fossils, leaf mass per area (MA) can be estimated and an approximate leaf life span inferred. However, little...

Data from: Are leaf functional traits “invariant” with plant size, and what is “invariance” anyway?

Charles A. Price, Ian J. Wright, David D. Ackerly, Ülo Niinemets, Peter B. Reich & Erik J. Veneklaas
Studies of size-related plant traits have established a suite of mathematical functions describing whole plant investment and allocation. In parallel, studies of plant “economic spectra” have measured the scaling and variance composition of traits related to the major dimensions of both structure and function. Here we explore the intersection of these two broad areas by exploring the notion that many leaf economic traits are invariant with species differences in adult plant size. Invariant traits are...

Data from: Sexual signals for the colour-blind: cryptic female mantids signal quality through brightness

Katherine L. Barry, Thomas E. White, Darshana N. Rathnayake, Scott A. Fabricant & Marie E. Herberstein
1. Cryptic coloration may evolve in response to selective pressure imposed by predators, yet effective intraspecific communication may require some level of detectability. This creates a tension between the benefits of sexually selected visual traits and the predatory costs imposed by greater conspicuousness, and little is known about how this tension may be ameliorated in highly cryptic species. 2. We explore these competing demands in the false garden mantid Pseudomantis albofimbriata, a colour-blind and seemingly...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • Macquarie University
    17
  • University of Montana
    3
  • Australian National University
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • University of Western Australia
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    1
  • Baylor University
    1
  • National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1